.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Out and about 11-3-11

    Art openings

     

  • Review: Go 'Into the Woods' with LALO for spooky fun

    We’ve all heard the story of Cinderella, who became an unlikely bride after being granted a wish by her fairy godmother and met a handsome, young prince. Her ugly stepsisters however weren’t so lucky.

    Then there’s Little Red Riding Hood, who encountered a big, bad wolf while on her way to grandmother’s house. In the end, a hunter saved Red Riding Hood and the wolf got a belly full of rocks for his trouble.

  • Review: Go 'Into the Woods' with LALO for spooky fun

    We’ve all heard the story of Cinderella, who became an unlikely bride after being granted a wish by her fairy godmother and met a handsome, young prince. Her ugly stepsisters however weren’t so lucky.

    Then there’s Little Red Riding Hood, who encountered a big, bad wolf while on her way to grandmother’s house. In the end, a hunter saved Red Riding Hood and the wolf got a belly full of rocks for his trouble.

  • Restaurant inspections 11-03-11

    The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department. 

     

    Los Alamos

     

  • Celebrating the dead

     Dia de los Muertos conjures up a variety of images. Those which feature skeletons, painted skull faces and sugar skulls are the norm. 

     

  • Thanksgiving air travel forecast: full flights

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Passengers may have to compete with slightly fewer people getting to the airport this Thanksgiving, but flights will be as full as ever, airline industry officials said Thursday.

    The Air Transport Association's annual Thanksgiving travel forecast predicts 37,000 fewer passengers per day — about a 2 percent drop — over the holiday period compared to last year.

    But U.S. carriers have reduced capacity to match demand and offset higher costs, the association said. That means few empty seats.

  • Peaceful Occupy protests degenerate into chaos--video extra

    OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — A protest that shut down the Port of Oakland to show the broadening reach of the Occupy Wall Street movement ended in violence when police in riot gear arrested dozens of protesters overnight who broke into a vacant building, shattered downtown windows, sprayed graffiti and set blazes along the way.

    At least four protesters were hospitalized Thursday with various injuries, including one needing stitches after fighting with an officer, police said. Several officers were also injured but didn't need hospitalization.

    "We go from having a peaceful movement to now just chaos," protester Monique Agnew, 40, said early Thursday.

  • Los Alamos ranks at top of magazine's millionaires list

    Los Alamos, already tagged as the sixth richest county in the U.S., now has another distinction after being ranked number one in terms of “Where Millionaires Live in America.”

    The article published in the November edition of Kiplinger takes a look at a report produced by Phoenix Marketing International, a company that keeps tabs on wealthy households. The firm also ranks 942 towns and cities by the concentration of millionaires.

  • Dad caught on video beating daughter 'needs help'--video extra

    PORTLAND, Texas (AP) — Hillary Adams says that until last week, only a couple of close friends knew about the savage beating she received seven years ago from her father, a Texas judge who handles child abuse cases.

    Now the beating is on display for the world on YouTube thanks to a secret video she made, and her father, Aransas County Court-at-Law Judge William Adams, is the subject of a police investigation.

  • Fed foresees far weaker growth than it had earlier

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve sketched a bleaker outlook Wednesday for the economy, which it thinks will grow much more slowly and face higher unemployment than it had estimated in June.

    The Fed's gloomier forecast shows that the recovery from the recession has continued to fall short of expectations. Some economists said it makes the Fed more likely to act further to try to boost the economy, though probably not until early next year.

    One option would be a program similar to the Fed's $600 billion in Treasury bond purchases, which it completed in June. Some economists think the Fed could buy mortgage-backed securities instead, which could more directly support the depressed housing market by lowering loan rates.