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Today's News

  • State roundup 04-20-11

    Aggies softball blanks Lobos

    The New Mexico State University softball team shut out New Mexico 6-0 to extend its win streak to six consecutive games at Lobo Field Tuesday.
    NMSU (33-12) opened with a pair of runs early in the second inning and then added four more in the top of the sixth to clinch its third straight win over UNM in Albuquerque.
    Junior Tiare Jennings ripped a home run for the fifth straight game as the Aggies spread nine hits over seven innings. Meanwhile, Aggie right-hander Celisha Walker earned her fifth win of the season in the circle.
    The Aggies got a measure of revenge with Tuesday’s win. The Lobos (17-18) won a 3-2 decision in Las Cruces April 4.

  • Swimming: Lake signs to join Florida Southern

    Friends attending his signing ceremony joked Dylan Lake decided to move to Lakeland, Fla., just so he wouldn’t forget the name of his new town.
    But there’s no joking about Lake’s talent in the water.
    Lake, a Los Alamos High School senior, signed his National Letter of Intent to attend Florida Southern College during a ceremony at the school last week. Lake will join the FSC Mocs’ men’s swim team next year.
    The Mocs — short for Moccasins — finished eighth in the NCAA Division-II National Swimming Championships last month and Lake is thrilled to be joining the program.
    Moreover, he’s happy to be through with the process of figuring out where he might spend the next four years.

  • The glue that binds us

    We are a society of laws. We have to be. Our laws provide the glue holding us together. Laws are just the beginning. The institutions of society are the rest.
    By institutions I mean enforcement of the laws, respect for the central place of private property, effective education and a working health care system.
    On the latter, I spent time recently with my mother completing an 82-page admissions document required by the facility where she is receiving care. The waste in this document boggles the mind.
    My topics today, however, are laws that work with leavening from the delightfully named “stupid factor.”
    Abandoned mines offer continuing application of the stupid factor, especially when young men and alcohol are around.

  • Local banter out does Middle East experience

    I have just returned from three weeks in the Middle East (Egypt and Israel). Not one problem — no gun shots nor riots. Peaceful and quiet; unlike the banter over the Trinity Drive reconstruct I left in Los Alamos!
    The Egyptians were especially happy to see us and treated us like kings and queens — well, at least like the elite. Loved the way they turn three-lane highways into seven lane ones with cars going every which way when the traffic load gets heavy. Looked like they were braiding hair. Made me think of a congested two-lane Trinity Drive.
    Since I was gone, I did not attend the April 7 meeting on the Trinity Drive reconstruct. Here are a few comments I would have made.

  • New DOT rule tackles fees, bumping, flight delays

    DALLAS (AP) — Airlines will soon be required to refund bag fees if they lose luggage, and they'll pay travelers more for bumping them from a flight.

    The federal government planned to announce new passenger protections Wednesday that also expand a tarmac-delay rule to prevent passengers from being stranded on international flights for longer than four hours.

    The airlines will also have to include fees and taxes in advertised prices.

  • College students get hard lessons in finance

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In these tight times, college students are getting a lesson in economics no matter what their major. Students say money influences everything from what school they attend and what career they pursue to how quickly they complete their degrees — or whether they graduate at all.

    Money problems, not bad grades, are the reason cited by most college students who have considered dropping out, an Associated Press-Viacom poll finds.

  • Tech earnings give Nasdaq biggest jump in 6 months

    NEW YORK (AP) — Strong earnings from technology companies including Intel Corp. sent stocks soaring Wednesday. The Nasdaq composite index had its biggest one-day jump in six months.

    The Nasdaq rose 57, or 2 percent, to 2,802 in early afternoon trading. The technology-focused index hasn't risen that much since Oct. 5.

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 200 points, or 1.6 percent, to 12,467.

  • Careful search for mementos slows Japan's rebuilding

    KESENNUMA, Japan (AP) — Sakuji Funayama watched intently as a giant steel claw tore chunks off the remains of his two-story home, ripped open like a dollhouse by last month's tsunami and washed up onto a pile of debris. Suddenly, he spied something, waved his arms and pointed.

    The claw froze and a half dozen construction workers scrambled into the wreckage, emerging a few minutes later with a battered backpack that belonged to Funayama's son, who moved away years ago. He set it off to the side.

  • Day of remembrance: 1 year after Gulf oil disaster

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Relatives of some of the 11 men who died aboard the Deepwater Horizon oil rig are flying over the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday, back to the epicenter of the worst offshore oil spill in the nation's history.

    Meanwhile, on land, vigils were scheduled in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida to mark the spill.

  • NM man found not guilty in crash that killed teens

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A 29-year-old man who was charged in a crash that killed four teenagers and seriously injured a fifth has been found not guilty by a Santa Fe jury.

    Jurors reached their verdict Tuesday evening in the case of Scott Owens.

    The Santa Fe-area man had pleaded not guilty to four counts of vehicular homicide and one count of causing great bodily harm in the June 28, 2009, crash on the Old Las Vegas highway near Santa Fe.

    Authorities allege he was driving in the wrong lane just after midnight when he ran into the teens' car.

    Officials had said his blood-alcohol content was 0.16 percent, double the legal driving limit.