Today's News

  • State Briefs 02-21-12

    Governor signs anti-corruption bill

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez has signed into law legislation that could require public officials convicted of corruption-related crimes to give back to the state their salaries and forfeit their accrued state pension benefits.
    The new law takes effect May 16.
    The former prosecutor said in a statement the measure sends a message that corruption in New Mexico will not stand.
    Lawyer settles claim in Vaughan case

    ALBUQUERQUE— The lawyer credited with giving Albuquerque real estate executive and admitted Ponzi schemer Doug Vaughan the idea for raising cash through promissory notes has reached a settlement in the case.

  • State proposes to overhaul Medicaid program

    SANTA FE (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration is proposing to overhaul a program that provides health care to a fourth of the state’s population, and the changes could require some needy New Mexicans to dig into their pockets to pay a fee if they go to an emergency room for medical care that’s not considered an emergency.
    One of the goals of the planned revision is to slow the rate of growth in Medicaid, which accounts for 16 percent of this year’s state budget and costs New Mexico taxpayers nearly $1 billion.

  • The final days of the session

    The final week of the session proved to be alternatively busy or boring, but always unpredictable.   As required in the constitution, the session ended promptly at noon on Thursday.   No actions after noon on the 30th day of even year sessions are constitutional.  
    This session ended with a filibuster by Representative Stewart that killed the Governor’s social promotion bill (Senate Bill 96).   This came after Representative Roch filibustered the General Obligation Bond bill (Senate Bill 66) that funds major capital projects for more than an hour.
    By 1:30PM nearly everyone—Senators, Representatives, staff, and citizens--had departed and the Roundhouse almost empty and eerily quiet.  

  • Police Beat 02-21-12

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt.

    Feb. 9

    1:32 p.m. – Aspen Elementary School reported that a 12-year-old female, Los Alamos, is alleging that she had been raped near Los Alamos High School. The case is under investigation.

    11:33 p.m. – A 28-year-old man reported that he had been bitten by an undisclosed animal at 3917 West Rd. The animal was impounded.

    Feb. 10

    1:19 p.m. – A 29-year-old man reported that he had been robbed at 3851 Alabama Ave.

    Feb. 12

  • Update 02-21-12

    GOP convention

    The Los Alamos Republicans will hold their pre-primary convention Feb. 23 at the VFW, 1793 Deacon St. Registration begins at 6:30 p.m. and doors close promptly at 7 p.m.   A Central Committee meeting will be at 7 p.m.
    Little League

    Los Alamos Little League will host a planning meeting at 6 p.m. Feb. 21 at Mesa Public Library. The meeting is for anyone interested in coaching or volunteering during the 2012 season.

    PRC meeting

    New Mexico Public Regulation Commission (PRC) member, Douglas J. Howe, will host a public meeting at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge to discuss renewable energy development in New Mexico.

    Dem convention

  • Research: More grapes, less wrath

    A team of researchers has found a way to ensure that your evening glass of wine will continue to be available, despite the potential attack of Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), a bacterium that causes Pierce’s Disease and poses a significant threat to the California wine industry’s valuable grapevines.

    Researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), University of California at Davis (UCD), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service have created specially engineered grapevines that produce a hybrid antimicrobial protein that can block Xf infection.

  • Judge Hall unveils redistricting options

    Judge James Hall released two alternatives to redrawing the map of 70 State House Districts and in either of the alternatives, Los Alamos County would remain whole.

    Both plans have District 43 composed of Los Alamos county; Rio Arriba county precincts 25 and 30; Sandoval county precincts 7, 16 through 18, 21 through 23, 51, 78 and 79; and Santa Fe county precincts 12 and 80.

    The biggest difference in the map proposals is whether Ben Luján’s district is merged with Democratic Rep. Nick Salazar or whether Salazar’s district is merged with Thomas Garcia of Ocate.

  • Charges unfounded in sexual assault of 12-year-old girl

    An alleged rape of a 12-year-old female was deemed unfounded, according to a Los Alamos Police Department incident report.

    The girl alleged that construction workers near or around Los Alamos High School had sexually assaulted her.

     And Deputy Police Chief Kevin Purtymun told the Los Alamos Monitorearly Tuesday that the case was still active.

     But a public records request for the actual report, which the department’s Records Division supplied Tuesday afternoon, indicated that the girl’s allegation was determined to be a fabrication Feb. 17 after a subsequent interview with her.

  • Major projects on the move in White Rock

    Efforts to develop a White Rock Center Master Plan/Economic Development Strategy began in August of 2007. The initial planning took 11 months and involved seven community forums, 10 Steering Committee meetings, three county council briefings, interviews, and an interactive project website.

    The goal was to create a thriving, active focal point that serves the community with a range of services and amenities.

    Council approved the master plan in 2008 and created a placeholder targeted at $20 million for the project.
    The first two segments of the master plan are underway. The long planning stage had residents doubting the development would ever happen, and some are still dubious that a proposed civic center will ever come to fruition.

  • Video Essay: Bike demolition derby

    An event called the Chariot Wars has become the most violent and visible of Portland's three-day Mini Bike Winter Olympics.