.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • 41-pound Cat at Texas Shelter Needs Home

    A North Texas animal shelter has a 41-pound fat cat named Skinny who needs a home. Officials at the Richardson Animal Shelter are caring for the 5-year-old orange tabby. She was dropped off at the facility last week.

  • LAHS Homecoming Parade a hit for all ages

    Most of the residents of Los Alamos came out and LAHS alumni returned to town on a sunny Friday afternoon. They came to watch the annual Los Alamos High School homecoming parade and tonight's football game against Kirtland Central. Here are some images from the afternoon.

  • Cebolita Fire Burning Three Miles West of LaCueva

    Below is fire information regarding the Cebollita Fire that was discovered today.  The fire is located on the Jemez Ranger District three miles west of La Cueva.
     
    Today residents from La Cueva and Jemez Springs will see smoke.  Fuels on the ground are creating a fair amount of smoke. The Cebollita Fire is at 2 acres and holding.  An incident commander is on scene and 2 engines are enroute.

    Cebollita Fire, Jemez Ranger District

    Fire Name:  Cebollita Fire
    Time/Date Reported:  2:05 p.m. September 21
    Time/Date Discovered: Afternoon of September 21
    Location:  Approximately 3 miles west of La Cueva   
    Legal Description: 19N, 3E, Sec 19  
    Cause: Human-caused
    Fuels:  Ponderosa Pine
    Size:  2 acres
    Containment: 0%

  • Trails reopened

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has reopened trails located on U.S. Department of Energy property near the Timber Ridge and Ridge Park condominiums. The trails were closed temporarily while the laboratory conducted environmental sampling and cleanup work in the area, which is south of Trinity Drive and west of Oppenheimer Drive. The trails will remain open while the laboratory and the New Mexico Environment Department analyze the results of the latest samples. If there is a need for further work in the area that requires any further temporary trail closures, the laboratory will issue an announcement that includes location details.

  • Briefs 09-21-12

    Police say SF man hogtied 5-year-old son

    SANTA FE  (AP) — Police in Santa Fe say they arrested a man on a child abuse charge after the uncle of the man’s 5-year-old son found the boy hogtied in a bathroom.
    A police probable cause statement obtained by the Santa Fe New Mexican says the uncle told officers he confronted 28-year-old Damon Gardner after finding the boy Thursday morning. The report says Gardner told the uncle he tied up his son because he didn’t believe in spanking and needed to punish the boy for acting out.
    The uncle and Gardner ended up in a fight and another person in the home called police.
    Gardner’s wife told the responding officer that she saw her son lying face down on the bathroom floor tied up.
    It isn’t clear if Gardner has a lawyer.

    Gov. Martinez kicks off health kids challenge

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez wants to make New Mexico’s kids healthier.
    She was at Kirtland Elementary School in Albuquerque Thursday to kick off a new program that teaches kids better habits.

  • Update 09-21-12

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will hold a special session to discuss the Trinity Site at 7 p.m. Monday in council chambers.

    Court closed

    The Los Alamos Municipal Court Clerk’s Office will be closed Sept. 26-28 for staff to attend training. Payments due during this period may be mailed to Los Alamos Municipal Court, 2500 Trinity Dr., Ste. C, Los Alamos, N.M. 87544 or some payments may be paid online at citepayusa.com.

    School board

    The Los Alamos Public Schools Board of Education will meet for a work session at 5:30 p.m. Thursday in the Speech Theater at Los Alamos High School.

    P&Z meeting

    The Los Alamos Planning and Zoning Commission will meet at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday in council chambers.

    Grand opening

    The County of Los Alamos will host a Grand Opening Ceremony for the new White Rock Visitor Center at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 28.

     

  • NNSA, DOE award research grants

    The Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration and Office of Science announced that 46 research grants totaling $14 million have been awarded as part of the Joint Program in High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas.
    Contemporary advances in laser, particle beam and pulsed power technologies have made possible the creation of increasingly high energy density states in the laboratory. Studies of such states of matter are providing insights into fields ranging from astrophysics to fusion energy.
    Six of the grants went to scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    “These awards demonstrate the strong and valuable partnership of NNSA and the Office of Science,” NNSA Administrator Thomas D’Agostino said. “The work funded will enhance and promote cutting edge research that supports the missions of both organizations. I want to personally congratulate the recipients of these awards for their dedication and leadership.”
    “The excellent coordination between NNSA and the DOE Office of Science is enabling us to leverage federal investments in research to advance our understanding of energy and matter,” Office of Science Director William Brinkman said.

  • Nuclear weapons pioneer dies in Chicago

    Julius Tabin, a member of Enrico Fermi’s personal team at the Trinity Site blast in 1945, died in Chicago of heart failure at the age of 92 last month.

    Tabin joined a small group of physicists working on the Manhattan Project, first at the University of Chicago and then at Los Alamos.

    As part of Fermi’s team, he assisted in a series of studies that included measuring the efficiency of the first atomic test blast.

    After the blast, Tabin rode in a lead-lined Sherman tank to ground zero to be the first to collect a core sample of earth for analysis. Due to exposure to excessive radiation while gathering this material, he was restricted from conducting further physics research for an extended period.

    According to the Chicago Tribune, he turned to the law, where his background in physics and his contacts with other pioneers of the atomic age made him the go-to attorney for those who began to form companies in the new industry of nuclear energy.

    “With all those personal contacts, he was quite a rainmaker for the firm,” said Jim Schumann, now of counsel to the intellectual property law firm of Fitch, Even, Tabin & Flannery, where Tabin practiced for 56 years before retiring in 2006.

  • Civil Air Patrol teen gets his wings

    It was a very proud moment for the Salmon family as their son Austin, went up to receive the pre-solo wings he achieved at glider encampment earlier this summer.

    Pre-solo in a glider means that though there’s an instructor in the plane, the instructor lets the pilot do all the flying.

    Salmon received his training, which took place in Hobbs in Late June, early July, in an L-23 glider.

    Salmon’s next step is to get his solo flight wings for glider before moving on to powered flight. Just 16, Salmon has set his sights on perhaps working for Spaceport America as a commercial pilot.

    “I’d really like to be a commercial pilot for a private space company here in New Mexico."

    Not surprisingly, Salmon’s fascination with flight started long before he joined Los Alamos’ Civil Air Patrol two-and-a-half years ago.

    “I’ve been interested in flight my whole life,” Salmon said. “I was totally mesmerized by airplanes; something about them just clicked with me.”

  • Some oppose pond plan

    Despite being notably absent during several public meetings leading to the approval of the conceptual design for the Ashley Pond Park renovations project, a handful of residents attended the 30 percent design meeting Thursday to protest a key conceptual element: the location of a new stage.

    Council candidate Kristin Henderson was the most vocal of a group of five people opposed to the location of the stage — extending over the southeast corner of the pond, with the grassy slope for audience seating and a 20-foot concrete area for dancing. The stage would have a removable cover that would be used only during events.

    Those voicing opposition said there would be no shade in the new location — George Radnovich, a principal of Sites Southwest, LLC, suggested that parks and recreation could remedy that with tree plantings — that the dance space would interfere with walking around the pond and would not be large enough and that it would be too difficult to put chairs on the slope. There were also fears that the space would be too confined.