.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • High Mesa Adventure

     High atop the mesa and deep within the Jemez forest, lies a special place full of historical logging villages and pueblo ruins. This area sees little motorized traffic aside from the occasional 4-wheeler or dirt bike passing through.

    Even those who pass through fail to notice the hundreds of cultural sites along the way. These sites are often completely camouflaged by natural foliage or rocks, only noticeable to those with a trained eye.  

    Within just a few miles of mesa, adventurers can see a historical logging village, a large pueblo ruin, hundreds of lesser pueblo ruins, and rock art from multiple periods of time. Those who desire to find these places will find their way with a little research.

  • UNM-LA set to propose two-mil levy

    The University of New Mexico-Los Alamos Advisory Board is preparing to introduce a two-mil levy to the Los Alamos voters through a mail-in ballot in January. 

    The last time UNM-LA Advisory board tried to levy a tax on voters, it failed. This time, however, according to UNM-LA Executive Director Cedric Page, they are ready to take their case to the public.

    “As a board, we started discussing this last spring, and then meeting over the summer to try and shape our campaign,” Page said. The stakes are so high for the university that Page said they even took steps to hire a professional campaign strategist to help them get their message to the voters.

  • Woman taken to hospital after two-car collision

    A woman was transported to Los Alamos Medical Center this morning when her red  Nissan struck the rear end of a black Honda at the corner of Trinity and Diamond, Capt. Randy Foster confirmed.

     Foster said the driver of the black Honda was not injured and road was now clear.

    Stay tuned to lamonitor.com for details on this breaking story.    

  • Fed to spend $40B a month on bond purchases

    WASHINGON (AP) — The Federal Reserve unleashed a series of aggressive actions Thursday intended to stimulate the still-weak economy by making it cheaper for consumers and businesses to borrow and spend.

    The Fed said will spend $40 billion a month to buy mortgage-backed securities for as long as it deems necessary. It plans to keep short-term interest at record lows through mid-2015 — six months longer than it previously had planned. And it's ready to take other unconventional steps if job growth doesn't pick up.

    A statement from the Fed's policy committee said it thinks "a highly accommodative stance of monetary policy will remain appropriate for a considerable time after the economic recovery strengthens."

    The committee announced the series of bold steps after a two-day meeting. Its actions pointed to how sluggish the economy remains more than three years after the Great Recession ended.

    Stock prices rose on the news. But some economists said they thought the benefit to the economy would be slight.

  • US Sending Warships to Libya
  • Protesters storm US Embassy in Yemen--Video Extra

    SANAA, Yemen (AP) — Chanting "death to America," hundreds of protesters angered by an anti-Islam film stormed the U.S. Embassy compound in Yemen's capital and burned the American flag on Thursday, the latest in a series of attacks on American diplomatic missions in the Middle East.

    The protesters breached the usually tight security around the embassy and reached the compound grounds but did not enter the main building housing the offices. Once inside the compound, they brought down the U.S. flag, burned it and replaced it with a black banner bearing Islam's declaration of faith — "There is no God but Allah."

    Before storming the grounds, demonstrators removed the embassy's sign on the outer wall, set tires ablaze and pelted the compound with rocks.

    It was similar to an attack on the U.S. Embassy in the Egyptian capital of Cairo on Tuesday night. A mob of Libyans also attacked the U.S. consulate in the eastern city of Benghazi on Tuesday, killing American Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.

  • Today in History for September 13th
  • US poverty rate unchanged; record numbers persist

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's poverty rate remained stuck at a record level last year, while household income dropped and the number of people who don't have health insurance declined.

    A Census Bureau report released Wednesday provided a mixed picture of the economic well-being of U.S. households for 2011 as the nation enters the final phase of a presidential election campaign in which the economy is the No. 1 issue.

    The overall poverty rate stood at 15 percent, statistically unchanged from the 15.1 percent rate in the previous year. Experts had expected a rise in the poverty rate for the fourth straight year, but unemployment benefits and modest job gains helped stave that off, the bureau reported. For last year, the official poverty line was an annual income of $23,021 for a family of four.

    While unemployment eased slightly from 2010 to 2011, the gap between rich and poor increased. The median, or midpoint, household income was $50,054, 1.5 percent lower than 2010 and a second straight annual decline.

  • Summit offers little to rural areas

    One of the last times I attended an economic development summit, almost all I got was a lousy facsimile New Mexico license plate saying, “New Ideas New Technologies.” A bunch of papers also came home and sat on a shelf for much of the Richardson administration. 

    The license plate pérdida de tiempo was under the stewardship of John Garcia, Secretary of Economic Development and Tourism under Gary Johnson. Now Garcia’s Republican successor, Jon Barela, plans a “New Century Economic Summit” Oct. 2 in Albuquerque. (Where else?) 

    Most of the background material is on the website of New Mexico First, the policy discussion organization that will facilitate the meeting. See nmfirst.org/events.

  • What NASA Is Looking for on Mars