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Today's News

  • Sheriff’s duties remain at issue in charter debate

    The longest discussion at Thursday’s joint council/Charter Review Committee (CRC) session centered on the recommendation concerning the sheriff. The current charter assigns all law enforcement responsibilities to the Los Alamos Police Department. The sheriff has civil duties defined by state law. The recommendation is that those duties remain unchanged but that confusing language in the charter needs to be clarified.

    Acting County Attorney Brian James is adamantly opposed to any change in the charter language on the grounds that a 1976 court case upheld the current charter, and that any change in language, even to clarify, could subject the new charter to a legal challenge.

  • NCRTD looks at long-range finance plan

    Executive Director Anthony J. Mortillaro outlined three scenarios when it came to the long-range financial plan for the North Central Regional Transit District at a meeting last week at Christus-St. Vincent Hospital in Santa Fe.

    Mortillaro pointed out a worst-case scenario which reflected the possibility that federal funding could be reduced by 30 percent in FY 13 and that Los Alamos County would make its final contribution in 2012.

    “This scenario would result in immediate service reductions as of FY 2014 and possible reductions in the capital and cost allocations to the District members in order to balance the budget,” he wrote.

  • Five honored as LANL Fellows for 2011

    Five scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory have been honored by Laboratory Director Charles McMillan as Laboratory Fellows.
    Laboratory Fellows are honored for their sustained, high-level achievements in programs of importance to the laboratory either a fundamental or important discovery that has led to widespread use or and having become a recognized authority in the field, including outside recognition and an outstanding record of publications.

  • Claims mount from wildfire

    Anyone who suffered property damage or other losses attributable to last summer’s Las Conchas Fire was invited to participate in a conference to discuss potential claims and possible recovery.

    The Albuquerque-based Branch Law Firm together with Kenneth Roye, an attorney from Chico, Calif. specializing in hazard tree claims, hosted the conference at the Sandia Resort and Casino in Albuquerque Saturday.

    “This is our second conference, our first was Nov. 19 in Los Alamos where about 30 families showed up,” said Roye. “They all had some type of damage – structure, timber, vehicle.”

  • Centennial arts crawl

    As part of the state’s centennial celebration, the Mesa Public Library, Los Alamos Historical Museum and Fuller Lodge Art Center hosted an arts crawl Friday evening.

  • Centennial arts crawl

    As part of the state’s centennial celebration, the Mesa Public Library, Los Alamos Historical Museum and Fuller Lodge Art Center hosted an arts crawl Friday evening.

  • Dispute looms over Governor’s tax cut proposals

    SANTA FE (AP) — When the Legislature convenes Tuesday, lawmakers and Gov. Susana Martinez will consider doing what was unthinkable in the past three years because of New Mexico’s sour economy: Cutting taxes.

    With the economy on the mend, the governor is proposing $55 million in tax cuts to boost businesses and encourage them to create jobs. But those tax reductions likely will turn into one of the biggest disputes between the Republican governor and the Democratic-controlled Legislature, which has been forced to slash state spending since 2009 to balance the budget. Many Democrats hoped this year’s session would allow them to restore recent cutbacks in programs and services.

  • Pile Burns Continue

    Burn Boss Bill Armstrong ignites a pile of Ponderosa pine slash during Friday’s burn operation by the Santa Fe National Forest and the Los Alamos County Parks Division. Pile burns will continue through Monday in Walnut, Pueblo and Bayo canyons.

  • Weekend lessons

     I attended my son’s first basketball game recently. As I watched these little guys in their oversized shirts stuffed into long baggy shorts, I was hopeful.
     They had fun. They played hard. They were good sports. They tried their best. They learned some lessons, too.
    They learned that you don’t always get the ball. They learned that sometimes you can make mistakes, but you are expected to keep playing and not quit.  They learned that if you fall down, people care, but they want you to get up and keep going.  

  • GOP treated Johnson shabbily

    To the surprise of almost no one, Gary Johnson bid a less than fond farewell to the Republican Party a couple of weeks ago.
    Whereupon, he signed on as a member of the Libertarian Party and announced that he will seek that party’s presidential nomination this year.
    That Johnson opted to make the Libertarian Party his political home is understandable.   
    Philosophically, the former-Republican former governor has always evidenced libertarian propensities with an ill-disguised disdain for government and what he deems its intrusive role in human affairs.
    Nor is his quest of the Libertarians’ presidential nomination in the least unexpected.