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Today's News

  • Syria lifts emergency laws but warns protesters

    BEIRUT (AP) — Syria's government approved lifting the country's nearly 50-year-old state of emergency Tuesday to meet a key demand of anti-government protesters, but opposition leaders dismissed it as an attempt by President Bashar Assad to claim reforms but maintain his hard-line rule.

    The blunt response suggested the month-old uprising could be entering a more volatile stage: protesters now aiming higher to seek Assad's ouster and his regime warning that the demonstrations must now end.

  • Idaho rescuers alter search operation for miner

    BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Rescuers trying to reach a trapped Idaho silver miner on Tuesday were forced by unstable conditions to alter their operation and are now attempting to reach him from a new direction.

    The changes were necessary due to dangerous conditions more than a mile underground inside the Lucky Friday Mine, said Federal Mine Safety and Health Administration Amy Louviere.

    There, a collapse last Friday trapped Larry "Pete" Marek, a 53-year-old employee of Hecla Mining Co.

  • Wastewater treatment plant tour

    Members of the Española Basin Regional Issues Forum (EBRIF) met on April 14 at the Buffalo Thunder Resort to tour the Pueblo of Pojoaque Wastewater Treatment Plant to provide upgrades to the treatment system.
    Los Alamos County funded the project as part of the Partners for Progress program. They contributed $50,000 to the project.
     

  • Unemployment falls in two-thirds of states

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The unemployment rate fell in two-thirds of the nation's states last month, the latest evidence that the strengthening economy is encouraging many employers to boost hiring.

    The Labor Department said Tuesday that the unemployment rate dropped in 34 states in March. That's the largest number of states to record a decline since June. The rate rose in seven states and was unchanged in nine and Washington, D.C.

  • Jurors rule 3 doctors owe NM patient $9 million

    LAS VEGAS, N.M. (AP) — A San Miguel County jury has awarded a Raton woman $9 million against three doctors after she suffered heart damage when her heart attack was not diagnosed for more than a day.

    Bryanna Baker's attorney, Randi McGinn, said that despite the verdict, the law has a $600,000 cap on what Baker can collect from each doctor, meaning she could collect $1.8 million. McGinn said she plans to challenge the cap's constitutionality.

  • Poll: Students grade high school down, college up

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Young people give mediocre marks to America's high schools but put great faith in its colleges.

    A new Associated Press-Viacom poll suggests most high schools are failing to give students a solid footing for the working world or strong guidance toward college, at a time when many students fear graduation means tumbling into an economic black hole.

    Most of the 18- to 24-year-olds surveyed gave high schools low grades for things that would ease the way to college: A majority say their school wasn't good at helping them choose a field of study, aiding them in finding the right college or vocational school or assisting them in coming up with ways to pay for more schooling.

  • Japan nuke plants starts pumping radioactive water

    TOKYO (AP) — The operator of Japan's crippled nuclear plant began pumping highly radioactive water from the basement of one of its buildings to a makeshift storage area Tuesday in a crucial step toward easing the nuclear crisis.

    Removing the 25,000 metric tons (about 6.6 million gallons) of contaminated water that has collected in the basement of a turbine building at Unit 2 of the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant will help allow access for workers trying to restore vital cooling systems that were knocked out in the March 11 tsunami.

  • Running: So much for that tough Boston Marathon course--video extra

    BOSTON (AP) — The rest of the world can debate whether Geoffrey Mutai set a record when he blistered the Boston Marathon course in 2 hours, 3 minutes, 2 seconds — the fastest anyone has ever run 26.2 miles.

    From Hopkinton to Copley Square, there is no doubt.

    "We had a stunning performance and an immensely fast time here today," Tom Grilk, the head of the Boston Athletic Association, said on Monday. "We in Boston are well-pleased with what has happened, and that's good unto itself. The definitions of others, I will leave to them."

    Mutai outsprinted Moses Mosop down Boylston Street to win by 4 seconds, and the two Kenyans each beat Haile Gebrselassie's sanctioned world record of 2:03:59.

  • GOP insiders embrace Trump's presidential bid

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Out with Sarah. In with The Donald.

    President Barack Obama has launched his re-election bid in a low-key manner, but the Republican Party's search for a challenger seems stranger by the day.

    GOP celebrities like Sarah Palin aren't getting much buzz. Mainstream candidates like Mitt Romney and Tim Pawlenty aren't getting much traction. It's people once considered highly unlikely to compete seriously for the party's nomination who are creating big stirs in early voting states, a reflection of an unformed and uncertain GOP presidential field.

  • Study points to vulnerabilities of plutonium facility in seismic event

    Los Alamos National Laboratory officials are looking at ways to strengthen the structure of its plutonium processing building in response to a study that shows it would be vulnerable to significant damage in the event of a major earthquake.

    LANL adopted an updated site-wide seismic hazard analysis standard in 2007. In response to that effort, LANL’s Seismic Analysis of Facilities and Evaluation of Risk (SAFER) Project has been conducting a detailed multiyear analysis of the seismic design loads on every existing facility at the site. New or proposed facilities are designed to meet the latest seismic response criteria.