.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Topes Notes 07-27-11

    Late HR lifts Albuquerque

    Russell Mitchell belted a two-run home run in the final at-bat for the Albuquerque Isotopes to lift them past Omaha’s Storm Chasers Tuesday.
    Mitchell’s homer off Everett Teaford gave the Isotopes a 6-4 win over the Storm Chasers in Omaha.
    Albuquerque, which was just coming off an up-and-down homestand and had lost two straight to New Orleans, opened its eight-game road trip with a badly-needed win.
    Albuquerque also chopped a game off division-leading Round Rock’s edge, although Round Rock still holds a five-game advantage.

  • LATC tourney is this weekend

    The Los Alamos Tennis Club will be hosting its singles and doubles tournament starting Saturday.
    The tournament, which is open to anyone, will be played at Urban Park’s tennis courts.
    Matches will continue through Sunday.
    Registration for the event is open through Thursday. Entry fee is $20 per person.
    Competition will take place in several different categories, including men’s and women’s singles, doubles, mixed doubles and over-50 singles.
    Entrants in this year’s event may sign up for one or two events.

  • State meet starts Thursday

    The Larry R. Walkup Center will be crowded this week.
    The aquatic center will host the 2011 New Mexico Long Course State Championship meet. The meet starts Thursday afternoon and continues through Sunday.
    Approximately 400 swimmers are expected to compete at the meet, which gets going at 1:30 p.m. Thursday.
    Preliminary events will be held in the mornings Friday through Sunday with finals scheduled for the afternoon and evenings.
    The aquatic center will be closed for regular public swimming until Monday.
    Several local swimmers are scheduled to compete in the state meet. The Los Alamos Aquatomics alone have qualified individuals in more than 100 events.

  • State Notes 07-27-11

    Pair of Lobo players make preseason 1st team, Lobos picked last

  • Smoke and twitches

    It can’t happen again! Not so soon. I just don’t know if I have the strength to go through this again.
    If you were living in Los Alamos in 2001, you’ll now know what every cancer survivor goes through time and time again when there is a chance that their cancer is back.
    When the town was in danger of being devastated by fire again recently, you didn’t have to be a cancer survivor to understand the fear of recurrence.
    Whether it’s a high tumor marker, or a spot on a CAT scan, the fear can be debilitating and exhausting.
    Flashbacks, anxiety, not being able to concentrate, heart constantly racing. Sound familiar? Welcome to our world.

  • Public's right to know is evergreen

    Well, we’ve come full circle. Five years ago, Bill Richardson’s administration was asked for state e-mails about an audit of the driver’s license program.
    It refused, claiming executive privilege, and the Republican Party of New Mexico filed suit.
     This year, Secretary of State Dianna Duran was asked for state e-mails about a similar audit – a cross-check between drivers’ licenses and voter rolls. Duran’s office refused, citing executive privilege, and the American Civil Liberties Union of New Mexico has now filed suit.

  • BAER update

    - BAER Treatment Information -

  • Analysts: Senate plan saves $2.2 trillion

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Budget analysts said Wednesday that a Senate Democratic plan to reduce the deficit and increase the nation's borrowing authority would save $2.2 trillion over a decade, more than a rival House Republican proposal but less than promised. With both bills stuck in neutral, Congress, financial markets and the public remained on edge days before the deadline for heading off a potentially calamitous default.

  • Texas agriculture losses could set new record amid drought

    LUBBOCK, Texas (AP) — Randy McGee spent $28,000 in one month pumping water onto about 500 acres in West Texas before he decided to give up irrigating 75 acres of corn and focus on other crops that stood a better chance in the drought.

    He thought rain might come and save those 75 acres, but it didn't and days of triple-digit heat sucked the remaining moisture from the soil. McGee walked recently through rows of sunbaked and stunted stalks, one of thousands of farmers counting his losses amid record heat and drought this year.

  • South Korea landslides leave 32 dead, 10 missing--video extra

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A blast of heavy rain sent landslides barreling through South Korea's capital and a northern town Wednesday, killing at least 32 people, including 10 college students doing volunteer work.

    The students died as mud and debris engulfed them as they slept in a resort cabin in Chuncheon, about 68 miles (110 kilometers) northeast of the capital Seoul, said Byun In-soo of the town's fire station. A married couple and a convenience store owner also died.