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Today's News

  • Pool tourney is Friday

    The first major event of the Los Alamos County Fair gets going bright and early on day one.
    As has been the case for several years, the fair will kick off with a pool tournament at 8 a.m. Friday. The pool tournament will be at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.
    Anyone interested can register for the tournament. Price for participation is $4.
    For more information, call 662-8920.
     

  • Sports Briefs 8-5-15

    Cross country tryouts
    The Los Alamos High School corss country team’s official tryout week will begin on Monday.
    Interested runners are encouraged to visit the team’s website, laschools.net/Domain/763, for a detailed schedule, “must haves” and much more.

    Afterschool gymnastics
    The Los Alamos School of Gymnastics is mixing up its afterschool program this year.
    Now participants can choose to do an hour-and-a-half instructional class which will include bars, beam, vault, tumbling and dance for girls and bars, rings, vault, tumbling and pommel horse for boys.
    Or participants can choose to spend the hour-and-a-half doing alternative gymnastics activities — trampoline, zip line, pit, tumble track and climbing.
    Kids attending LASG more than once a week can mix it up and do one session of each.
    Wednesday’s afterschool session will do both every week.
    The afterschool program includes supervision from Mountain, Barranca, and Aspen elementary schools to LASG on the Atomic City Transit.
    After a short time for changing clothes and a quick snack from their backpacks, everybody will participate in gymnastics.
    Call 662-9523 for rates and availability, or visit lagymnastics.net for more information.

  • Rain extends tennis tourney

    The Los Alamos Tennis Club’s tournament attracted 43 players who have been battling it out on the courts.
    The tournament was originally scheduled to conclude after Sunday’s action. With rain delays, however, only one of the seven finals has been completed.
    The rest of the finals matches will take place this week.
     

  • Golfers chip in for charity

    The Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce hosted its annual golf tournament Friday to benefit the United Way of Northern New Mexico. Between sponsorships and golfer fees, the tournament raised $6,000 for the cause.

    Out of 14 foursomes who competed, Plateau Properties had the best round. Mike Lippiatt, Mike McNiel, Bruce Norman and Marti Hill combined to shoot a 57 and win the scramble.

    Mark Sandoval’s team (Sandoval, Eddie Sanchez, Warren Finch and Steve Fellows) won a tie-breaker to take second with a 58 while Edgewater Technical Associates (Scott Rizor, Jeff Theesfeld, Joe Kanzleiter and Mark Rosenberger) took third.

    The chamber was thankful to major sponsors: Los Alamos National Bank, the Los Alamos Monitor, the Rio Grande Sun, Christus Health Plan and KRSN; it's hole sponsors: Great Ideas, Edgewater Technical Associates, Strategic Management Solutions, New York Life, The Finishing Touch, LA Daily Post, Kelly Myers – Re/Max, Chris Ortega – Re/Max, Ricoh USA and Griffin & Associates; prize donors: Buffalo Thunder, Don Taylor, Metzgers Do-it-Best Hardware, CB FOX, UnQuarked, and Classic Air Medical; and Bathtub Row Brewing, which provided space for our lunch and awards and gave each golfer a free beverage.

  • Accident on Trinity

    Traffic was temporarily snarled during lunch hour today when a county work truck and a small sedan collided just outside the lower parking lot entrance to Smith's Marketplace on Trinity Drive. No one was injured. Police are still investigating.

  • Today in history Aug. 2
  • Animal shelter 8-2-15

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html

    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.

    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    Annie — A 9-year-old, spayed, female who just loves being petted! She has a very pretty black/gray, orange and white coat with short hair. Due to medical care needed by her owner, Annie is now at the shelter looking for her forever home. She can sometimes be a bit shy with shelter visitors, but she quickly warms up to you when you offer her some belly rubs!

  • Illumination is risky

    Light in living rooms is an ancient and basic need.
    Yet, filling this need reflects the long and shifting trials of society, business and the environment.
    In times past, cave dwellers filled their rooms with wood smoke. Today’s fluorescent light bulbs utilize mercury.
    The story line from then to now is a mini-history of the human race.
    The oil lamp, teaching of smoke and smells, was a new thing in 4500 BC. By 3000 BC, the candle was the latest and best.
    Candles use consumable wicks to control the rate that fuel is burned and thus control how much light is produced and for how long. Candles even tell time.
    As seen in many fields down through history, inventions in lighting came at a quickening pace. Is this effect driven by world population?
    A larger population brings with it more inventors and more demands for products. The world population in 4500 BC is estimated at six million, roughly like today’s Dallas-Fort Worth. By 1800, world population was near one billion.
    For more than 5,000 years, living rooms were lit by improved designs and better fuels for lamps, candles and fireplaces.
    We pick up the story again in early America, in the bloom of revolution.

  • Pajarito, skiers to benefit from wet summer

    An unusually wet summer should help skiers and snowboarders hit the slopes at Pajarito Mountain earlier than they have in years.
    Pajarito’s ownership has targeted Thanksgiving as its opening weekend this season. “It will depend a lot on Mother Nature and cold weather,” Pajarito General Manager Tom Long said. “In the past we’ve had the cold weather, just not a lot of water.”
    Water for snowmaking, however, won’t be a problem this year. As of Wednesday, the snowmaking pond had 6 million gallons of water in it, 12 times more water than it had last year.
    “All of this water has been very good to us,” Long said. “That’s the most we’ve had in a number of years. We’re really excited for snowmaking.”
    If the wet weather continues through monsoon season, the pond may reach its capacity.
    “We’re optimistically anticipating a full pond,” Long said.
    Besides the natural runoff and rainwater the pond has collected, an enhanced water collection system has also helped fill the pond. The mountain got a new 1.5 horsepower pump that has helped Pajarito take full advantage of its collection gallery around the mountain.

  • Summit Garden Club to offer three tours

    The Summit Garden Club will have its monthly meeting on Monday. The program will include a tour of gardens by three club members. The meeting begins at 1:30 p.m. at the home of Bev Cooper, 521 Ridgecrest Dr. in White Rock.  
    After touring the Cooper garden, the group will move on to the gardens of two additional members.  
    Non-members are invited to join the club for the tour and if desiring more information on the Summit Garden Club, all are invited to stay for the business meeting and refreshments.  
    For more information, call Doris Thielemann at 672-9291.  
    The Summit Garden Club is a member of the New Mexico and National Garden Clubs.
    The mission of NGC is to provided education, resources, and national networking opportunities for its members, to promote the love of gardening, floral design and civic and environmental responsibility.
    In addition to education on gardening, the Summit Club is currently maintaining two gardens at Bandelier National Monument and the White Rock Community Garden.