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Today's News

  • Sarah von Sternberg is new schools, public safety reporter

    Sarah von Sternberg has joined the Los Alamos Monitor as the new education and public safety reporter.

    Sarah is from Spring, Texas, and graduated from Sam Houston State University in 2014 with a bachelor’s of arts degree in English. After moving to Austin shortly after, she landed an administrative job working for Travis County’s installment of the Head Start program.

    “That was my first job out of college and I am immensely grateful for everything I learned there,” she said.

    After living in Austin for two years, Sarah got married and promptly moved to New Mexico for her husband’s employment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. She applied for a mailroom position at the Monitor but was happy to learn they had a reporter position available.

    “I knew this would be a great opportunity for me. I’m so happy to be putting the skills I learned in school to good use,” she said.

    As far as activities outside of work, Sarah said, “My husband and I take full advantage of the town’s beautiful and countless trails.”

    She also has a cat named Oppie, named after, Robert Oppenheimer, a huge piece of the town’s history. 

  • Phil Scherer starts as sports reporter

    Phil Scherer is a recent graduate from Division II Lindenwood University, and joins the Los Alamos Monitor Staff as its sports reporter.

    Scherer is a St. Louis, Missouri native, where he spent the first 21 years of his life before relocating to New Mexico.

    He is an avid sports fan, and can be found watching the St. Louis Cardinals and St. Louis Blues whenever they are playing.

    Growing up, Scherer was involved in the Boy Scouts of America, where he attained the rank of Eagle Scout, a distinction earned by just 2 percent of Boy Scouts.

    In high school, Scherer was a member of the swim team. However, during his junior year, he sustained a major shoulder injury that ended his swimming career.

    When competing in athletics was no longer an option, he decided writing about them was the next best thing. By going into sports journalism, he was able to combine his two biggest passions in life: sports and writing.

    He was a four-year member of his college newspaper staff, where he was a reporter, sports editor and managing editor throughout his collegiate career. Scherer earned regional and state awards throughout college for writing and page design.

  • Jemez Springs event to raise funds for veterans

    Fun, food and music will take over Jemez Springs Saturday, as 11 bands will help the community raise funds to help homeless veterans.

    The event is sponsored by Homeless Veterans No Mas, an organization started by local radio personality Dotie Brown, Larry Waisner, Don Conger and others.

    The concerts, which cost $5 for adults and $2 for children, will raise money to support the Fisher House Organization.

    The organization’s goal is to raise money for Fisher house, an organization that provides nearby housing for families who have veterans hospitalized at a Veteran’s Administration hospital.

    Homeless Veterans No Mas is trying to raise $25,000 to help get a “Fisher House” built near the Raymond G. Murphy VA Medical Center in Albuquerque.

    The concerts will be on two stages, the main one, which will feature acts at the Jemez Valley Community Center, and the other stage, which will feature more acoustic acts at the town’s gazebo.

    Homeless Veterans No Mas started in earnest over an experience Waisner had with a friend, who also happened to be a veteran. While Waisner kept up with his friend through the years, there came a day when someone contacted him to tell him that his friend had died of exposure.

    “He had died because he was homeless,” Brown said.

  • Cancellations, postponements caused by today's weather

    Bike To Work Day events cancelled 

    This afternoon's Bike to Work Day events have been cancelled for today due to snow, according to county reports.

    Summer Concert Series moved to Fuller Lodge

    The Gordon Summer Concert Series featuring Chuchito Valdes, scheduled to play at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond, has been moved to Fuller Lodge. Show is still free.

  • LAPD reports a dog attack at Rover Park

    The Los Alamos Police Department is asking the public with assistance in identifying the owners of a dog that attacked another dog this past weekend. The incident happened around 11:00 a.m. this past Sunday at Rover Park in White Rock.

    The suspect dog was described as possibly a male “cane corso”, or a very similar looking mastiff type dog that is black in color and weighing around 100 pounds. Reportedly,a couple with a stroller came to get the dog under control after it attacked another dog while being on a leash with its owner. The dog that was attacked suffered injuries that required treatment from a veterinarian.

    Anybody with information concerning this case is asked to call the Los Alamos Police Department at 662-8222.  

  • New Mexico mosquitoes capable of transmitting the Zika virus

    SANTA FE (AP) — State health officials say mosquitoes capable of transmitting the Zika virus have been found in Dona Ana County.

    The New Mexico Department of Health says it's the first time this season that the mosquito species has been found in that part of the state.

    Mosquito surveillance in New Mexico's southern counties is part of an ongoing joint project to map the range and distribution of the species that can transmit the Zika virus.

    Zika virus can be transmitted to people primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito.

    The mosquitoes become infected when they feed on a person already infected with the virus.
    Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to other people through bites.

    Ten cases of Zika virus disease were reported in New Mexico last year.
     

  • Sportsmen gain new access, campsites on state lands

    Sportsmen have 141 new access points in 14 counties and two new campsites near Carlsbad on state lands, the State Land Office announced today.

    Of the new access points, 124 are open to walk-ins and 17 are accessible by vehicle. In all, there are now 345 access points and 11 campsites on state lands.

    “Land ownership patterns in New Mexico tend to lock sportsmen out, but as promised I have been working with our lessees to create a more open and positive experience for hunters and anglers,” said State Land Commissioner Aubrey Dunn. “Hunting is deeply rooted in our cultural heritage and my office is doing all we can to preserve these traditions.”

    Nearly all of the 9 million acres of surface estate managed by Dunn and the State Land Office are leased for livestock grazing and cropland production, and during New Mexico’s hunting season are open to hunters, anglers and trappers with a valid license and all applicable permits, stamps or validations.

    The State Land Office is partnering with the state Department of Game and Fish and the Bureau of Land Management to offer mobile maps of New Mexico’s big-game hunting units, hunting access points, and more through the “CarryMap” application.

  • PEEC hosts grrreat Bear Festival

    On Saturday morning, the Nature Center was packed with booths, families and bear paraphernalia.

    The Pajarito Environmental and Education Center (PEEC) teamed up with the Land of Enchantment Wildlife Foundation (LEWF) to host New Mexico’s first Bear Festival.

    This festival brought national, state, local and independent organizations together with the sole mission of bear education and appreciation.

    PEEC Director of Interpretation Jonathan Creel explained that their hope is to be “raising awareness of how to coexist with bears,” like the steps to take in bear proofing your home and life.

    Creel gave credit to their partnership with LEWF and said, “The Land of Enchantment was huge in this whole thing. They put in a lot of time and effort, especially with the bear dinner the night before.”

    Dr. Kathleen Ramsay launched LEWF in order to assist bear rehabilitation efforts across New Mexico. Similar to PEEC, their mission is to make Los Alamos bear friendly and bear aware. Because bears are such intelligent, habitual creatures,

  • Organizers serve up food for thought at Bear Feast

    The first–ever Bear Feast at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center drew a crowd Friday that munched on salmon, grapes, watermelon, celery, peanut butter, candy worms, candy mushrooms, candy acorns and honey-dipped cornbread shaped like a beehives.

    The bear buffet menu featured the kind of food bears liked to eat, candy being substituted for what wasn’t edible by humans.

    Residents also got to feast on some bear knowledge from wildlife expert Dr. Kathleen Ramsay and bear attack survivor Karen Williams.

    Ramsay was linked to William’s attack when the surviving cubs from the attack were sent to Ramsay’s wildlife rehabilitation center in Española. Shortly after the attack, which happened in June 2016, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish tracked and euthanized the attacking sow to check for rabies.

    The sow’s two bear cubs were released from the wildlife center this year, weighing in at a healthy 160 and 140 pounds.

    Ramsay talked about the expensive and complicated process of teaching the cubs that arrive at her center how to hunt for their own food and survive on their own in preparation for their eventual release out into the wild. She also talked about their fixation on food and why it’s so important.

  • LAPD honors officers killed in 2016

    Los Alamos Police Department staff, family, friends and community members gathered Monday morning in the Justice Center’s parking lot to honor and remember those who had lost their lives over the past year, including three police officers from New Mexico.

    Police Chief Dino Sgambellone began the ceremony by welcoming those in attendance and also recognizing a recent loss from the community.

    “Although she wasn’t a police officer, we lost one of our own last year, Connie Salazar,” Sgambellone said. “For those of you who knew Connie, you know what a wonderful and giving person that she was.”

    Salazar was fighting a courageous battle against cancer and passed away in 2016. She was employed by the county for over 20 years and had recently retired. “Connie was part of our family and will always be missed. We are thankful for all of the wonderful memories we shared.” Sgambellone iterated that her loss will be felt by not only the LAPD, but also all of Los Alamos and asked for a moment of silence on Salazar’s behalf.