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Today's News

  • John Adams and U.S. Independence

    As we celebrate our independence and astounding development from a fledging nation to the world’s superpower, we should applaud the extraordinary contributions of numerous founders.
    One of them whose accomplishments are often overlooked is John Adams. George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, James Madison and his cousin Samuel Adams typically receive the lion’s share of the credit for the creation and early success of the United States.
    In fact, John Adams has frequently been viewed as “somewhat of a loser.”
    He is the only president among the first five who was not reelected, his Federalist Party never again captured the White House and scholars have not ranked him as a great or near-great president.
    While David McCullough’s best-selling 2001 biography and the acclaimed 2008 HBO miniseries depicting his exploits increased public interest in his life, Adams still does not receive the recognition he deserves.
    Consider these facts. Adams played a pivotal role in the founding of the United States, especially the campaign for independence, the devising of state constitutions and the establishment of America’s diplomatic tradition.

  • Feedlot studies inch ahead

    The feat is to pick up the pace.
    New Mexico is known for stark White Sands and surreal bat caves, not for green pastures. A natural result is public surprise at the numbers reached by the New Mexico dairy industry.
    Dairy is the number one agricultural business in New Mexico. New Mexico ranks eighth in the nation in the value of dairy products. California tops the list.
    From 2001 to 2006, New Mexico’s milk production was the fourth fastest growing in the U.S., with a growth of 33 percent over five years.
    How does a large and fast-growing dairy business tend cows with no pastures? The answer is feedlots.
    Feedlots are large arrays of pens with provisions to feed lots of cows. New Mexico has more than 350,000 milk cows on some 150 dairy farms. Having 2,000 cows in a feedlot is typical.
    You don’t have to be an old cowhand to guess the by-product and problems that come from a pen of 2,000 cows.
    An average dairy cow produces six or seven gallons of milk a day and 18 gallons of wet manure. The story thickens.
    Nitrogen has key roles in nature’s schemes for all major life forms. The involved pathways are found under the heading “nitrogen cycle.”

  • News for retirees July 5-11, 2015

    July 5-11, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Beef tips over rice
    2 p.m.        Pinochle
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety training
    10 a.m.        Computer users group
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Fettuccini alfredo
            primavera
    1:30 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table tennis
    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.        LAVA Quilters
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio Plus Exercise
    10:45 a.m.        Music with Ruth

  • Animal Shelter 7-5-15

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html

    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.

    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.

    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.

    CATS

    Annie — A 9-year-old, spayed, female who just loves being petted! She has a very pretty black/gray, orange and white coat with short hair. Due to medical care needed by her owner, Annie is now at the shelter looking for her forever home. She can sometimes be a bit shy with shelter visitors, but she quickly warms up to you when you offer her some belly rubs!

  • Swimmers approach final stretch after home meet

    As the Los Alamos Aquatomics get ready for their final swim before the state championships, the swimmers seem to be making strides in the water.
    Last weekend during the team’s home meet, the Nogar Memorial Open, many of the swimmers had their best times of the summer.
    “As coaches, we are very happy with the results of the meet,” coach Maribeth Englert said. “We had several swimmers get their first state cut at the Nogar meet. The kids are looking great in practice and should progress through their end of season meets.”
    Swimmers who qualified for state at the Nogar meet in the 9-10 age group were Caleb Cook (100-meter freestyle), Mary Couture (50 backstroke) and Betty Kang (100 back).
    The team also had three 8-year-old girls qualify for events in the 9-10 age group: Molly Couture (100 Back), Marlee Katko (100 breaststroke) and Emily McLaughlin (100 back and 50 back).
    Four Aquatomics finished as meet’s high-point winners and nine others finished in the top-three of the high-point race.
    The team’s 8-and-under girls swept the high-point awards. Katko finished first, Allison Amrani took second and McLaughlin was third. Katko won the 50 fly and the 50 and 100 breaststroke en route to her title.

  • Church listings 7-3-15

    Baha’i Faith
    For information, email losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.
    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA, is located at 2390 North Road, 662-5151; see a map at bethluth.com. The Eucharist is celebrated each Sunday at 9 a.m. with coffee and doughnuts served during fellowship hour starting at 10:15 a.m. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant, and a well-staffed nursery is provided. All are welcome! Come Join the Family!
    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.
    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. and worship at 10:30.  Our current series is “Kingdom Reign” as we study the book of 2 Samuel.
    The Christian Church
    92 East Road, 662-6468, lachristian.org. 9-10 a.m. Sunday school; 10-10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service. Rev. Doug Partin, Assoc. Rev. Ben Partin.
    Christian Science
    1725 17th St. 662-5057.
    Church of Christ

  • America regarded as a Christian nation?

    “Can America be a ‘Christian nation?’ What does the Bible say about that?”—Ray

    The nation may, in its corporate actions, demonstrate evidence of some sort of Christian ethos; e.g., care for the poor, oppressed, sick and dispossessed, and a generous response to conquered enemies. Furthermore, there are many good people in the United States who live by the golden rule.
    It is also possible that some of the founders, Christian in orientation or even in genuine faith, hoped to imbue the new nation with values that were consistent with their faith.
    But strictly speaking, America cannot be a Christian nation. For Christians, Jesus is at the core of their faith.
    The founders, as it happens, rarely spoke of Jesus. They used terms like “Almighty God” or “nature’s God” but were reticent to refer to Jesus.
    When redactors of history claim that the founders intended America to be a “Christian nation,” they fail to explain why Jesus is not in the founding documents.
    The founders, in fact, were very clear on the idea that the nation would be secular, establishing no single religion as the state religion.

  • What to do if someone files a false tax return in your name

    Identity theft is one of the fastest-growing fraud issues at the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).
    Online thieves have been capturing Social Security numbers and other tax filing data to file fraudulent returns, principally for the purpose of stealing refunds.
    Just this past tax season, TurboTax, the leading tax preparation software company, had to stop transmitting state tax returns and introduce new safeguards after a run of suspicious returns. In March, the U.S. Treasury Department reported slightly over 2.9 million incidents of tax-related identity theft in 2013, up from 1.8 million in 2012.
    As to dollar loss, in January, the General Accounting Office (GAO) said the IRS had prevented an estimated $24.2 billion in fraudulent identity theft tax refunds in 2013, but actually paid $5.8 billion in refunds later determined to be fraudulent.
    In terms of damage, tax identity theft is really no different than any other form of identity theft.
    Thieves illegally obtain your Social Security number through online or other resources and then go to work on your finances and reputation.

  • Heating up ice cubes

    Why does soda get cold when you put ice cubes in it?
    When I pose this simple question to my students, I get many different and interesting answers (like “cold is easier to share”).
    It’s not easy to teach and it’s even more difficult to learn.
    All too often, we blur the definitions between “knowledge” and “understanding.” There’s a huge difference between elemental knowledge (learn to count up to 100) and conceptual understanding (perceive the relationship between a number and its prime factors).
    But whereas conceptual understanding is unarguably important, we shouldn’t discount the value of “simply knowing something.”
    For example, I know that it’s not a good idea to drink bleach. No one ever taught me that. I just “know” it.
    As a teacher, I’m constantly looking for some magic formula to transfer knowledge from my head into someone else’s head. Quite frankly, I’m more than willing to let others take ownership of the neural noise between my ears.
    But back to the question, how do students learn? How do students cross the didactic valleys between the mental mesas of “I can do it” and “I actually understand what I’m doing?”

  • Firecracker 5K takes place Saturday

    The Family YMCA in Los Alamos is hosting its annual Firecracker 5K Family Fun Run on Saturday.
    The 5K is open to people of all ages that want to walk, run or jog in the festive event.
    Prizes will go to the top male and female finishers in youth, adult, adult 60-plus and dog jogger divisions.
    The best-costumed participant will also win bagels for a year from Ruby K’s.
    All participants will get the annual Fun Run T-shirt and are eligible to win random door prizes.
    The 5K race route starts in the YMCA parking lot, turns north on 15th to Canyon. Then it goes west on Canyon toward the Aquatic Center and all the way to Diamond. The route then makes a U-turn at the crosswalk and returns to the YMCA along same route, running with traffic.
    Early registration, prior to July 4, at the YMCA, 1450 Iris Street, is encouraged. Race day check-in on July 4 is from 7-7:45 a.m. The race will start at 8 a.m. The price is $30, or $20 for YMCA members, and $10 for youth under 14 years old.
    Volunteers are also needed to help with set-up and takedown, registration check-in, traffic control and to help award prizes. The volunteers will be given race T-shirts.
    Register for the race or sign up to volunteer at the YMCA, or call 662-3100 for more information.