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Today's News

  • Gov. Martinez sets state’s fiscal solvency as priority

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez is warning that before anything reaches her desk during the upcoming legislative session, she wants lawmakers to come up with a “serious solvency package.”
    The Republican governor made the comment Thursday while addressing business leaders in Albuquerque. She’s referring to projections that the state is expected to outspend revenues by nearly $220 million this fiscal year.
    Martinez and lawmakers rolled out dueling budget proposals earlier this week.
    Despite opposition from Democrats, part of her plan calls for sweeping some money from school district reserves.
    She argues that districts are sitting on more than $130 million in such funds and in some cases that’s far beyond the 5 percent recommended for hard times. She says the surpluses can be tapped to avoid classroom and program cuts.

  • Court docs to go online

    The New Mexico Supreme Court announced its decision Jan. 6 to open up access to the public and others as part of a new policy.
    “The new policy is part of the Judiciary’s continuing efforts to make judicial proceedings more transparent and accessible to the public while balancing privacy concerns,” Communications Officer Barry Massey said. “The state courts recognize that people increasingly use and rely on electronic information in their day-to-day lives.”
    The New Mexico court system plans to have computer access operational by the spring or the summer. Access will first be  granted to attorneys licensed in New Mexico, out-of-state attorneys admitted by the New Mexico Supreme Court, state, municipal and federal law enforcement agencies, corrections agencies, federal state and municipal courts, compliance programs and agencies involved in adult, family or child welfare.

  • LANS earns DOE bonus for environmental management

    SANTA FE (AP) — Los Alamos National Security has received a $9.1 million bonus for reaching environmental goals in its operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    The New Mexican reports that the U.S. Energy Department says the contractor excelled in a number of projects to remediate areas of environmental concern during the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30. The company earned 90 percent of the maximum $10.1 million award.
    Decades of improper waste disposal have caused toxic and radiological contamination at the lab and are expected to cost nearly $4 billion to clean up over the next 25 years. The Department of Energy says in a report that the lab has made progress addressing an underground chemical plume that is creeping toward a major aquifer and in cleanup at Technical Area 21.

  • Firefighters save mobile home

    A fire broke out inside a mobile home Tuesday at Royal Crest on 2025 East Jemez Road at 8:15 p.m. Monday night. No one inside the home was injured.
    The fire was caused by fireplace embers inside the home, which is on lot inside the park.
    The fire spread to the ceiling and floor, but firefighters from the Los Alamos Fire Department managed to stop it by pulling out sections of the floor and ceiling.
    Even though firefighters were dealing with a highly flammable structure and high winds, firefighters were able to save the home.
    “They were able to put it out without the fire extending throughout the house,” said LAFD Deputy Chief Steve Dawald. “We had a few things stacked against us and the homeowner, but luckily a quick response with Station 1 right down the street, we were able to get on top of the situation very quickly which led to a very successful save.”
    Dawald made sure the two occupants had places to go Monday night after the fire. They were also given Red Cross contact numbers in case they needed assistance.

  • LANL contractor earns DOE bonus for environmental management

    SANTA FE (AP) — Los Alamos National Security has received a $9.1 million bonus for reaching environmental goals in its operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    The New Mexican reports that the U.S. Energy Department says the contractor excelled in a number of projects to remediate areas of environmental concern during the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30. The company earned 90 percent of the maximum $10.1 million award.

    Decades of improper waste disposal have caused toxic and radiological contamination at the lab and are expected to cost nearly $4 billion to clean up over the next 25 years. The Department of Energy says in a report that the lab has made progress addressing an underground chemical plume that is creeping toward a major aquifer and in cleanup at Technical Area 21.

  • Whooping cough cases in infants increase in New Mexico

    SANTA FE (AP) — New Mexico health officials say the number of cases of whooping cough in infants has increased.
    The Health Department is investigating four infant cases reported in December. The cases are from Eddy, Curry, Rio Arriba and San Juan counties.
    The agency says this is the largest cluster of whooping cough cases investigated by the state since August 2013.
    Health Secretary Lynn Gallagher says the best way for parents to protect against the illness is to get their children vaccinated. She also encourages women to get vaccinated during pregnancy.
    Symptoms of infection may include coughing fits. In infants, another possible symptom is apnea, where there is a pause in the child's breathing pattern.
    About half of babies younger than one year of age who get the disease are hospitalized.
     

  • Today in history Jan. 12
  • Warmer, drier trend continues

    On Friday, a winter snowstorm that promised to bring significant moisture once again came in with a whimper. Instead of the promised four to six inches of snow (early forecasts predicted as much as six to eight inches) Los Alamos received only 2.1 inches.
    That is not the first time that initially promising storm patterns left Los Alamos high and dry. According to both Chuck Jones, senior meteorologist for the National Weather Service/Albuquerque and Los Alamos National Laboratory Meteorologist David Bruggeman, reduced precipitation and warmer temperatures are not only the trend for this winter but a long term trend dating back decades.
    According to Bruggeman, Los Alamos has seen a downward trend in annual average precipitation since 1981. Snowfall has been declining since 1951.
    Both Bruggeman and Jones are predicting this winter will continue to be drier and warmer than usual. Charts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center (cpc.noaa.gov) show all of New Mexico with a 50- to 60-percent chance of having above normal temperatures for the next three months and a 33- to 40-percent chance of below normal precipitation.

  • Today in history Jan. 11
  • White Rock Senior Center opens

    Monday marked the first day seniors in White Rock didn’t have to travel to the Betty Ehart Center in Los Alamos for a hot lunch.
    The White Rock Senior Center was recently outfitted with a kitchen for the first time in its long history.  It also now has a bigger recreation area.
    “This has been a vision for many, many years,” said Los Alamos Senior Services Director Pauline Schneider to the applauding crowd Monday.
    The senior center was one of the last projects in the White Rock Master Plan. It was completed this year.
    Seniors who sat down for the lunch were treated to fried chicken, mashed potatoes, gravy, peas and carrots, rolls and fruit cocktail.
    Lunch will be served from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. weekdays. Reservations are preferred. Reservations can be taken up until 10 a.m. on the day seniors plan to lunch. Lunch is free for seniors 60 or older. Others can attend for $7.50. For now, the best way to make reservations is to visit the center at 133 Longview Drive. Phones are still being installed.
    Schneider said that it will be a little bit before the other programs and features of the center are in place.