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Today's News

  • People In The News 11-12-14

    Kaylie Burk, a junior at Los Alamos High School, has been nominated to attend the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Washington, D.C. Friday through Sunday.
    The Congress of Future Medical Leaders is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields.
    Burk was nominated by Dr. Connie Mariano, the medical director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists to represent Los Alamos High School based on her academic achievement, leadership potential and determination to serve humanity in the field of medicine.

  • Sign up for last Shop with the Chef classes

    The Los Alamos Co-op Market is having its last two cooking classes of the year.
    Dehydrator snacks will be the focus on Nov. 18. Lisa Johnson will show the calss how to make healthy snacks and save money by making the most out of a dehydrator.
    Johnson will also discuss how to customize each recipe to meet the participant’s desired flavor profile.
    The final cooking class of the year will be Dec. 9. Harshini Mukundan will share vegetarian recipes from North India. The cuisine is inspired by Mughalai cooking style, developed by the imperial kitchens of the Muslim Mughal Empire in South Asia.
    Although vegetarian versions will be taught, Mukundan will discuss how to modify the dishes to include chicken, if there is interest.
    Mukundan will also describe low fat and vegan alternatives for both the rice and curry dish.
    The co-op’s Shop with the Chef cooking classes give local chefs the opportunity to share their love of cuisine, starting with shopping for the ingredients and taking participants through the cooking process to all the way to the final product.
    Registration is available through the co-op for $15 for members and $20 for nonmembers. Classes are at 6 p.m. and held in the café at the Entrada location.

  • DPU must accommodate present, future residents

    We are one of the 36 households or businesses in Los Alamos that have purchased solar panels to generate electricity. Recently, the Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities (DPU) has put out information suggesting that electricity generated by the County’s solar panel owners provides miniscule benefits to the community while unfairly burdening other customers. One Board of Public Utilities member was quoted in the Los Alamos Monitor as saying that being carbon neutral is not in the best interest of the ratepayers.
    We disagree completely with this statement. Everyone sees the trees dying around us. Partly this has been caused by the drought, and partly by the trees struggling to deal with rising temperatures during the drought. Our local climate scientists believe that most of our trees will be dead by 2050. By 2099, Los Alamos will have the temperatures that Albuquerque has now. We may be living exponentially, but we will be doing it indoors with air conditioning and outdoors with no trees and no ski area.

  • Remember N.M.'s last Republican speaker?

    New Mexico and Texas were fighting over water. Wildcatters were busy in southeastern New Mexico, while uranium drilling was under way near Grants. And Albuquerque passed a strong new civil rights ordinance.
    This was New Mexico in 1952, when voters liked Ike so much that they tilted Republican in a presidential election for the first time since 1928. They re-elected Republican Gov. Ed Mechem and sent Republicans to the state House of Representatives in record numbers. A Raton rancher became the first Republican Speaker of the House since 1929.
    After a similar sweep this month, a Republican speaker will take the gavel for the first time since 1953, so it’s time to remember Alvin Stockton.
    In 1869, Stockton’s grandparents acquired four square miles around the stage station they operated on the Santa Fe Trail from Lucien Maxwell. Stockton grew up on the family ranch and got an accounting degree from Denver University.
    Elected to the House in 1951, he served four years, becoming an authority on New Mexico’s tax system. It was once said, “If you really need to get something done on behalf of agriculture in the state Legislature, you go to Alvin Stockton.” As speaker, he was so well regarded that members passed a resolution commending him for leadership and impartiality.

  • On Schedule 11-12-14

    Thursday

    Volleyball: Los Alamos at Class 5A championship tournament (Rio Rancho), varsity, 10:30 a.m.

    Friday

    Girls basketball: LAMS Invite, seventh and eighth grade, TBA.

    Saturday

    Wrestling: LAMS at Taos Invite, 8 a.m.

    Swimming and diving: Los Alamos at Albuquerque Academy, boys and girls varsity, 1 p.m.
    Girls basketball: LAMS Invite, seventh and eighth grade, TBA.

  • Winter (Sports) is on Its Way
  • Today in history Nov. 12
  • Briefs 11-11-14

    First half of property
    tax bills due

    Los Alamos County property tax bills for 2014 were mailed to property owners last week. The first half installment becomes delinquent after Wednesday, Dec. 10.
    Payment must either be made in person at the 311 Customer Care Center by 5 p.m. on Dec. 10 or postmarked by midnight that same day to avoid late payment penalty and interest charges. The 311 Customer Care Center is located in the Municipal Building lobby at 1000 Central Avenue.
    They are open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Payments should be mailed to P.O. Box 99, Los Alamos, N.M. 87544. Payments are also accepted through a property tax lockbox at Los Alamos National Bank.

    Central Ave. project
    almost completed

  • Nearly $13M spent in political ads

    SANTA FE (AP) — Nearly $13 million was spent on television advertising in New Mexico races for governor, U.S. Senate and other state offices, a government watchdog group said.
    The governor’s race accounted for the largest share of the ads, about $6.2 million, according to the non-partisan Center for Public Integrity based in Washington, D.C.
    Republican Gov. Susana Martinez spent about $4.6 million to air almost 10,000 ads in her winning re-election campaign through the day before the general election.
    Democratic challenger Gary King broadcast almost 1,200 ads in his primary and general election campaigns, costing about $609,000.
    “Martinez’s TV ads against Gary King prevented him from ever gaining momentum in this campaign,” said Brian Sanderoff, an Albuquerque pollster.
    Martinez won a second term with about 57percent of the vote to 43 percent for King, according to unofficial returns.
    “The candidate who spends more money on TV has a tremendous advantage although it’s no guarantee of victory,” Sanderoff said.
    The Republican Governors Association dumped about $433,000 into hard-hitting ads against King that started within days of the Democrat securing his party’s nomination in a five-way primary race.

  • Correction 11-11-14

    The story in the Nov. 6 Los Alamos Monitor incorrectly stated that Self Help, Inc. received seed money for self-reliance grants. Self Help, Inc. provides the seed money for the grants.