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Today's News

  • Saint Job to host Blini Breakfast

    Saint Job of Pochaiv Orthodox Christian Church will host Blini Breakfast from 9 a.m.-noon Saturday.
    Traditional blini, a type of thin pancake, will be served in the traditional style with smoked salmon, herring, butter and sour cream. Vegetable caviar, eggs, cheese and a variety of berry preserves will also be available.
    Blini are traditionally served in Slavic households during the week before the beginning of the Lenten Fast.
    The thin, crepe-like pancakes are eaten together with fish, sour cream and butter in order to consume all these foods before the beginning of Great Lent.
    These foods – that is, fish and dairy products, along with meat – are not eaten during the 40-day Great Fast period preceding Easter or Pascha, as it is called among Orthodox Christians.
    The practice of fasting, or abstaining from certain foods, dates to Judaism. The practice was recorded in Biblical times, Christ having fasted in the desert for 40 days.
    “Lent” comes from the ancient English word for spring – that  time of natural rebirth which corresponds to the process of inner spiritual regeneration, which every Christian should strive to experience in his or her preparation for celebrating the feast of Christ’s Resurrection.

  • Simple steps can keep IT networks safe

    BY STEVE RESNICK
    Owner, Capitol Computer/Finance New Mexico

  • Watching the governor’s vetoes makes me wonder

    When Bill Richardson started flirting with a plan to run for president, some of his actions as governor looked suspiciously as if he were using New Mexico to advance his political ambitions.
    It’s hard to avoid the same suspicion about Gov. Susana Martinez. She’s taken a number of actions over her two terms that have seemed to be more about piling up sound bites for somebody else’s policy checklist than what’s best for the state.
    Now she’s officially a lame duck. It may be hard for her to run for any higher office, not because of any lack of competency or accomplishments but because of the infamous Christmas party incident of 2015. (If you don’t remember this, please Google “Susana Martinez pizza.”)
    But she still could have political ambitions in a less obvious direction. We can watch to see how this plays out in the bills she chooses to sign or veto.
    It’s widely understood that New Mexico’s tax system could use a major overhaul. In order to do that, policymakers must be able to engage in give-and-take, which means some taxes may go down and others may go up. Gov. Martinez’s inflexibility on raising any taxes has looked like she wants to preserve her anti-tax bragging rights, not like she wants to solve the problem.

  • Irish dance fundraiser set for Saturday

    Belisama Irish Dance School will host a fundraiser from 2-4 p.m. Saturday at the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos, 1738 North Sage St., Los Alamos.
    The lively afternoon will include ceili dancing (Irish social dance), live music, a short Irish dance demonstration and refreshments to help fund the Belisama Irish Dance Company’s future performances and new costumes. A Girl Scout Fun Patch will be offered for those Girl Scouts joining the fun.
    Special guests Billy Turney and Lucinda Sydow of Chili Line Accordions will provide traditional tunes in a fun environment for the whole family.
    Tickets are $10 for children, $15 for adults, and $50 for families with four or more members (plus a young guest). Ages 4 and under are free. Call 795-8011 for tickets or stop by CB Fox in Los Alamos.

  • Drawing and painting class March 4-5

     Artist and instructor Lisa Coddington will teach a two-day workshop on drawing and watercolor using botanical and natural subjects at the Los Alamos Nature Center March 4 and 5.
    This class, made possible by Pajarito Environmental Education Center, is appropriate for all skill levels to refine skills and enjoy the creative process.
    The workshop will run from 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. March 4, and 1-4 p.m. March 5.
    Register to learn techniques for creating realistic, still life, nature-inspired art.
    Participants will explore pencil and watercolor techniques that portray plants and animals in this hands-on workshop. With easy-to-understand demonstrations and master artist examples, Codedington will work to reinforce confidence in creating dimensional Autumn-themed subjects.
    A minimum of eight students are required for the class, so those interested in the workshop are encouraged to register on the PEEC website by March 1. Otherwise, the class will be canceled if there is not enough interest.
    Artist-instructor Coddington earned her master of art degree at Syracuse in illustration. She has illustrated a children’s book and has received commissions by regional and national firms for her artwork and art instruction. Her whimsical characters have been licensed for ornaments and are also featured on greeting cards.

  • Latest wilderness plans draw fire from N.M. ranchers

    BY SUSAN MONTOYA BRYAN
    Associated Press

  • Manhattan Project NHP at Los Alamos seeks volunteers

    Volunteers are needed to help get the Manhattan Project National Historical Park at Los Alamos off and running.
    At least eight to 10 new volunteers are needed, according to District Interpretive Park Ranger Kirk Singer.
    The volunteers would work about three to four hours or more per week working the visitor’s center, or work on building more programs, such as planning guided ranger walks on the planned trails that will skirt through the park, Singer said.
    “This is the fun part, because it’s all new to all of us,” Singer said. “This is completely new every day.”
    The park was officially established in November 2015. The park preserves three sites where work on the atomic bomb was completed: Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and Hanford, Washington.
    Federal officials said in 2015 the park will not glorify war or nuclear weapons, but will tell the story of the three historical sites from a range of perspectives, including the cities in Japan where two nuclear bombs were dropped in 1945.

  • Reward offered for info on burglary

    Police are offering a $250 reward for information that will lead to the arrest and conviction of whomever burgled the Beall’s Department Store at 610 Trinity Drive.
    The suspect, gained access into the store between 2:30-3 a.m.  Monday morning by throwing a rock through one of the store’s display windows.  
    Surveillance cameras in the area  reportedly show one young male entering the store, running in, and then quickly running back out. All that appeared to be taken was one bra.
    “So far, we don’t think anything was disturbed,” Store Manager Valerie De Mello said. “We’ve been here a long time, and nothing like this has ever happened.”
    When the store opened Monday morning, neighboring merchants stopped by to see if she was OK.
    Police are currently looking through area surveillance camera footage to see if a suspect can be identified.

  • ‘Power of Pets’ to help animals

    Three Los Alamos boys have found a way to help the community through their love of skiing and pets.
    Aidan Ortiz, Stephen Boone and Jackson Boone hope to get many pets adopted and cared for through their love of skiing and ski racing.  
    The three have started a fundraiser event with the Pajarito Mountain Ski Area called the “Power of Pets.”
    The skiing event and competition for the whole family is set for March 5 on Pajarito Mountain.
    Proceeds raised at the event will go toward helping the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter.
    “This is about having fun learning how to ski and do racing,” Ortiz said. “It’s also about raising money for the animal shelter and finding homes for cats and dogs.”
    Attendees of the event can purchase a token for $3. Attendees can buy as many as they want, and each token represents one run down the hill. At the top, participants give one token to someone to race. Each participant and group will get their scores, names and times documented and announced.
    All money raised at the event goes to the animal shelter. Racers will also have the option of getting a group shot taken at the event for a fee.  

  • Water, sewer rates may go up by summer

    Los Alamos residents may see an increase in their water and sewer rates this summer.
    Officials from the Department of Public Utilities have had at least three meetings with the Board of Public Utilities over the rate increases. The department is proposing an 8 percent increase in the water rate and an 8 percent increase in the sewer rate.
    The reason for the proposed increase is to help replace the county’s aging water distribution infrastructure.
    “We are focusing on some of the capital replacement needs in our system that we have projected out over the next 15 to 20 years,” DPU Manager Tim Glasco said. “We feel we are going to be needing this additional revenue just to take care of some of these more pressing needs.”
    Part of the problem the DPU faces has to do with how fast Los Alamos was built. Unlike many U.S. towns and cities, Los Alamos and White Rock were created almost instantly – along with most of it’s water distribution system.
    The department is looking to replace the White Rock waste treatment facility at some point in the near future.
    “Unlike other cities, that grow over a period decades where things wear out and there’s a kind of a natural turnover, we have a little more of a logjam here,” Glasco said.