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Today's News

  • WR Complex opens Thursday

    Los Alamos County Council Chair David Izraelevitz and White Rock Senior Center Coordinator Annie Bard cut the ribbon on the new White Rock Municipal Complex Thursday, a project that has been years in the making.
    Accompanying them were Glenn Lockhart, member of the White Rock Master Implementation Committee; Project Manager Anthony Strain, Los Alamos Senior Services Director Pauline Schneider and County Councilor Chris Chandler.
    The complex’s Senior Center now includes a kitchen for hot meals, as well as ADA compliant restrooms and more space for recreation and activities. The renovations cost about $3.96 million and was one of the last projects in the White Rock Master Plan.
    “We are extremely excited to open up this beautiful expansion” Strain said.
    The improvements to the center include, new interior floor plans and finishes, new utilities and mechanical/electrical equipment, new ADA restrooms, window and doors, improved grading and drainage, fresh landscaping, and a new commercial kitchen and 1,200 more square feet of new space.
    The exterior has been refurbished with new tuck pointed masonry and fresh colors.

  • New Mexico governor plans meeting with US Health Secretary

    SANTA FE (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez plans to meet with Health and Human Services Sec. Tom Price during her visit to Washington, D.C.
    A spokesman for the second-term GOP governor says she traveled Thursday to the nation's capital to participate in meetings with other governors, including a group meeting at the White House with Donald Trump.
    Spokesman Michael Lonergan offered few details about the engagement with Price. New Mexico residents and state government have a lot at stake in the pending health care overhaul by Republicans in Washington.
    Nearly 15 percent of New Mexico's 2.1 million residents have enrolled in Medicaid since coverage was expanded in 2014 under the Affordable Care Act.
    About 45,000 New Mexico residents participate in the state's health insurance exchange.
     

  • Bureau awards contract for work on regional water system

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A federal agency has awarded a nearly $92 million contract for design and construction of portions of a regional water system in north-central New Mexico.

    The Bureau of Reclamation says the four-year contract with Boston-headquartered CDM Smith is for parts of the Pojoaque Basin Regional Water System.

    The bureau says the system was authorized under a 2011 federal law and will provide reliable, safe drinking water from the Rio Grande to several pueblos and Santa Fe County residents.

    According to the bureau, the project includes diversion works, storage, a treatment plant, pipelines, pumping plants and other facilities.

    The bureau says local and Native American-owned small businesses are expected to receive at least 30 percent of the work under the contract.

    CDM Smith has an office in Albuquerque.

  • Actor Shia LaBeouf ends streaming of anti-Trump installation

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Actor Shia LaBeouf is citing safety concerns in cutting the livestream from the political performance art piece that was installed in downtown Albuquerque just days ago.
    The actor informed his followers via social media Thursday that the stream was taken down after gunshots were reported in the area.
    He says the safety of participants was paramount.
    LaBeouf and two other artists on Saturday mounted a camera to a wall with the message "He will not divide us," referring to President Donald Trump. The artists encouraged people to go to the camera and repeat the phrase.
    LaBeouf was arrested in New York City last month after getting into an altercation with a man during the performance.
    He faces a misdemeanor assault charge has an April 4 court date.
     

  • 'Extremely critical' wildfire alert issued for 3 states

    AMARILLO, Texas (AP) — Firefighters in New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas are bracing for a busy day as unseasonably warm temperatures, gusty winds and low humidity are expected to create dangerous wildfire conditions.
    The Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma, says "extremely critical" fire conditions are expected Thursday in eastern New Mexico, western Texas and the Oklahoma Panhandle. The risk area covers 117,000 square miles and includes the cities of Roswell, New Mexico, and Lubbock and Amarillo in Texas.
    Forecasters say some areas could see temperatures in the 70s and 80s and wind gusts up to 65 mph.
    Critical fire conditions are also expected throughout Oklahoma, western Kansas and southeastern Colorado, and forecasters have issued red flag warnings discouraging any outdoor burning.
     

  • 7 Earth-size worlds found orbiting star; could hold life

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — For the first time, astronomers have discovered seven Earth-size planets orbiting a single nearby star — and these new worlds could hold life.

    This cluster of planets is less than 40 light-years away in the constellation Aquarius, according to NASA and the Belgian-led research team who announced the discovery Wednesday.

    The planets circle tightly around a dim dwarf star called Trappist-1, barely the size of Jupiter. Three are in the so-called habitable zone, the area around a star where water and, possibly life, might exist. The others are right on the doorstep.

    Scientists said they need to study the atmospheres before determining whether these rocky, terrestrial planets could support some sort of life. But it already shows just how many Earth-size planets could be out there — especially in a star's sweet spot, ripe for extraterrestrial life. The more planets like this, the greater the potential of finding one that's truly habitable. Until now, only two or three Earth-size planets had been spotted around a star.

    "We've made a crucial step toward finding if there is life out there," said the University of Cambridge's Amaury Triaud, one of the researchers.

  • College Board to boost SAT security to combat cheating

    PITTSBURGH (AP) — The firm that owns the SAT college entrance exam is boosting security worldwide following test-stealing and other cheating in recent years.

    The College Board said it's reducing the number of international testing dates from six per year to four for the 2017-18 and 2018-19 school years. It says the move will reduce opportunities for test content to be stolen.

    The New York-based college entrance exam provider announced Wednesday that it is taking steps to prevent past cheaters from retaking tests. In addition, it says it will alert law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad of companies and people it suspects of illegally obtaining test content.

    Other planned reforms include an increase in audits of test centers worldwide and steps to make it easier for students and educators to anonymously report suspected cheating.

    "We are unwavering in our commitment to SAT test security and we will continue to confront any efforts to undermine it, including the unauthorized disclosure of test questions and test forms," Peter Schwartz, the College Board's chief administrative officer and general counsel, said in a written statement.

  • Trump administration to lift transgender bathroom guidance

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration will revoke federal guidelines that tell public schools to let transgender students use bathrooms and locker rooms matching their chosen gender identity, the White House said Wednesday.

    The decision would be a reversal of an Obama-era directive advising public schools to grant bathroom access to students in line with their expressed gender identity and not necessarily the gender on their birth certificate.

    White House spokesman Sean Spicer said Wednesday that the previous administration's guidelines were confusing and hard to implement and that new directives would be issued later in the day. A government official with direct knowledge of the plans told The Associated Press that the Obama-era guidance would be rescinded, though anti-bullying safeguards would not be affected. The official was not authorized to speak publicly about the plans and did so on condition of anonymity.

    Although the Obama guidance carried no force of law, transgender rights advocates say it was necessary to protect students from discrimination. Opponents argued it was overreach and said it violated the safety and privacy of all other students.

    Spicer said that the Departments of Justice and Education were working together on the new document.

  • Arts and Entertainment Calendar 2-22-17

    Art exhibits
    The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, 601 Eubank SE in Albuquerque, will host “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” through Oct. 8. This special exhibit, created by world renowned sculptor Jim Sanborn – best known for creating the encrypted “Kryptos” sculpture at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia – invites visitors to explore and study the recreations of the super secret experiments from the Manhattan Project’s atomic bomb program. The museum is open from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., 361 days a year. For information, visit nuclearmuseum.org, or call 505-245-2137.

    “Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography and Time.” Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 710 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe. Photographer Adriel Heisey re-photographed some of southwest’s most significant archeological sites that Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne, photographed in 1929. Exhibit runs through May.

  • Brave New Brass to play at Fuller Lodge

    The community is invited to enjoy a lunchtime performance by Brave New Brass during the Brown Bag Lunch March 1 at Fuller Lodge.
    Brave New Brass is a brass ensemble formed in Los Alamos, based on previous brass quintets organized by Dave and Deniece Korzekwa.
    The members of Brave New Brass have a broad interest in the music available for small brass ensembles of various combinations, and have been performing as a group in Los Alamos since 2012.
    Members of the group are all local Los Alamos musicians, with Elizabeth Hunke (French horn), Deniece Korzekwa (tuba), Dave Korzekwa (trumpet), Mandy Marksteiner (trumpet) and Bruce Warren (trombone). \As an applied mathematician at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Hunke develops and maintains the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model, CICE, which is used in numerous climate-modeling centers around the world. In her spare time she plays horn with several Los Alamos ensembles, and she is active in the Ninety-Nines, an international organization of women pilots that provides scholarship opportunities for women and aviation education in the community.