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Today's News

  • Take a challenging hike through Ancho Canyon

    Join the Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s Paul Arendt as he leads a hike through Ancho Canyon on Saturday. The group will meet at 9 a.m., and the hike is expected to last about 5-6 hours.
    There are many canyons to explore in White Rock, and the outing will give participants a chance to go with an experienced guide and a group of other hikers. The hike will begin down the Power Line Trail into lower Ancho Canyon, and then it will continue on to Ancho Rapids. From there the hike will proceed upriver to the Red Dot Trail. Along the way the group will examine several petroglyphs and a few old rock formations. The total distance is more than eight miles, with an elevation gain/loss of around 1,200 feet. A limited amount of bush whacking over uneven terrain will be required. The level of this hike is moderate to difficult.
    While it’s free to participate, the hike is limited to 15 adults, and advance registration is required. Meeting location details will be provided upon registration. For more information about this event and to register, visit PajaritoEEC.org or contact the organization at Programs@PajaritoEEC.org or 662-0460.

  • Update 3-19-15

    Lecture

    “Wetland Restoration in New Mexico Desert Grasslands” will be the topic of Karla Sator’s talk at 7 p.m. today. No advance registration required. Free. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org.

    Summer Concerts

    Igor and the Red Elvises will play a fundraiser for the Gordon’s Concert Series Saturday at the Posse Lodge. The show will start at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. No food or drink will be sold at the fundraiser.

    Warm Water Weekend

    The next Warm Water Weekend is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday at the Larry R. Walkup Center. The event will be from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and 1-5 p.m. Sunday.

    LAMS breakfast

    A regular weekly meeting of the Future Energy Resources Committee is scheduled for Tuesday. The meeting will be at 11:30 a.m. at the county’s Municipal Building.

    Future resources

    A regular weekly meeting of the Future Energy Resources Committee is scheduled for Tuesday. The meeting will be at 11:30 a.m. at the county’s Municipal Building.

    LARSO

    The Los Alamos Retired Senior Organization will meet at 12:15 p.m. Friday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.

  • New catalog system makes library resources easier to find

    With great advances in technology comes the increasing rush to keep up with these advances.
    Libraries are great users of these advances, because of their role as record keepers, catalogers, reference sources, and providers of free reading, listening and viewing materials.
    The Los Alamos County Library System is upgrading to a new Integrated Library System (ILS), in order to have the capacity to accommodate new resources, and to make all these resources easy to find.
    Get ready for a new library catalog, with user friendly features:
    • Mobile compatibility — search from your phone
    • Simple single-box searching, as in search engines
    • Searching all formats — books, downloadables, audiobooks, DVDs — simultaneously
    • Integration of e-books and e-audiobooks into the catalog
    • Fuzzy logic — gives good results even with spelling errors
    • Separate kids and teens catalogs

  • State Briefs 3-19-15

    Northern New Mexico sheriff target of new probe

    ESPAÑOLA (AP) — A northern New Mexico sheriff who replaced a sheriff convicted in a road-rage case is the target of a new investigation.
    Rio Arriba County officials said an investigation found that Sheriff James Luján recently made inappropriate comments to staff.
    The investigation comes after a pair of deputies claimed Luján used inappropriate slurs and discriminated against them for their political association with former Sheriff Thomas Rodella. Rodella was sentenced in January to 10 years in federal prison for abusing a driver in a bizarre, off-duty traffic stop that prosecutors described as a fit of road rage.
    The county gave Luján , elected in November, a letter telling him to use better judgment with staff.

    Social promotion bill tabled in Senate

  • On The Docket 3-19-15

    March 11

    Pamela J. Mackey was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of failing to turn correctly at an intersection. Defendant was fined $50 and ordered to pay $65 in court costs.

    March 12

    Heather Nordquist pled no contest to speeding six to 10 miles per hour over the speed limit. Defendant was sentenced to defensive driving school. Sentenced deferred until May 11. Defendant was also fined $65 in court costs.

    Thomas w. Vestrand pled no contest to speeding six to 10 miles per hour over the speed limit. Defendant was sentenced to community service. Sentenced deferred until May 11. Defendant was also fined $65 in court costs.

    March 13

    Ronald Smith pled no contest to having animals at large. Defendant was ordered to pay $60 in court costs.

    William D. Rice was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding six to 10 miles per hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $50 and ordered to pay $65 in court costs.

    David M. Palmer was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding six to 10 miles per hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $50 and ordered to pay $65 in court costs.

  • Fun Run is at Piñon Saturday

    Piñon Elementary will host its annual Annual Fun Saturday morning.
    The race, which will start at the school, 30 Grand Canyon Drive in White Rock, will begin at 9 a.m.
    Snacks and prizes will be offered at finish line to those taking part. Registration forms are available at the school.
    Proceeds from the fundraising event will benefit the PTO.

  • Lawmakers plug on despite hot times in the Roundhouse

    Legislative sessions often leave the tracks during the final days, but last week was weird even by those standards.
    There was the usual House snipping that the Senate isn’t hearing their bills and more than the usual strain between parties. Rumors of retaliation floated in the stale air. Personal slights or bad behavior provoked demands for apologies.
    Tensions escalated until a University of New Mexico regent’s confirmation exploded in mid-air. When a long-serving senator resigned abruptly a day later, it was almost anti-climactic.
    Through it all, they kept working. The process pauses but doesn’t stop. All that blather in bloggerdom about the “do-nothing legislature” just ain’t so.
    The regent showdown had been brewing for days.
    The governor nominated former District Attorney Matthew Chandler as UNM regent. The Senate Rules Committee approved the nomination, then asked that its record be expunged and hauled Chandler back in.
    If lots of raised eyebrows had a sound, we could have heard a whoosh.
    The three-way face-off among Chandler, Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez, and Sen. Daniel Ivey-Soto (all lawyers) shocked even veteran political reporters. Gone were the accustomed niceties observed in the Legislature, replaced by accusations flung back and forth.

  • Radiation damage evolution spotlighted in pair of reports

    A pair of reports from Los Alamos National Laboratory this week in the “Nature” journal “Scientific Reports” are helping crack the code of how certain materials respond in the highly-damaging radiation environments within a nuclear reactor.
    The goal of these efforts is to understand at an atomistic level just how materials develop defects during irradiation, and how those defects evolve to determine the ultimate fate of the material.
    “The new insights provided by these studies will aid in both predicting and designing materials for improved performance and ultimately cost savings for nuclear energy production,” said Blas Uberuaga, lead author of one of the reports.
    Together, these results highlight the complex behavior of defects even in the simplest of materials. Further, “they provide insight into how defects evolve, properties that must be accounted for in predicting the performance of materials under irradiation,” said Enrique Martinez Saez, lead author of the second report.
    The first report is “The relationship between grain boundary structure, defect mobility, and grain boundary sink efficiency,” which was authored by Uberuaga, Martinez Saenz, Louis Vernon and Arthur F. Voter.

  • Lottery bill is a bad gamble for students

    Responsible parents would never gamble with their child’s college savings account.
    Yet that is precisely what the New Mexico Lottery is proposing to do with the Lottery Scholarship, which serves as the college fund for many New Mexico students from low- and middle-income families.
    The New Mexico Lottery is attempting to pass Senate Bill 355, which would eliminate the requirement that a minimum of 30 percent of lottery revenues be dedicated to the scholarship fund. This requirement was enacted in 2007, based on a proposal by Think New Mexico.
    Prior to that time, there was no minimum percentage that the lottery had to deliver to the scholarship fund. The lottery was required to dedicate at least 50 percent of revenues to prizes, but once that requirement was met, the lottery paid its operating costs and sent whatever was left over to the scholarship fund.
    As a result, scholarships received an average of only 23.76 percent of lottery revenues a year from 1997-2007.
    Fortunately, the legislature enacted the 30 percent requirement, and it has resulted in an additional $9 million a year going to the scholarship fund.

  • Budget committee has good forecast

    Some interesting economic facts about Los Alamos County were revealed at a recent budget session by the Los Alamos School Board.
    The findings are related to the board’s the 2014-15 Budget Committee’s fact finding into its preparation for district’s next school budget.
    At the budget committee’s opening session a few weeks ago, committee members made a public invitation for leaders from the county’s various economic sectors, which included Los Alamos National Laboratory, the real estate market, the county and other areas, to come to this week’s meeting to give presentations and insights into the community’s economic well being.
    It is hoped the series of presentations will help the committee down the road in its plan to reorganize budget priorities amid predictions that state funding for the budget is generally going to be the same amount the Los Alamos Public Schools received last year.
    This year, LAPS predicting the school system will receive about $34 million, which includes the $8 million in annual funding the district receives from the U.S. Department of Energy.