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Today's News

  • Be There calendar 7-16-15

    Today
    Science on Tap: From Trinity Test to Artificial Joints: How Computational Mathematics Has Transformed Our World (1945-2015). Speaker will be Nathaniel Morgan. 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room.

    Los Alamos Lions Club meets the first and third Thursday. 6 p.m. at 84 Barcelona Ave. in White Rock. For further information contact Mary Swickard at 672-3300 or Dennis Wulff at 672-9563.

    (This) Ability: Trisha Ebbert. Through Aug. 1 at the Portal Gallery.
    Friday
    Gentle Hikes with PEEC. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. 8:30 a.m. Free. Adults. Meet at the Nature Center and carpool to the trailhead. For more information, losalamosnature.org.

    Gordon’s Summer Concert Series. Stooges Brass Band. 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond. Free. For more information, visit GordonsSummerConcerts.com.
    Saturday
    Mesa de Cuba Badlands. 9 a.m. Join Patrick Rowe in the San Juan Basin Recreation area as to see petrified wood, iron concretions, hoodoos, slot canyons and more. Free. Advanced Registration required. More information at losalamosnature.org.

  • MOWW meeting to be Sheriff’s Posse Lodge

    The July meeting of the The Military Order of the World Wars will be at the annual barbecue picnic on July 21 at Los Alamos Sheriff’s Posse Lodge. The Guest speaker will be Rick Carver, a retired photojournalist.
    Carver grew up in Carmel, California, spent 6½ years in the United States Navy, and then spent 20 years in the restaurant business mostly in Las Vegas, Nevada.
    He took up photography and worked as a photojournalist in the field of human rights. He moved to Santa Fe after retiring from photojournalism in 2000. For the last six years have become involved with the Navy league New Mexico Council supporting the three New Mexico namesake submarines, the USS Santa Fe, in particular.
    He is the committee chairman for the USS Santa Fe Committee based in Santa Fe.
    The meeting will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by the 6:25 p.m. meeting and picnic. Carver’s talk will begin at 7:15 p.m. at the Los Alamos Sheriff’s Posse Lodge is located at 650 North Mesa Road. North Mesa Road is reached by driving north on Diamond Drive past the golf course continuing on Diamond Drive through the round-a-bout exiting to the North Mesa road, then continuing on North Mesa Road to the Posse Lodge.

  • Artist talk focuses on math-themed exhibit

    Artist Jean Constant, who has a reputation as an artist who bases much of his work on mathematical principles, will speak at 2:30 p.m. Saturday at the Mesa Public Library.
    The library will host a temporary exhibit of the SMART contest (Science and Math-based ART) in the Upstairs Meeting Rooms on Friday and Saturday, in conjunction with the Los Alamos ScienceFest. Constant’s talk will be about the work in that show, and about the math he uses to create his own work.
    Constant, who lives in Santa Fe, is an artist who works in a wide variety of media. He is also a lecturer, researcher and author in the field of visual communication, as well as being a reviewer for the American Mathematical Society. He is a member of the Bridges Math and Art organization, and a member of the International Information Visualization Society.
    His fascination with the art that comes from the creative visualization of mathematical principles has led him to create several series of works. Most recently he has challenged himself to create one image each day, using 12 different math visualization programs over the course of a year, in a project he calls 12-30. That work can be seen at jcdigitaljournal.wordpress.com.  
    Another recent series, called “Martematica,” uses imagery and data sent by the Mars Rover.

  • Casting call for next Missoula production

    There will be a casting call for the Missoula Children’s Theatre, starting at 9:30 a.m. Monday at Crossroads Bible Church.
    This year’s production is “The Jungle Book.” Missoula directors are Charlotte Rawls and Maria Norris.
    There will be more than 50 roles that will be cast for student entering the first through 12th grade.
    Parents and/or guardians must be with each child when registering and are required to  sign the permission form. All those who plan to audition should plan to attend the entire morning and, if selected, have an open calendar for the week of 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. July 20-24, and all day and evening July 25.
    The audition is free. Cost is $35 per child, ($5 discount for LAAC members) who is cast for the performance. Enrichment workshops are offered to all who audition at no cost. Sign-up for workshops will take place at the audition.
    The public performance will be 7 p.m. July 25 at Crossroads Bible Church.
    Tickets are available at the door, starting 6:30 p.m. for $10, $5 for ages 12 and under
    For more information, call 663-0477.
     

  • Event marks 70th anniversary of the test at Trinity Site

    Today marked the 70th anniversary of the test of “the gadget,” the payoff of the Manhattan Project during World War II.
    And nowhere was more intimately involved with it than Los Alamos.
    Much of the primary work on the world’s first nuclear weapon, the atomic bomb, which is widely credited as bringing an end to the war, was done at Los Alamos.
    On July 16, 1945, the first detonation of the atomic bomb was completed near Alamogordo at the Trinity Site.
    That test marked the beginning of the nuclear age and a new era of both energy generation and of warfare.
    Before dawn today, the Los Alamos Historical Society held a get-together at the Hans Bethe House on Bathtub Row to mark the occasion.
    Along with the gathering, the Historical Society sent out live tweets — excerpts from the journal of Jack Hubbard — during its “Dawn of a New Era” event. About 30 people attended the event, which started at 4:30 a.m.
    The event was the official kickoff of the 2015 ScienceFest, which continues through Sunday in and around Los Alamos.
    Hubbard, a meteorologist overseeing weather conditions of the test, had “a fascinating perspective” on the test, including the chosen date of July 16, which he thought was a poor choice based on the conditions in the area.

  • Chalk Walk pays tribute to local artist

    Sec Sandoval is one of Los Alamos’ most well-known artists. His watercolors of New Mexico landscapes can be viewed throughout the town and he has generously donated his works to many local organizations’ fundraisers and events.
    According to a 2009 story in Los Alamos Monitor, Sandoval studied art in Santa Fe and his education included oil painting. He was a technical illustrator for the U.S. Army Aggressor Center and his work has been shown in numerous locations in Los Alamos including the Fuller Lodge Art Center and Los Alamos National Bank.
    So it seems fitting to host an event that pays tribute to Sandoval’s contributions to the art world, as well as to the local community. As result, the Los Alamos Arts Council has sponsored, for the last four years, the Sec Sandoval Chalk Walk event. This year’s event will be from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday on Central Avenue in front of the Post Office.
    The event is part of MainStreet’s ScienceFest celebration. The Chalk Walk may pay homage to an artist, but participants do not need to be professional artists to enjoy decorating the pavement on Central Avenue. A little bit of imagination and creativity is all it takes.

  • Working past 65? Here’s what to know about Medicare

    If you plan to work past 65 and keep the health insurance you’ve had from your job, you’re likely to wonder what, if anything, you need to do about enrolling in Medicare.
    About one in six older Americans now remains in the workforce beyond what was once the traditional retirement age. And the number of older workers will only grow over time.
    One reason is that Social Security now requires you to be at least 66 to collect your full retirement benefits. Retiring earlier means a smaller Social Security check.
    Then, too, a number of 60-something workers continue to pursue their careers because they can’t afford to retire. And still others simply prefer to stay engaged and on the job.
    Whatever the reason for postponing your retirement, you still need to consider Medicare as you approach your 65th birthday and qualify for the health care coverage.
    First, you should visit with your company’s human resources manager to determine how your employer-provided insurance will fit with Medicare. That’s also true for anyone turning 65 and receiving health care through a working spouse’s group plan.
    Most workers will want to sign up for Medicare’s Part A, which usually has no monthly premium and covers hospital stays, skilled nursing, home health services and hospice care.

  • Fixing prison system

    New Mexico’s three-strikes law may be due for an update because, says Gov. Susana Martinez, the current law does not take enough violent criminals off the street.
    I’m all for protecting us from violent criminals, but I find our policies and attitudes toward prison — New Mexico’s and the nation’s — confusing and contradictory.
    What is prison for? Is it to punish? Is it, as the name “corrections” suggests, to reform? Is it just to get dangerous people off the streets?
    In recent years, states have outlawed the death penalty but increased the use of solitary confinement and enacted laws, like three strikes, that increase sentences.
    “Tough on crime” is still a fashionable attitude for some politicians, and it’s well known the U.S. maintains the highest incarceration rate in the world.
    The current population of New Mexico’s prisons is around 7,200, says the Corrections Department website. About 90 percent are male. Most, according to department public affairs officer Alex Tomlin, do not have a high school diploma or GED.
    Most, Tomlin said, are incarcerated for a second or subsequent offense, and most of those offenses were violent.

  • Tokyo Olympic venue shaping up as world's costliest stadium

    TOKYO (AP) — When the dust settles on the marquee venue for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, it could well be the most expensive sports stadium in the world.
    The latest cost estimate of 252 billion yen ($2 billion at current exchange rates) would push it beyond the current record-holder, the $1.6 billion MetLife stadium completed in 2010 for the New York Jets and Giants football teams.
    What is the money buying? The design of the stadium's ribbed roof on huge steel arches resembles a bicycle helmet. To support a natural grass field, the roof's southern end will be translucent to let in sunlight and underground will be soil ventilation and temperature control systems. Movable seats will bring the crowd closer for more intimate events, and this being Japan, the stadium will have earthquake-resistant features.
    While exchange rate fluctuations and inflation make comparisons tricky, it is safe to say that Japan's new National Stadium will likely to be the most expensive ever built, two sports economists told The Associated Press. The latest estimate was a 55 percent increase over an earlier one of 163 billion yen.

  • Hults, Krantz win flights

    Larry Hults won his flight on back-to-back days during recent Northern New Mexico Senior Men’s Golf Association (NNMSMGA) tournaments.
    On June 30, Hults shot a 77 gross score to win the third flight at the Santa Fe Country Club. His score was better than the first and second flight winners, as well.
    The next day, Hults shot an 81 gross at the Taos Country Club to win the third flight again.
    Ron Krantz also won his flight at Taos. He shot an 84 gross to win the second flight.
    Bob Quick was the first flight’s net winner with 70.
    Three other golfers from Los Alamos golfers had second-place finishes with their gross scores at Taos.
    Spike Jones (86), Don Pompeo (82) and Don Rokup (88) were the runners up in the second, third and fourth flights, respectively.
    Bob Villa also has a second-place finish at Santa Fe with an 88 gross score in the fourth flight.
    Jones shot a 61 net score at Santa Fe to finish second in the second flight.
    Fred Thomas, meanwhile, landed closest to the pin on the eighth hole.
    Los Alamos’ NNMSMGA tournament is scheduled for Sept. 9-10.