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Today's News

  • Atomic City Update: Passion and emotion make high school sports more fun

    As I was watching the World Series earlier this week, something caught my eye that was great to see. The players showed true, genuine emotion that rarely exists in the world of professional sports.

    It makes sports so much more fun when you can tell they players truly care about what they are doing. It’s the kind of emotion you often see out of high school athletes, who are so excited to succeed, or so disappointed to fail, that they wear those emotions all over their faces, and in their body language.

    Watching Yasiel Puig of the Los Angeles Dodgers slam his glove down in disgust after coming up short on a diving attempt at a catch, or Jose Altuve and Carlos Correa of the Houston Astros scream and jump up and down after hitting extra inning home runs is the kind of emotion I love seeing.  

    Some may perceive the actions of Puig as throwing an unnecessary tantrum, or the actions of Altuve and Correa to be showboating, but to me it shows how much they care and want to win a championship. It’s emotion that you wouldn’t see in a regular season game normally, where the stakes are so much lower. That’s one of the differences between high school sports and every other level of competition. In high school, you can see that kind of emotion every single day.

  • A family bond on the soccer pitch

    The role of most parents of high school athletes is to sit in the stands and cheer on the team. They scream the loudest when their son or daughter does something well on the field, and they are the first people to offer moral support if the team loses.

    The parents are a big part of the team, but they are separate from the day-to-day activities of the team.

    However, this is not the case for Ron Blue and his son Christopher. Ron Blue coaches the varsity boy’s soccer team at Los Alamos High School, the team for which his son Christopher plays forward.

    For the past three years, the two of them have had to set aside their familial bond during soccer season, when Christopher Blue becomes one of Ron Blue’s players. There are no special favors or promises of playing time. He has to work arguably harder than anyone on the team.

    “It has probably been harder on him than anything,” Ron Blue said. “Because I hold him to a higher standard than anyone, mainly because I don’t want anyone to question that he belongs on this team.”

    Christopher Blue has been a consistent starter for the Hilltoppers this year, scoring four goals and adding eight assists, making him the third-highest scoring player on the team.

  • Birth Announcements 10-29-17

    Here are the newest members of the community born at Los Alamos Medical Center:

    Oct 19: A boy, Leo Timothy Uhlenbrock, was born to Emily and Kyle Uhlenbrock.

    Oct. 20: A boy, Owen Iefan Griffith, was born to Lauren and Gareth Griffith.

    Oct. 22: A boy, Tycho Rook Lanza Williams, was born to Nina Lanza and Richard Williams.

  • Pet Talk: Your pets can get spooked, too

    Children and adults may love the spooky traditions of Halloween, but our pets are less likely to appreciate the costumes, masks and parties associated with Halloween night.

    Kit Darling, infection control coordinator at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, recommended a few tips to keep your pet safe this Halloween.

    “Keep candy secure from pets,” Darling said. “Many candies are toxic to pets, such as chocolates. Candies and gum containing the sugar-free sweetener xylitol are also toxic.”

    Additionally, lollipops and other candies with plastic wrappers can cause intestinal blockage if ingested, Darling said. Be sure to clean up candy trash and store candy on a high shelf to prevent pets from reaching it.

    Other items to keep away from your pets include candles, pumpkins, pumpkin seeds, corn, lights and electrical cords.

    These objects are a hazard if consumed or chewed on by your pet. If you suspect your pet has ingested a dangerous item, Darling recommended contacting the Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435 or your veterinarian.

    Pet owners may want to dress their pet for Halloween night, but this may not be the best idea. Darling said pets shouldn’t be dressed in costume unless you know they are comfortable wearing the outfit.

  • Pet of the Week 10-29-17

    Powerball didn’t work out for you this week. You picked the wrong color combo for your unicorn look. They closed the highway before you got through the construction zone.

    There’s bad luck all over.

    Here’s a tip.

    The puppy Morello over at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter could be the best thing that’s happened to you in quite awhile.

    His charm is his youth, and potential.

    A mixed breed with terrier traits, he’s a small puppy likely to reach medium proportions.

    He’s got a cute ear fold happening and appears genuinely interested in what comes next.

    He’s got some of his shots, not all, and he’ll need boosters.

    Consider making Morello part of your universe. Bad luck doesn’t last long when you’ve got a friend.

    Please contact the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter at 662-8179 or email at Police-psa@lacnm.us.
     

  • Frightful Delight
  • Halloween tips for pets

    If Halloween is spooky for you, just think of it from a dog’s perspective: Costumed creatures, sugary treats and things that go “boo” in the night — oh my. These simple precautions from the Santa Fe Animal Shelter, however, can make the festive event fun.
    • Watch out for candy. Chocolate in all forms can be very dangerous to dogs and cats. And some candies contain the artificial sweetener xylitol, which can also cause problems. Pumpkins and corn might not be life-threatening but can upset stomachs.
    • Lighted pumpkins are fun but be careful that Fido doesn’t knock over all your work and start a fire. And curious kittens run the risk of getting burned by candles.
    • Dress-up can be fun for critters, but not all of them love it as much as you do. Watch the stress level, and only put on costumes that don’t restrict movement or hearing or impede the ability to breathe, bark or meow. Consider a colorful bandanna if all else fails.
    • Keep dogs and cats in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. Too many strangers can be stressful.
    • If you can’t resist bringing your critter along for trick-or-treating, make sure he or she can be seen from the road.

  • Renowned cellist to perform with LASO

    Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra fans are in for a treat this year when the orchestra welcomes premier cello soloist Wendy Warner to the stage Nov. 4, at Crossroads Bible Church. 

    Together, with longtime friend and LASO Conductor David Chavez, they will present the Saint-Sens Concerto No. 1.

    Warner came to fame when she made her debut with the Chicago Symphony at 14. In 1990, she won the top prize at the Fourth Annual Rostropovich Competition four years later.

    Chavez first met Warner when he was playing with the then New Mexico Symphony Orchestra. At the time, she was a guest soloist, performing a cello concerto by Dvorak.

    “Wendy and I have sustained a wonderful friendship over the years, and I am lucky to have kept my relationship with her,” Chavez said.

    This season, Warner has performed with orchestras and musical groups in China and Peru. In the U.S. she has performed with symphonies in Wichita Kansas and other places in the U.S.

    When she’s not traveling, she teaches music at the Schwob School of Music in Columbus, Geogia.

  • Water regulators making waves as water grab flows

    When three members of the Interstate Stream Commission resign abruptly, we need to pay attention.

    When they point fingers at the State Engineer, we need to be worried. The two agencies are our water watchdogs.

    The ISC oversees New Mexico’s participation in interstate stream compacts, protects and develops the state’s water and does water planning. The State Engineer regulates water rights and serves as ISC secretary.

    The ISC has withered with an exodus of staffers blamed on both State Engineer Tom Blaine and the administration’s budget cuts. It’s an open secret in the water world that Blaine wants the traditionally independent ISC under his thumb.

    Blaine meanwhile has opened the gate to the state’s biggest water grab.

    The ISC in recent months has lost its director, Colorado River bureau chief, special projects bureau chief, general counsel, acting general counsel, and Middle Rio Grande Basin manager. It has just two senior staffers left.

    When Blaine hired Deborah Dixon in early 2015, she was senior vice president at Bohannan Huston, a major engineering firm. “Ms. Dixon is an outstanding engineer who has valuable experience working in water projects in New Mexico,” Blaine said.

    Blaine fired Dixon in June without a word to commissioners.

  • Volleyball heads to Albuquerque tonight

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper volleyball team got neither the win it needed or the help it needed to move up from the District 2-5A basement to get a home match.

    Los Alamos fell in three sets to Capital Saturday and the Espanola Valley Sundevils defeated the Del Norte Knights, relegating the Hilltoppers to the No. 5 seed in the district tournament, which starts tonight.

    The Hilltoppers will take on Del Norte's Knights in Albuquerque this evening. The winner of tonight's match will meet Espanola Valley, which ended up third in the 2-5A standings, Tuesday night in the valley.

    Los Alamos finished the regular season with a record of 5-15 and won just one regular season district match. Del Norte took both contests between the two teams, winning six of the seven sets they played against each other.