.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Football runs past Santa Fe High

    The Los Alamos High School varsity football team is off to its best start in a decade. After defeating Santa Fe High School 21-14 in the Hilltoppers’ homecoming game, the team’s record now stands at 4-2 heading into district play.

    Nothing about the most recent victory came easy, however, as it came down to the last possession and the final minutes.

    The first quarter was a defensive battle, as the teams traded turnovers on downs and struggled to move the ball past midfield. As the quarter drew to a close, Santa Fe appeared to have their best scoring opportunity of the game up to that point, with first and goal inside the 5-yard line. The Hilltopper defense was able to tighten and force a field goal attempt, which they blocked, keeping the game scoreless.

    Hilltopper running back Cade Yost changed that on the first play of the ensung drive, as he took a handoff to the left and ran 82 yards for a touchdown, outrunning the entire Santa Fe defense. After a successful extra point attempt, LAHS led 7-0.

    Santa Fe answered right back on their next drive, picking up big gains down the field and capping off the drive with a 1-yard touchdown run by quarterback Zach Russell, tying the game at 7-7.

  • New Mexico city may allow workers to carry concealed weapons

    ROSWELL (AP) — A southeastern New Mexico city is weighing whether to allow its employees to carry concealed weapons at work.

    KOB-TV in Albuquerque reports the Roswell City Council is scheduled next week to vote on a concealed weapons measure. Supporters say the new option will keep employees safe.

    Under the proposal, Roswell employees who complete requirements to obtain a concealed carry license will have the option to carry a gun.

    Nearby Eddy and Otero counties already allow their employees to carry a concealed weapon while on the job.

  • Money flows fast to GOP candidate for New Mexico governor

    SANTA FE (AP) — Republican U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce's campaign for governor has quickly raised $1 million as he battles in court for access to a separate chest of money he raised while serving in Congress.

    Pearce said in a news release Thursday that his campaign has received money from at least 930 contributors in less than three months. The campaign has at least $900,000 in cash on hand ahead of the 2018 primary and general elections.

    At the same time, the seven-term congressman and his approach to public land issues have come under pointed criticism in an advertising blitz from an alliance of five nonprofit advocacy groups. Pearce campaign spokesman Greg Blair dismissed the criticism as the work of liberal-leaning special interest organizations with a radical agenda.

    Two-term Republican Gov. Susana Martinez cannot run for re-election in 2018, and Pearce so far is the only contender for the GOP nomination. Candidates for the Democratic nomination include U.S. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham, state Sen. Joseph Cervantes and former media industry executive Jeff Apodoca.

  • Einstein proof: Nobel winners find ripples in the universe

    By  SETH BORENSTEIN and JIM HEINTZ, Associated Press

    WASHINGTON (AP) — For decades astronomers tried to prove Albert Einstein right by doing what Einstein thought was impossible: detecting the faint ripples in the universe called gravitational waves. They failed repeatedly until two years ago when they finally spotted one. Then another. And another. And another.

    Three American scientists — including one who initially flunked out of MIT — won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday that launched a whole new way to observe the cosmos. Sweden's Royal Academy of Sciences cited the combination of highly advanced theory and ingenious equipment design in awarding Rainer Weiss of the Massachusetts Institute of

    Technology and Barry Barish and Kip Thorne of the California Institute of Technology.

    "It's a win for the human race as a whole. These gravitational waves will be powerful ways for the human race to explore the universe," Thorne told The Associated Press in a phone interview.

  • Geology outing Oct. 14 with local geologist

    Local geologist Patrick Rowe will lead an outing Oct. 14 to the Cabezon Peak area in search of geological treasures at two sites.

    Participants can expect to find minerals and marine fossils at the windmill site, and Shark’s Tooth Ridge is aptly named for the fossilized teeth from five species of Cretaceous Period sharks that the group will find.

    This program is organized by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center. Space is limited.

    The windmill site lies roughly between Cabezon peak and the Ojito Wilderness, where the group will be collecting nodules containing calcite crystals and fossil gastropods and ammonites.

    The nodules in this area often contain open pockets with beautiful calcite and every now and then barite crystals. The calcite crystals are found within some very large, partially buried and highly weathered concretions.

    To collect them, participants should be ready to do some digging in loose sand to expose the concretions. Once exposed, use prying tools and hammers to take apart the concretions while keeping an eye out for calcite.

  • State Archaeology Fair set for Oct. 14

    SANTA FE — Would-be archaeologists can be part of a mock excavation at the Oct. 14 New Mexico Archaeology Fair held this year in Taos at the Millicent Rogers Museum.

    Presented by the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division, Department of Cultural Affairs, the fair is a chance for children and adults to experience activities associated with cultures that trace their origins back thousands of years. At the same time, they can learn techniques developed over the last 150 years that have helped people better understand the lives of some of New Mexico’s earliest inhabitants.

    “The mock dig is new to the fair this year,” said State Archaeologist Michelle Ensey, who also is the deputy State Historic Preservation Officer at HPD. “We’re conducting the excavations using some of the same tools archaeologists use to excavate prehistoric and historic sites.”

    The fair runs from 10 a.m.–4 p.m. and admission is free. The museum is hosting the event and will be open during the fair, which also features the Taos Archaeological Society, state Office of Archaeological Studies, Archaeological Society of New Mexico and the New Mexico Archaeological Council. Several HPD archaeologists and cultural resource professionals will be on hand.

  • Fun, food and gifts at PEEC-nic

    The Pajarito Environmental Education Center invites the public to take part in its fall party at the Los Alamos Nature Center from 1-3 p.m. Oct. 15. PEEC’s annual membership meeting, called PEEC-nic, is open to the public and it’s free!

    To celebrate PEEC has special activities planned, including hands-on activities for kids and adults, a chance to meet PEEC’s live animals, delicious desserts, and sun viewing through PEEC’s solar telescope, with the help of a local astronomer.

    The 2 p.m. planetarium show will be free for PEEC. The first 100 member families will receive a special, one-of-a-kind collectors gift.

    If you’ve been interested in PEEC membership or volunteering at the nature center, this is a great time to find out more.For more information about this and other PEEC events, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Concert pianist to play Friday

    The Los Alamos debut of concert pianist Natasha Stojanovska will be at 7 p.m. Friday in the Sanctuary of the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos, 1738 North Sage St.

    The performance is free to the public.

    Stojanovska, a Macedonian native, is a true world-class artist and has just moved to Los Alamos.

    She has performed solo and chamber music recitals in France, Portugal, Macedonia, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Romania, South Korea, Haiti, and the United States.

    Her performances have been broadcast on radio and television.

    Those who love piano repertoire will not want to miss her solo performance.

    On the program are pieces from Bach, Schubert, Chopin, Rachmaninoff, and one of Stojanovska’s.

  • Biological clock finds by 3 Americans earn Nobel prize

    NEW YORK (AP) — Three Americans won a Nobel Prize on Monday for discovering key genetic “gears” of the body’s 24-hour biological clock, the mechanism best known for causing jet lag when it falls out of sync.

    Problems with our body clock have also been linked to such disorders as sleep problems, depression, heart disease, diabetes and obesity. Researchers are now trying to find ways to tinker with the clock to improve human health, the Nobel committee said in Stockholm.

    It awarded the $1.1 million (9 million kronor) Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Jeffrey C. Hall and Michael Rosbash, who worked together at Brandeis University in Massachusetts, and Michael W. Young of Rockefeller University in New York.

    They “were able to peek inside our biological clock” and discover details of its inner workings, the Nobel citation said.

    The work, done in fruit flies and dating back to 1984, identified genes and proteins that work together in people and other animals to synchronize internal activities throughout the day and night. Various clocks in the brain and elsewhere in the body, working together, regulate things like sleep patterns, eating habits and the release of hormones and blood pressure.  Such 24-hour patterns are called circadian rhythms.

  • Jemez Mountain Scenic Byway alive with fall colors

    Jemez Village is gearing up for its annual Jemez Mountain Trail Sale, which will happen at the same time people start coming from all over to see the fall foliage on the 132-mile Jemez Mountain Scenic Byway.

    This year, the sale will take place from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 21-22.

    The village tries to hold the sale when the leaves are turning and the fall colors are at their peak. 

    The massive yard sale is more than 26 miles long. It starts at San Ysidro and continues past La Cueva.

    The Jemez Mountain Scenic Byway is more than 163 miles long and starts in Bernalillo and ends at Bandelier National Monument. 

    The Jemez Mountain Trail Sale is an annual event where food vendors, artists, craftsmen and yard sale sellers can set their wares out on the side of NM 4 for shoppers and sightseers.

    Items for sale range from handcrafted items, jewelry and artwork to used cars, furniture, books, appliances and knick-knacks. Pottery, art and handcrafted items from Jemez Pueblo along with fundraiser tables set up by churches, schools, and other organizations may also be available.

    In addition to the sales and bargains along the way, the view will be great everywhere one looks.