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Today's News

  • Pastor: New Mexico shooting suspect showed no warning signs

    CLOVIS (AP) — The suspected teen gunman who opened fire inside an eastern New Mexico public library, killing two people and wounding four, appeared to be turning his life around, volunteering at church and never missing a service, the youth's pastor said Tuesday as the small farming city of Clovis struggled to understand the violence.

    Living Word Church of God Pastor David Stevens said the teen had been troubled but started attending his church more than three months ago and gave no indication that anything was wrong. He said the teen, who was dating his daughter, had been searching for "inner peace" and making strides in his life.

    Stevens found out that the teen was the suspect when his daughter rushed to the Clovis-Culver Public Library after receiving a text from a friend with a video of person who looked like her boyfriend being led away in handcuffs by police.

    After the girl arrived with her mother, they were led to authorities and interviewed by a detective who identified the boy as the suspected shooter and took her cellphone, looking for any messages between the teens that might help in the investigation, said the mother, Paula Stevens. The pastor said police found nothing.

  • The Latest: Facebook, Google to match Harvey donations

    HOUSTON (AP) — The Latest on Tropical Storm Harvey (all times local):

    2:55 p.m.

    Facebook and Google are matching donations to people affected by Hurricane Harvey, the tech giants announced on Tuesday. Facebook says it will match every dollar raised through its platform, up to $1 million, for the Center for Disaster Philanthropy's Hurricane Harvey Recovery Fund. The money will support local recovery and rebuilding efforts. U.S. Facebook users are getting a message at the top of their news feed on how to donate.

    Google says it is matching $1 million in donations to the American Red Cross. To donate, go to https://www.google.org/harvey-relief/ . The company also matched donations from employees, and said Tuesday it donated $750,000 between its nonprofit arm, Google.org, and employee contributions to organizations such as the American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity and Save the Children.

    ___

    2:30 p.m.

    Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner confirmed that police Sgt. Steve Perez has died after he became trapped in his patrol car as he was driving to work.

    The Houston Chronicle has reported that the 30-year officer was heading to work Sunday when he became trapped in high water on Interstate 45 in north Harris County and then couldn't get himself out of his car.

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  • Trump: 'All options are on table' after North Korea launch

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump sought Tuesday to reassert an American military threat against North Korea, saying that "all options are on the table" in response to its launch of a missile over close U.S. ally Japan.

    In a terse, written statement, Trump said that North Korea's missile launch "signaled its contempt for its neighbors, for all members of the United Nations and for minimum standards of acceptable international behavior."

    "Threatening and destabilizing actions only increase the North Korean regime's isolation in the region and among all nations of the world," Trump said. "All options are on the table."

    Trump later told reporters, "We'll see, we'll see" when asked what he would do. Trump, accompanied by first lady Melania Trump, was departing the White House to survey storm damage in southeast Texas.

    North Korea on Tuesday fired a midrange ballistic missile designed to carry a nuclear payload. It flew over Japan and splashed into the northern Pacific Ocean, officials said, as Washington and South Korea were conducting war games nearby.

  • Houston to open more mega-shelters to house flooded families

    By NOMAAN MERCHANT and JUAN LOZANO, Associated Press

    HOUSTON (AP) — Houston officials will open two or three more mega-shelters to accommodate people who continue to arrive at the overflowing George R. Brown Convention Center seeking refuge from Harvey's record-breaking flooding, Mayor Sylvester Turner said Tuesday.

    The center already held more than 9,000 people, almost twice the number officials originally planned to house there, Turner said.

    "We are not turning anyone away. But it does mean we need to expand our capabilities and our capacity," Turner said. "Relief is coming."

    More than 17,000 people have sought refuge in Texas shelters and that number seemed certain to increase, the American Red Cross said.

    City officials have made a formal request with the Federal Emergency Management Agency for more supplies, including cots and food, for additional 10,000 people, which he hopes arrive no later than Wednesday, the mayor said.

    Also on Tuesday, the Houston Chronicle reported that a city police officer drowned in his patrol car as he was driving to work. The newspaper, citing three unidentified department officials, said the 30-year officer was heading to work Sunday when he became trapped in his car in high water on Interstate 45 in north Harris County.

  • B61-12 continues to meet qualification test schedule

    B61-12 continues to meet qualification test schedule

    The Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration and U.S. Air Force completed two qualification flight tests of B61-12 gravity bombs Aug. 8 at Tonopah Test Range in Nevada, the NNSA announced Monday.

    The non-nuclear test assemblies, which were dropped from an F-15E based at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, evaluated the weapon’s non-nuclear functions and the aircraft’s capability to deliver the weapon, NNSA officials said.

    These tests are part of a series over the next three years to qualify the B61-12 for service.

    The first qualification flight test occurred in March.

    The B61 was designed and engineered by Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1963 and is the oldest type of nuclear weapon in the stockpile. The weapon is undergoing a life extension program at Los Alamos to convert four versions of the warhead into a single modification with a new tail kit for added accuracy.

    If testing is successful, new version is scheduled to be produced in 2020.

  • New Mexico firefighters, Red Cross team deployed to Houston

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico firefighters and American Red Cross volunteers and staff were deployed to Houston to assist in Harvey relief efforts.
    Executive Director of the American Red Cross in New Mexico Kathy Segura-Salas says at least nine Red Cross workers from throughout the state are on their way, as well as two Emergency Response Vehicles containing food, water, blankets, cleanup kits, and other supplies.
    Las Cruces Fire Department spokesman Dan Trujillo says a six-member Swift Water Rescue Team left Monday for Houston.
    New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez activated Monday the state's Emergency Operations Center to help in the transfer of equipment and personnel that may be requested from Texas. Martinez also directed the state Transportation and Public Safety departments to waive overweight and oversize limits for vehicles transporting equipment to Texas.
     

  • Deadly shooting at library shakes New Mexico city

    CLOVIS (AP) — Authorities on Tuesday identified the gunman accused of opening fire inside a New Mexico public library as a 16-year-old high school student who they say killed a youth librarian and a second employee while wounding four people, including a 10-year-old boy. Witnesses said the teen seemed to fire randomly during the rampage.

    Nathaniel Jouett will face two counts of first-degree murder, four counts of assault with intent to commit a violent felony, four counts of aggravated battery with a deadly weapon and one count of child abuse, said Clovis Police Chief Douglas Ward. Investigators had not uncovered evidence that Jouett knew the victims, he said.

    The Associated Press generally does not identify juveniles accused of crimes but is identifying Jouett because of the seriousness of the crime and because authorities said they plan to file a motion requesting the case's transfer from the juvenile system to adult court.

    Ford said it was not immediately clear how Jouett obtained the weapons. The chief also said it is still unclear what prompted the violence Monday afternoon at the Clovis-Carver Public Library, saying investigators are still gathering evidence and conducting interviews to piece together what happened.

  • Locals collect donations for Harvey hurricane victims

    Los Alamos locals are collecting donations for victims caught in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, the slow moving, catastrophic hurricane that continues to cause destruction and loss of life in Houston and areas of Texas this week.

    Bankens Mountain Martial Arts Academy announced it will send baby supplies to the hurricane affected area Thursday.

    Academy officials are asking residents to drop off baby supplies at the Martial Arts Center at 172 Central Park Square or the Los Alamos Family YMCA at 1450 Iris Street by 2 p.m. Wednesday. Los Alamos Crossfit at 278 DP Road is also helping with donations.

    Bankens Mountain Martial Arts Academy owner Kevin Bankens said residents can donate up to 2 p.m., but no later.

    The academy is asking for donations of baby wipes, diapers, diaper cream, formula, blankets, swaddle blankets, pacifiers, warm clothes “and any other comfort items.”

    Bankens decided to get involved because he knows what the victims are going through, and has the experience to help.

    “I’m from that area, and my family was hit very hard during Katrina,” he said.

    Bankens was living in Santa Fe at the time, and managed to get three truckloads of supplies off to Katrina victims.

  • South Korea says North fires ballistic missile

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea fired an unidentified projectile from its capital Pyongyang that flew over Japan before plunging into the northern Pacific Ocean, officials said Tuesday, an especially aggressive test-flight that will rattle an already anxious region.

    Seoul's Joint Chiefs of Staff on Tuesday said the missile traveled around 2,700 kilometers (1677 miles) and reached a maximum height of 550 kilometers (341 miles) as it flew over the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido. The JCS said it is analyzing the launch with the United States and also that South Korea's military has strengthened its monitoring and preparation in case of further actions from North Korea.

    Japanese officials said there was no damage to ships or anything else reported. Japan's NHK TV said the missile separated into three parts.

    Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told reporters, "We will do our utmost to protect people's lives."

    The launch comes days after the North fired what was assessed as three short-range ballistic missiles into the sea and a month after its second flight test of an intercontinental ballistic missile, which analysts say could reach deep into the  U.S. mainland when perfected.

  • The Latest: Volunteers use dump truck to rescue 20 people

    HOUSTON (AP) — The Latest on Tropical Storm Harvey (all times local):

    3:55 p.m.

    Authorities say a woman has been killed in the Houston area when a large tree dislodged by heavy rains from Harvey toppled onto her trailer home.

    Montgomery County Sheriff's Office Captain Bryan Carlisle says that the woman was killed around noon Monday in Porter. Her husband has reported that she was napping when the tree fell. Porter Fire Department firefighters had to wade through chest-level water to evacuate the woman's husband, remove the tree and extract the body.

    Harvey made landfall in Texas late Friday as a Category 4 hurricane and has lingered just off the coast, dropping heavy rain as a tropical storm.

    3:25 p.m.

    Volunteers have used a dump truck to rescue about 20 people from a flooded Houston-area neighborhood.

    The rescue effort happened Monday after some residents of Sugar Land got a constable's attention to say they needed help to escape the waist-deep water. The officer managed to arrange a private truck.

    Several residents then used small rafts and air mattresses to float out to the vehicle. Children were handed from one person to another to be loaded into the back of the truck.