Today's News

  • Police Beat 9-30-16

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, served a court summons, or issued a citation.

    Sept. 13
    9:02 a.m. — Police reported that a 17-year-old Los Alamos male was the victim of criminal damage to property (less than $1000) at Diamond Drive.

    11:14 a.m. — Zachary Sanchez, 32, of Los Alamos was arrested on a magistrate court bench warrant at the Los Alamos police department. The original charge was aggravated driving while under the influence with a blood alcohol concentration of .16 or more at the intersection of Canyon Road and Rim Road in April.

    1:15 p.m. — Police reported that 15-year-old Los Alamos female was the victim of criminal sexual penetration: force/coercion at Trinity Drive.

    2:17 p.m. — Police reported that a 26-year-old Los Alamos woman was the victim of harassment.  

    Sept. 15
    7:45 a.m. — Shawn Trujillo, 19, of Chimayo was arrested on a magistrate court bench warrant in the 1600 block of Trinity Drive.

  • Meet county attorney candidates Oct. 6

    Members of the public are invited to meet the top candidates vying for the position of county attorney at a reception hosted by the County Council at 6 p.m. Oct. 6 in the Community Room at the Golf Course. Refreshments will be served.
    Becky Ehler recently retired as the county attorney.
    The position is appointed by the Council.

  • Walkup Aquatic Center to hold Pumpkin Splash

    It will be an “out of this world” Pumpkin Splash & Halloween Carnival at the Walkup Aquatic Center on Oct. 29.  
    Admission is $7 per person and limited to 150 space travelers. Admission includes diving into the pool to collect your pumpkin, flying over to the classroom for pumpkin decorating, then moving from one adventure to the next with space themed carnival games, a photo booth and crafts. The event is from 10 a.m.– 1 p.m. with the pumpkin retrieval beginning at 11 a.m.
    The 2016 Pumpkin Splash is a “Teal Pumpkin” event that offers food and non-food treat options to all participants.
    For more information contact the Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Division at 662-8170 or lacrec@lacnm.us. Registration is also available online at losalamosnm.us/rec. 

  • ‘Language of Bears’ talk set for Oct. 4

    Bears are incredibly intelligent animals who use vocalizations and body language to communicate.
    Join wildlife biologist Daryl Ratajczak at 7 p.m. Oct. 4 at the Nature Center for an exciting talk about the language of bears.
    Ratajczak will share photos, stories and data that explain how bears communicate in the wild. This is a free talk at the Los Alamos Nature Center.
    Ratajczak is a wildlife biologist for the U.S. Forest Service in the Santa Fe National Forest. Apex (top) predators and other large mega-fauna are his passion and specialty.
    Before he joined the Forest Service, Ratajczak managed a black bear rehabilitation, research and education facility outside Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
    He then went on to work for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and served as the big game program coordinator managing the state’s bear, deer and elk programs.
    He eventually became chief of wildlife for the state of Tennessee but found the “desk-life” didn’t suit him and decided to pursue his lifelong dream of living and working in the west.
    Ratajczak’s talk will be at the Los Alamos Nature Center at 2600 Canyon Road. The talk is free to attend, and no registration is required.

  • Espinoza supports transparency; opponent skirts campaign limits

    Dist. 59, House of Representatives, Candidate for Secretary of State

  • Espinoza’s false attacks cover up ties to corruption, extremism

    Candidate for Secretary of State

  • I encourage everyone to vote in favor of Question 1

    I am voting for county Question No. 1, to eliminate the office of sheriff in Los Alamos. I encourage everyone who believes in good government, strong public safety, and reduction of unnecessary risk, to do the same.
    Typically, a sheriff provides law enforcement in county, or rural, areas. The sheriff position in Los Alamos has no law enforcement duties, and Los Alamos has no county – only, or rural, land. All of the county land in Los Alamos is incorporated into the municipality of Los Alamos. There is not a square inch of just-county land for a sheriff in Los Alamos to stand on.
    Los Alamos became a municipal government in the 1960s. The County of Los Alamos had already been created  as a legal entity in 1949. When the Federal Government decided to no longer run Los Alamos as a Federal scientific base, in the 1960s, all of the county land was wholly incorporated into the municipality of Los Alamos.  Los Alamos remains the only city-county entity in New Mexico.
    While debating their preferred from of government, Los Alamos citizens got to choose who would provide law enforcement - a professional law enforcement agency (a police department), an elected sheriff, or both.

  • Subsidizing the cheese business

    Before you bite into your next green chile cheeseburger, pause for a moment to consider the importance of that chunk of cheese, not just to the taste of your burger but to our local economy.
    With 150 dairies averaging more than 2,000 cows each, New Mexico ranks ninth in the nation for milk production and fifth for cheese. The average New Mexico dairy ships 44 million pounds of milk a year worth nearly $6 million. Much of it goes to Southwest Cheeses in Clovis, which employs 300 people to turn 3.8 billion pounds of milk into 388 million pounds of cheese annually.
    According to NMSU’s Ag Science Center, dairy is the number one agricultural employer in the state, providing 12,524 jobs paying $600 million a year in wages. In 2014, the average dairy farm worker earned $47,811, compared to the state’s average mean wage of $42,230. At $1.5 billion, dairy is about tied with beef cattle for economic impact and together the two rival the oil and gas industry.
    But while it’s a big business, it’s not a particularly lucrative one. A milk cow eats 100 pounds of hay and grain every day. In return she produces six to seven gallons of milk. Dairy farmers live on the difference between the cost of her feed and the price of her milk, usually expressed as the cost vs. price per hundredweight of milk.

  • N.M. Senate leader focuses on budget, not crime bills

    SANTA FE  — New Mexico lawmakers grappled Thursday with how to address a major shortfall in revenues during the final hours before a special legislative session convenes, with no clear political pact yet for rewriting the state budget.
    Republican Gov. Susana Martinez called for the start of a special session today to resolve a stalemate with Democrats over how to fix the budget, and has added weighty criminal justice measures to the agenda – including a bill to reinstate the death penalty for convicted killers of police, children and corrections officers.
    Lawmakers at the helm of the Democratic-controlled Senate have criticized Martinez for not providing a detailed budget proposal, and gave indications that anti-crime initiatives may take a back seat to addressing a gaping budget deficit.

  • Customers to see gas rates decrease

    The 10-percent increase in water rates will be offset by a 10-percent decrease in gas rates.
    The Los Alamos County Council unanimously approved the new rate on Tuesday.
    The rate reduction will serve to draw down a high cash balance in the gas fund. Staff policy is to maintain $2 million in reserve. The balance currently stands at $6 million. The reduction will be implemented by reducing the fixed rate billing charge by 20 percent.
    Vice Chair Susan O’Leary objected to using the service charge as the mechanism for reducing rates.
    “I think you have policy that requires rates to cover cost of service. You have used this as justification to raise rates in other utilities, but ignore this logic in this instance,” O’Leary said. “There are other ways to address this that don’t involve rate adjustments that could cause problems down the road that could have been avoided.”
    O’Leary suggested that options such as sending customers a rebate would have been a better solution, and asked the board to reconsider this rate with that in mind.
    Councilor Steve Girrens proposed loaning the excess to the county’s cash-strapped utilities. The county charter requires that the utilities operate independently, but do allow loans between them.