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Today's News

  • Mosquitos that can carry Zika found in Otero, Hidalgo counties

    Mosquitos that can transmit Zika virus have been found in Otero and Hidalgo counties, the state health department announced Tuesday.

    This is the first time a species of mosquito that can transmit Zika virus has been located in this part of the state. There have been no identified human cases of Zika virus in either county.

    Zika virus can be transmitted to people primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito. The mosquitoes become infected when they feed on a person already infected with the virus.

    Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to other people through bites.

    Mosquito surveillance in New Mexico’s southern counties is part of an ongoing collaboration between the state health department and New Mexico State University.

    These recent discoveries bring the total number of counties in the state with mosquitos capable of spreading Zika to eight. Mosquitoes that can carry Zika virus have been trapped and identified in Doña Ana, Eddy, Chaves, Sierra, Lea, Luna and now Otero and Hidalgo counties.

  • Tremor shakes Los Alamos County

    UPDATED:

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory’s seismic network detected an extremely small earthquake today at 10:32 a.m. that did not disrupt lab operations, but the tremor was felt in areas across the community.

    "The event did not have any impact on Laboratory operations and there were no reports of anyone feeling the earthquake on Laboratory property," said LANL spokesman Kevin Roark.

    A laboratory seismologist  calculated a preliminary magnitude of 1.5 at a location about two kilometers, or 1.2 miles, west-northwest of the northwestern edge of the town of Los Alamos and at a depth less than one kilometer, Roark said.

    "This extremely small magnitude is typical for the vast majority of earthquakes in the vicinity of Los Alamos," Roark said. "Most are further away and deeper and are not felt by anyone. The area experiences this type of seismic activity near the eastern margin of the Jemez Mountains roughly once every 3-5 years."

    LANL Seismologist Richard Kelley said on social media he and others were gathering information as to its location and magnitude through emails and reports on social media. Kelley and Peter Roberts are asking the general public to email them to help them with their assessments.

  • Community offers assistance following tragic teen death

    Due to the recent tragic loss of Trevor Matuszak, of Los Alamos, Sunday, the community is is offering assistance with the understanding that there is a need of peer-to-peer support and community support. 

    The Los Alamos Teen Center, located at 475 20th St., will host teen support sessions put on by Mesa Vista from 3-6 p.m. Wednesday. This is an on-going service available at the Teen Center.

    Los Alamos Fire Station No. 3 will be opened to the community from 6-8 p.m. Wednesday and everyone is encouraged to come out to support those that may have been affected both directly and indirectly with this tragic event. There will be counselors and other support groups available to assist with the grieving process.

  • New Mexico student reading scores up, math stagnant

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico student reading tests scores across the state rose slightly, but math scores remain stagnant, according to results released Monday

    The new numbers show around 29 percent of students tested this spring are proficient or better in reading, and about 20 percent are proficient or better in math. That was a slight jump in reading scores from 2016 while math results fell .2 percentage points.

    Still, the results revealed that since the introduction of assessments developed by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC, less than a third of all New Mexico students are proficient.

    More than 80 percent of New Mexico public school students from grade 3 to 11 aren't proficient in grade-level math.

    And around 71 percent aren't proficient in reading.

    The tests, administered by New Mexico and 10 other states, are designed to show how well schools helped students from grades 3 to 11 meet Common Core standards.

    New Mexico Education Secretary Christopher Ruszkowski said tests with more rigorous standards are what the 21st Century economy will require and all schools have the choice to make improvements.

  • LA resident convicted of killing wife released from prison

    Jack Markham, 64, was released from prison Monday, nine years after killing his wife in their Los Alamos home.

    In 2008, Markham shot his wife, Robin Markham, three times in the chest Aug. 4, 2008, inside their Los Alamos home. In May 2009, he was convicted of second-degree murder.

    Markham did not explain in court why he killed his wife. He received 15 years with five suspended followed by two years mandatory probation and he must pay restitution for his wife’s funeral expenses upon his release.

    “He was supposed to serve 10, and I believe it’s only been nine, and I’m a little disappointed,” Robin Markham’s friend Geri Perrault said Monday. “I’m curious myself, as to why he’s being let out. I don’t have any good comments to say about that, nothing good to say.”

    Articles in the Los Alamos Monitor at the time indicated that a struggle between the Markhams took place before the shooting. Evidence presented at the 2008 trial detailed that Robin Markham was missing several fingernails and that there were bruises found on several parts of her body.

    “She did everything for that man,” Perrault said. “I still don’t know why, even after talking with his family, why he did what he did, he never did say.”

  • Police Beat 7-23-17

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, served a court summons, or issued a citation.

    July 12
    1:30 a.m. — LAPD reported an individual that was taken to the Los Alamos Medical Center due to a dog bite.

    7:30 a.m. — Los Alamos Police Department investigated a report of shoplifting at Smith’s Marketplace.

    July 13
    7:52 a.m. — Celso Ramos, 37, of Santa Cruz, was arrested on a magistrate and district court warrant.

    8:37 a.m. — LAPD reported a golf ball thrown at the entrance window of the Barranca Mesa pool.

    2:12 p.m. — LAPD pursued a reckless driver and discontinued due to the safety of others.

    5:39 p.m. — Los Alamos Police Department arrested a male involved in a car accident for driving on an invalid/revoked license.

    6:30 p.m. — LAPD cited an individual for public disturbance.

    7:40 p.m. — Malcom R. Torres, 23, of Santa Cruz, was arrested for driving on a suspended or revoked license.

  • On The Docket 7-23-17

    June 6
    Judith Clendenen-Fisher was found guilty of improper regulation of weeds, brush piles, refuse and rubbish, as well as failure to appear in court. The sentence was deferred and the defendant must pay $120 in court costs.

    Mary Greene was found guilty of failure to obey a traffic signal. Defendant was fined $50 and must pay $65 in court costs.

    Elaine Guenette was found guilty of speeding six to 10 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $50 and must pay $65 in court costs.

    Jan Tice was found guilty of speeding six to 10 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $50 and must pay $65 in court costs.

    Donald Finley was found guilty of speeding six to 10 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $50 and must pay $65 in court costs.

    June 8
    Kristan Berg was found guilty of an improper turn, failure to pay and failure to appear in court. The defendant was fined $75 and must pay $130 in court costs. The defendant’s license was also suspended.

    Henry Flores was found guilty of following another vehicle too closely, which resulted in an accident, and was sentenced to community service.

  • UNM-LA to host summer programs to youth

    This year, more than 125 students will participate in the annual Summer Programs for Youth at the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos.

    Last week, the campus hosted elementary school age students. In the Adventures at the University program, students in grades 1-3 experienced a different field of exploration each day, including music, art, engineering, chemistry in the lab, and general chemistry. Students in grades 4-6 selected specific topical classes including computer programming with Minecraft, Robotics with Lego MindStorm kits and a class investigating Chemistry in the Kitchen.

    Now in its 29th year, the Summer Program for Youth at UNM-LA provides exciting, hands-on, activity-based learning sessions focusing on science, technology, engineering, art and math (STEAM) for students in first– 10th grades.

    During the last week in July, UNM-LA will host about 60 teenagers in grades seven-10. From Forensics to Engineering, Game Design and Comics, students will explore STEAM through hands-on activities.

    “We try to provide a selection of subject matter and age-appropriate learning experiences,” says Dr. Gabe Baca, director of Community Education. “All of the classes have been popular and well-received, due to the outstanding teachers and volunteers who have provided assistance for us at every step.”

  • Sheriff investigate corruption? Makes no sense

    Corruption: dishonest or illegal behavior especially by powerful people (such as government officials or police officers) (Merriam-Webster Dictionary)

    My fellow councilor Pete Sheehey has proposed a council resolution to more expansively define the roles and responsibilities of the Los Alamos County Sheriff’s Office. The last paragraph of his resolution is very troubling, as it would give the Sheriff the power to perform a criminal investigation should the police department be deemed, in the sheriff’s “reasonable” opinion, to be compromised. I see this expansive power as a fatal flaw in his proposal. To understand my objections, let’s dig deeper into the implications of this role.

  • A word in praise of drilling rigs

    I like drilling rigs. They’re noisy, dirty and dangerous, which appeals to the teenage boy in me. And I’ve always felt the big flag on the derrick is a nice touch. As a combination of hard work, technical savvy and high-stakes optimism, oil and gas drilling is the quintessential American enterprise.

    As with so much of the modern world, we invented it. Years ago, I met an oilman who had a photo of the famous Spindletop Geyser on his office wall, and he was happy to share the story. On Jan. 10, 1901, Lucas No. 1 in southeast Texas struck “black gold” at just 1,020 feet down. The gusher spewed a fountain of crude 150 feet in the air, blowing nearly a million barrels of oil over the landscape before settling down to pump a steady 10,000 barrels a day. As hundreds of derricks sprouted around that lone well on Spindletop Dome the price of oil dropped from $2 a barrel to less than a nickel and the American Century was underway.