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Today's News

  • Update 6-21-15

    Father's Day

    The Los Alamos High School golf program will hold a Father’s Day equipment sale at the old Los Alamos Golf Course pro shop. The sale will go from 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

    Council

    Los Alamos County Council will meet Tuesday at its chambers at the municipal building. The council will have a closed session with the Board of Public Utilities at 6 p.m. The regular meeting will start at 7 p.m.

    Future Energy

    A regular meeting of the Future Energy Resources Committee is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at the municipal building.

    APP board

    The Arts in Public Places Board will meet at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at the municipal building.

    Birding

    Los Alamos Nature Center will present “Birding Hot Spots in New Mexico” Tuesday. The event will feature authors Judy Liddell and Barbara Hussey, who wrote a book about birding in the state. It will start at 7 p.m. and is free.

    School board

    Los Alamos School Board will hold a special meeting and work session at 5:30 p.m. Thursday. The meeting will be at the schools’ administration building.

  • Woman ordered to have treatment

    Los Alamos resident Marion Loope was sentenced to 268 days of community service in district court last week.
    The sentence was based on three prior criminal cases that included the charges of two counts of battery against a police officer, and assault upon a peace officer and battery upon a police officer.
    In a plea agreement Loope agreed to plead guilty to one count of battery upon a police officer in an incident that happened in August of last year. All the other charges were dismissed.
    In the incident that included the police battery charge, Loope, who was a patient at the Los Alamos Medical Center, charged at a staff nurse, lifted a metal tray over her head and then threw it at her, that according to court records.
    The tray did not hit the nurse.
    When police apprehended her and attempted to take her to jail, she then kicked a police officer in the stomach while being seated in the back of a patrol car.
    The altercation was reported to have started when Loope became dissatisfied with her treatment and the types of medications she was being given. According to the records, while incarcerated for another incident earlier this year, Loope vandalized the county jail facilities, causing $2,721.80 in damages.

  • Update focuses on partnerships

    POJOAQUE — Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted its quarterly Community Leaders meeting Thursday at Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino.
    LANL Director Charlie McMillan, Kim Davis Lebak, manager of the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Field Office and Christine Gelles, acting field manager for DOE’s Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office focused their presentations on the laboratory’s various partnerships.
    Davis Lebak praised LANL’s investment in the Community Commitment Plan.
    “LANL has gone well beyond what’s required, and we’re appreciative of the lab’s active engagement and community and strategic partnerships,” Davis Lebak said.
    McMillan touched upon partnerships with various scientific communities, the unions and the business community, but emphasized the importance of educational partnerships at this time.
    “The laboratory faces what I view as a real opportunity in our staffing. Over the next five years, we expect to lose a third of the laboratory workforce. They’ll either retire or leave for other reasons,” McMillan said.

  • Pet Talk: Symptoms of West Nile virus in horses

    The image of a cowboy riding off into the sunset on a palomino pony after a long hard day of rescuing a damsel in distress has reached the point of a cliché.
    A cowboy’s partner will forever be his trusty horse, and as long as his horse is healthy, he can continue riding off into the sunset. But what happens when a cowboy’s horse is infected by a deadly virus? Will there be a happy ending to that story?
    West Nile virus is defined as zoonotic, which means it can be transferred between animals and humans.
    The virus is mosquito-borne and spreads through intermediate hosts like blue jays and black birds. For this reason, the virus is more common in the summer or fall when birds are migrating from the north. Both humans and horses can be infected by West Nile; however, they are both considered “dead-end” hosts, meaning they cannot transmit the disease to others.
    West Nile virus first infected horses in 1999 with a case in New York. Since then, the United States has seen more cases of West Nile in horses, as well as humans.
    The year 2012 was the most deadly for humans with 286 deaths nationwide.

  • The night Emmanuel opened its doors to evil

    CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — When Angela Brown saw the Facebook post about a shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, her mind immediately leapt to her aunt. Whenever the doors to Emanuel were open to its flock, Ethel Lance was there.

    "This was her home," said her niece, standing in the shadow of its soaring spire, tears streaming down her face.

    So many people felt that way about "Mother" Emanuel.

    Founded in 1818 by a free black shoemaker, the church stood as a beacon in a port city through which many legions of Africans passed on their way to bondage. Torched by angry whites after one organizer led a failed slave revolt, Emanuel rose from the ashes to serve as a stop on the Underground Railroad, even as state leaders banned all black churches and forced the congregation itself underground.

    The current brick Gothic revival edifice was a mandatory stop for the likes of Booker T. Washington and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Still, Emanuel was not just a church for the black community.

    And so, when a young white man walked into the Bible study Wednesday evening and asked for the minister, no one thought twice. The Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Emanuel's senior pastor, invited the stranger to sit beside him.

  • Celebrate Juneteenth with a heavy heart

    Washington, D.C. – Congressman Ben Ray Luján of New Mexico’s Third District released the following statement recognizing the 150th anniversary of Juneteenth, the oldest known celebration commemorating the end of slavery in the United States.

    “On this day 150 years ago, Major General Gordon Granger landed at Galveston, Texas, bringing word that slavery had come to an end. While this day came two and half years after the Emancipation Proclamation, it stood as a momentous occasion that slavery was no more. Since that day, Juneteenth, as the day became known, has been a time of celebration and a time to reflect on the struggle for equality and freedom.
    As we celebrate Juneteenth, we do so with heavy hearts, mourning the tragic loss and senseless violence in Charleston, South Carolina. While this heinous crime has shaken our nation, we have seen a community shine a ray of light through this dark time by pulling together to support and comfort one another.

  • Dante and the way of love

    Dante, a serious rival to Shakespeare as the world’s greatest literary genius, was born in Florence, Italy, 750 years ago.
    Italy properly celebrated the birthday of its national poet (indeed he who virtually invented the modern Italian language) on May 4 and Pope Francis has encouraged Dante to be read as a “prophet of hope” and spiritual guide. And so he should be. Just as he has for three-quarters of a millennium.
    Dante’s “Divine Comedy,” written at the beginning of the 14th century during his permanent exile from Florence, is at once the crowning literary achievement of the Middle Ages, as well as the announcing angel of the Renaissance.
    Every true epic poem offers a totalizing vision of its age — its philosophy, science, theology, and history are all distilled to dramatize how humanity, the world and the divine struggle together.
    In Dante’s epic allegorical dream vision of a journey through the afterlife that devotes equal sections to Hell (“Inferno”), Purgatory (“Purgatorio”) and Heaven (“Paradiso”) one sees all that was thought and felt by Saints Augustine and Aquinas, but never so well expressed.
    Thus, Dante is the utmost medieval philosopher, theologian and poet.

  • News for Retirees June 21-27

    June 21-27, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Fish sandwich
    2 p.m.        Pinochle
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety training
    10 a.m.        Low vision/hearing group
    11:30 a.m.         Lunch: Oven fried chicken
    1:30 p.m.        Party Bridge
    1:30 p.m.        “Friends” meeting
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table tennis
    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.        LAVA quilters
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio plus exercise

  • Animal shelter 6-20-15

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html

    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.

    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.

    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.

    CATS

    Annie — A 9-year-old, spayed, female who just loves being petted! She has a very pretty black/gray, orange and white coat with short hair. Due to medical care needed by her owner, Annie is now at the shelter looking for her forever home. She can sometimes be a bit shy with shelter visitors, but she quickly warms up to you when you offer her some belly rubs!

  • Isotopes rally comes up short

    Even after a five-run seventh inning and three-run ninth, the Albuquerque Isotopes (30-39) late rally came up just short at Isotopes Park Friday night as the Tacoma Rainiers (34-35) took a 15-10 victory in game two.

    Six Isotopes turned in two-hit performances.

    Albuquerque struck first with a two-run homer from Matt McBride in the first, but Tacoma responded by scoring a combined 10 runs in the third through sixth innings. It wasn’t until a five-run seventh that the Isotopes mounted their comeback attempt. Back-to-back singles from Jose Rivera and Tim Wheeler got the inning rolling, and Drew Stubbs provided the big hit of the inning, a clutch two-RBI single. After the Rainiers scored a run in the eighth and four in the ninth, the 'Topes again struck for three in the home half of the ninth, but it was too little, too late as Tacoma shut the door for the victory.