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Today's News

  • Nearly 200,000 eligible for state health credits

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Nearly 192,000 New Mexicans will be eligible for subsidies to help pay for health insurance next year, according to a report an advocacy group released Wednesday.
    The report from Families USA, a Washington-based consumer health organization, said the federal tax credits that take effect Jan. 1 will make health insurance affordable for many working families and young people.
    “The tax credit subsidies are a game-changer,” Ron Pollack, executive director of Families USA, said in a conference call. “They will make health coverage affordable to huge numbers of families that would otherwise be priced out of the health coverage and care they need.”
    Barbara Webber, executive director of Health Action New Mexico, said New Mexico is one of the states with the most to gain from the new health care laws because of its high numbers of uninsured and underinsured residents.
    “Many of our families have gone for generations without health care coverage,” she said.

  • Update 04-11-13

    BPU meeting

    The regular monthly meeting of the Board of Public Utilities will meet at 5:30 p.m. April 17 in the DPU Conference Room, 170 Central Park Square.

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    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will hold budget hearings beginning at 7 p.m. April 15 in council chambers.

    Run For Her Life

    3rd Annual Run For Her Life Fight Breast Cancer 5K or 10K Run or Walk $25 (first 100 get a T-shirt) $30 after Wednesday and on race day) All donations and race proceeds will go to Hadassah for breast cancer research, education and treatment. Race begins at 9 a.m. Sunday at East Park.

    Poetry gatherings

    Mesa Public Library is pleased to host Poetry Gatherings, a place for people to share their love of poetry. The gatherings take place on the second Thursday of each month in the Upstairs Rotunda at Mesa Public Library from 6:30-8 p.m. 

  • Packed house at Bradbury

    Colonel Paul Tibbets, IV, the grand son of the Enola Gay’s pilot, shared personal remembrances of his grandfather’s military career at a lecture Wednesday night in front of a packed house at Bradbury Museum.

  • Board OKs athletic pass cost increase

    Next year, families and adults looking to purchase a season pass to watch middle school and high school sports are going to being paying a little more for the experience.
    The $50 adult pass will now be $75 and the $100 family passes (two adults two students) will be $125.
    Athletic Director Vicki Nelms made the presentation before the school board recently, explaining to the board the reasons behind the increase.
    “The money goes back to our budget, it helps us to take care of our athletic programs,” she told the board, adding that the department sells about 600 of the passes every year and that they make about $50,000 to $60,000 from the passes every year.
    It was also pointed out in the presentation that if individuals or families did not use the passes, and they attended every event through the purchase of a single ticket, it would cost an adult individual or a family $755 a season, instead of $75, $125 respectively.
    When asked by board member David Foster the reasons for the request, Nelms gave many.
    “When we had the budget cuts several years ago, we took a hit like everybody else did,” Nelms said.

  • Lab budget up 7 percent

     Los Alamos National Laboratory would see a 7 percent budget increase, while spending for Sandia National Laboratories would remain basically flat under the Obama Administration budget plan unveiled on Wednesday.
    The Department of Energy spending proposal requests $1.96 billion for Los Alamos and $1.8 billion for Sandia in fiscal 2014. In FY13, Los Alamos was operating on a $1.83 billion budget.
    Officials with the National Nuclear Security Administration say that given the tight budget times, they are also going back to reevaluate what might be done to more affordably upgrade the plutonium research facilities at Los Alamos.
    The administration last year proposed putting on hold any further work on a controversial $6 billion project known as the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Nuclear Facility.
    On Wednesday, the acting administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration, Neile Miller, said the lab is “clearly not affordable” and alternatives are being studied.
    The proposed budget also calls for a 5 percent cut for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, to $203 million.
    U.S. Martin Heinrich, D-N.M., said he was “encouraged that Los Alamos and Sandia labs are well-supported in the President’s budget proposal.”

  • Be There 04-11-13

    Today
    The Los Alamos Genealogical Association will meet at 7 p.m., at the Mesa Public Library. George Jennings will give a report on the recent Roots Tech 2013 Conference and the benefits of attending genealogical conferences. The public is invited.
    Friday
    The Posse Lodge is holding a fundraiser to kick off the 2013 Summer Concert Series. 7 p.m., featuring Los Alamos roots-rock band, DK & the Affordables. The Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series is set to begin May 17. Nineteen concerts are planned. Bring lawn chairs. For specific information on this and future concerts, visit gordonsummerconcerts.com.
    Saturday
    The Pajarito Astronomers will be holding a county-sponsored Dark Night at Spirio Soccer Field, Overlook Park, starting at 7:45 p.m. Weather permitting, the public is invited to wander among the telescopes and star gaze. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. Viewing will end before midnight. Call Steve Becker at 662-3252 for information.

  • Southwest Jemez Mountains Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Project meeting set for Friday

     

    The Southwest Jemez Mountains Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Project (SWJMCFLRP) will present a monitoring project update Friday, April 12 at Santa Fe Community College. A complete day of presentations is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. in the Lecture Hall auditorium, Room 216.

    In 2009 Congress established the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program to fund and encourage the collaborative, science-based ecosystem restoration of priority forest landscapes. In 2010 The Southwest Jemez Mountains Project was among the first selected to participate in the program.

    Collaboration was a key component in developing the monitoring plan and continues to be essential in implementing the various monitoring activities. The monitoring provides data which is used to determine whether the project is meeting its goals or to adjust treatments to achieve the best results. The objectives are to reduce risk of wildfire, enrich wildlife habitat and strengthen watershed condition.

    Participating members of the SWJMCFLRP will present results of monitoring that took place in 2012. Presentations will also illustrate how critical ecosystems are monitored and will include discussions about anthropological, social and economic factors.

     

  • Free help to upgrade commerical businesses

    Los Alamos Business Assistance Services, a program of Los Alamos Commerce & Development Corporation, is offering a seminar on the Upgraded Commercial Property Database from 1-2:30 p.m. on April 18 at the Small Business Center conference room, 190 Central Park Square.
    The seminar is free to chamber members or $25 for nonchamber members. If you are interested, please contact Katie Stavert at 661-4805 or katie@losalamos.org.
    LACDC has been a referral resource for commercial property for many years and has made many referrals leading to tenancies throughout the community. LACDC has developed an upgraded property inventory tool that includes the ability for property owners and brokers to log in to the web and change basic information and status for their properties. Attendees at the workshop will learn how to log in and work with the system.
    They will also learn about premium features that are available to promote their properties.
    With the improved inventory tool, LACDC is now able to accurately estimate occupancy rates for the area market for various types of commercial properties and in various submarket areas.

  • Three vie for Miss Indian World

    Channing Concho from Albuquerque, Kansas Begaye from Rio Rancho, and April Yazza from Zuni, will compete for the title of the 2013 Miss Indian World as part of the 30th Annual Gathering of Nations, at “The Pit” in Albuquerque, on April 25 and April 27.
    As part of the Gathering of Nations powwow, the Miss Indian World pageant is a competition of Native American women representing their different tribes and traditions. This year, 16 women will be competing for the yearlong title as a Cultural Goodwill Ambassador for all Native and Indigenous people.
    The Miss Indian World Pageant begins with the talent presentations April 25 at 7 p.m. at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino (at Isleta Pueblo) and continues through the weekend. The 2013 Miss Indian World will be crowned April 27 at 7:30 p.m. at the powwow.
    Tickets for the Miss Indian World Pageant on April 25 are $14 and will be available at the box office/door the night of the event.
    For more information call Marissa Livingston, from JKPR, at 505-797-6688 or at mlivingston@jameskorenchen.com. 

  • New approaches for reaching out to youth

    Lisa Bravo is the Director of Education and Training for the Children’s Success Foundation and Psychotherapist, that has been teaching and writing about the Nurtured Heart Approach for 10 years.
    The Nurtured Heart Approach, according to Bravo, was developed by her colleague, Howard Glasser, in the 1990s.
    “It began as a therapeutic approach for addressing the behavioral needs of children DX with ADD, ADHD and a host of other behaviorally based components,” Bravo said.
    On Monday, many LAPS staff, from the middle and high school, will spend a day of professional development learning the approach and the ease of implementation for the classroom.
    “I specialize in working with difficult teens in my practice and I can assure you that what they need the most from us is relationship and connection,” said Bravo. “This training will address the emotional needs of these young adults and how to foster emotional competency.”
    Bravo was excited to see the LAPS district focus on the upper-grade levels, when many communities tend to just focus on elementary-aged students.
    When the Los Alamos Juvenile Justice Advisory Board identified a gap that needed to be filled, they stepped in to help.