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Today's News

  • Event marks 70th anniversary of the test at Trinity Site

    Today marked the 70th anniversary of the test of “the gadget,” the payoff of the Manhattan Project during World War II.
    And nowhere was more intimately involved with it than Los Alamos.
    Much of the primary work on the world’s first nuclear weapon, the atomic bomb, which is widely credited as bringing an end to the war, was done at Los Alamos.
    On July 16, 1945, the first detonation of the atomic bomb was completed near Alamogordo at the Trinity Site.
    That test marked the beginning of the nuclear age and a new era of both energy generation and of warfare.
    Before dawn today, the Los Alamos Historical Society held a get-together at the Hans Bethe House on Bathtub Row to mark the occasion.
    Along with the gathering, the Historical Society sent out live tweets — excerpts from the journal of Jack Hubbard — during its “Dawn of a New Era” event. About 30 people attended the event, which started at 4:30 a.m.
    The event was the official kickoff of the 2015 ScienceFest, which continues through Sunday in and around Los Alamos.
    Hubbard, a meteorologist overseeing weather conditions of the test, had “a fascinating perspective” on the test, including the chosen date of July 16, which he thought was a poor choice based on the conditions in the area.

  • Chalk Walk pays tribute to local artist

    Sec Sandoval is one of Los Alamos’ most well-known artists. His watercolors of New Mexico landscapes can be viewed throughout the town and he has generously donated his works to many local organizations’ fundraisers and events.
    According to a 2009 story in Los Alamos Monitor, Sandoval studied art in Santa Fe and his education included oil painting. He was a technical illustrator for the U.S. Army Aggressor Center and his work has been shown in numerous locations in Los Alamos including the Fuller Lodge Art Center and Los Alamos National Bank.
    So it seems fitting to host an event that pays tribute to Sandoval’s contributions to the art world, as well as to the local community. As result, the Los Alamos Arts Council has sponsored, for the last four years, the Sec Sandoval Chalk Walk event. This year’s event will be from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday on Central Avenue in front of the Post Office.
    The event is part of MainStreet’s ScienceFest celebration. The Chalk Walk may pay homage to an artist, but participants do not need to be professional artists to enjoy decorating the pavement on Central Avenue. A little bit of imagination and creativity is all it takes.

  • Working past 65? Here’s what to know about Medicare

    If you plan to work past 65 and keep the health insurance you’ve had from your job, you’re likely to wonder what, if anything, you need to do about enrolling in Medicare.
    About one in six older Americans now remains in the workforce beyond what was once the traditional retirement age. And the number of older workers will only grow over time.
    One reason is that Social Security now requires you to be at least 66 to collect your full retirement benefits. Retiring earlier means a smaller Social Security check.
    Then, too, a number of 60-something workers continue to pursue their careers because they can’t afford to retire. And still others simply prefer to stay engaged and on the job.
    Whatever the reason for postponing your retirement, you still need to consider Medicare as you approach your 65th birthday and qualify for the health care coverage.
    First, you should visit with your company’s human resources manager to determine how your employer-provided insurance will fit with Medicare. That’s also true for anyone turning 65 and receiving health care through a working spouse’s group plan.
    Most workers will want to sign up for Medicare’s Part A, which usually has no monthly premium and covers hospital stays, skilled nursing, home health services and hospice care.

  • Fixing prison system

    New Mexico’s three-strikes law may be due for an update because, says Gov. Susana Martinez, the current law does not take enough violent criminals off the street.
    I’m all for protecting us from violent criminals, but I find our policies and attitudes toward prison — New Mexico’s and the nation’s — confusing and contradictory.
    What is prison for? Is it to punish? Is it, as the name “corrections” suggests, to reform? Is it just to get dangerous people off the streets?
    In recent years, states have outlawed the death penalty but increased the use of solitary confinement and enacted laws, like three strikes, that increase sentences.
    “Tough on crime” is still a fashionable attitude for some politicians, and it’s well known the U.S. maintains the highest incarceration rate in the world.
    The current population of New Mexico’s prisons is around 7,200, says the Corrections Department website. About 90 percent are male. Most, according to department public affairs officer Alex Tomlin, do not have a high school diploma or GED.
    Most, Tomlin said, are incarcerated for a second or subsequent offense, and most of those offenses were violent.

  • Tokyo Olympic venue shaping up as world's costliest stadium

    TOKYO (AP) — When the dust settles on the marquee venue for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, it could well be the most expensive sports stadium in the world.
    The latest cost estimate of 252 billion yen ($2 billion at current exchange rates) would push it beyond the current record-holder, the $1.6 billion MetLife stadium completed in 2010 for the New York Jets and Giants football teams.
    What is the money buying? The design of the stadium's ribbed roof on huge steel arches resembles a bicycle helmet. To support a natural grass field, the roof's southern end will be translucent to let in sunlight and underground will be soil ventilation and temperature control systems. Movable seats will bring the crowd closer for more intimate events, and this being Japan, the stadium will have earthquake-resistant features.
    While exchange rate fluctuations and inflation make comparisons tricky, it is safe to say that Japan's new National Stadium will likely to be the most expensive ever built, two sports economists told The Associated Press. The latest estimate was a 55 percent increase over an earlier one of 163 billion yen.

  • Hults, Krantz win flights

    Larry Hults won his flight on back-to-back days during recent Northern New Mexico Senior Men’s Golf Association (NNMSMGA) tournaments.
    On June 30, Hults shot a 77 gross score to win the third flight at the Santa Fe Country Club. His score was better than the first and second flight winners, as well.
    The next day, Hults shot an 81 gross at the Taos Country Club to win the third flight again.
    Ron Krantz also won his flight at Taos. He shot an 84 gross to win the second flight.
    Bob Quick was the first flight’s net winner with 70.
    Three other golfers from Los Alamos golfers had second-place finishes with their gross scores at Taos.
    Spike Jones (86), Don Pompeo (82) and Don Rokup (88) were the runners up in the second, third and fourth flights, respectively.
    Bob Villa also has a second-place finish at Santa Fe with an 88 gross score in the fourth flight.
    Jones shot a 61 net score at Santa Fe to finish second in the second flight.
    Fred Thomas, meanwhile, landed closest to the pin on the eighth hole.
    Los Alamos’ NNMSMGA tournament is scheduled for Sept. 9-10.
     

  • Adames homers in All-Star game

    Albuquerque Isotopes infielder Cristhian Adames promptly mashed the first pitch he saw in Wednesday night’s Triple-A All-Star Game over the left field wall for a solo home run at Werner Park in Papillion, Nebraska.
    The International League struck first with a run in the top of the first, and it wasn’t until Adames’ sixth-inning home run that the Pacific Coast League’s offense got on the board. A two-run blast by Reno’s Peter O’Brien in the eighth inning broke the 1-1 tie, and put the PCL on top.
    A three-run ninth inning, however, propelled the IL to a 4-3 win.
    The PCL had a chance to even things up in the bottom of the ninth with runners on first and second, but a strikeout ended the game with Adames on deck.
    Adames lined out in his only other at-bat on the evening. He entered the game as a defensive replacement in the top of sixth and homered in the home half of the inning. Adames was selected to participate in the event after teammate Matt McBride could not play due to an ankle injury.
    The 23-year-old prospect is currently batting .319 in 75 games with Albuquerque this season.

  • Candia, Medins and Williams have best predictions

    In spite of a slight, cooling rain, 45 runners and walkers enjoyed an evening jaunt Tuesday.
    The Pace Race featured one mile or three-mile courses on Barranca Mesa and in Bayo Canyon.
    For the three-mile route, the runners ran around Barranca Mesa Elementary, down the horse trail into Bayo Canyon to the point and then turned back on Gonzales Road to Barranca Elementary.
    Most of the three-mile runners beat their predictions in spite of the steep switchback required to get out of the canyon back onto Barranca Mesa.
    Nine runners on the long course, however, had predictions that were within 30 seconds of their actual time.
    Roxana Candia was the best predictor for the long course. She was off her prediction by just one second.
    Ted Williams was the second best predictor at four seconds off while John Ullman was only 10 seconds off his prediction.
    Other runners whose predictions were 30 seconds or less off included Katie Gattiker and Jesse Woodroffe at 16 seconds off, Heidi Bjorklund at 24 seconds off, Nikol Strother at 25 seconds off, Zach Medin at 26 seconds off and Richard Thompson III at 30 seconds off.

  • Today in history July 16
  • Rollover injures at least one

    Santa Fe County Sheriff deputies, Los Alamos fire, paramedics and police responded to a crash in the westbound lane of N.M. 502 around 12:45 p.m. Wednesday. Witnesses to the rollover reported at least one person being taken to the Los Alamos Medical Center for injuries.