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Today's News

  • LA picks up doubleheader sweep to improve to 3-0

    While there’s still a long way to go, the Los Alamos Hilltopper baseball team is off to a good start in keeping its firm grip at the top of District 2-4A.
    Los Alamos won one the hard way, then won one the easy way en route to a big district doubleheader sweep Saturday at Bomber Field. Los Alamos scratched out a run in its final at-bat in game one, then, to start off game two, had a big bottom of the first inning that let it play with some cushion.
    The Hilltoppers won the opening game 3-2, then cruised to a big 13-3 win in five innings in the nightcap.
    The wins put the Hilltoppers at 3-0 early on in 2-4A play. Their toughest test of the district season, however, could come this week when they play at Española Valley.
    But for now, Los Alamos will enjoy the wins.
    “It was pretty great,” said Hilltopper Jake Downs of the sweep. “The first game was really intense. We just had to battle through it, stay calm and do what we had to do.”
    Downs through six strong innings in game one. He gave up just three hits and one earned run before giving way to Connor Mang after pitching to one batter in the seventh — Mang would get credit for the win, setting down all three batters he faced.

  • ’Toppers, Demons split a pair

    Already sitting two games down in District 2-4A, the Los Alamos Hilltopper softball team knew something had to happen in a hurry Saturday.
    Fortunately for the Hilltoppers, something did.
    Los Alamos bounced back after dropping the first game of a big early doubleheader against the Santa Fe Demons at Overlook Park. The Demons won a big 8-2 victory in game one, but Los Alamos jumped out to a big lead early and held on through a rough fifth inning to win 11-6.
    Earning the split was a big deal for Los Alamos, which could’ve fallen behind three games to the early district leaders, a tough hole to climb out of even with nine games remaining on the schedule.
    “For us to have a chance in the district this year, we couldn’t get swept,” Hilltopper manager Roger Anaya said. “We were going to have to hit them hard and take the lead early (in game two).”
    Los Alamos did just that, scoring five runs in the bottom of the first.
    Emilee Jones had a 2-run home run in the inning and Krysta Salazar and Alyssa Mojica both came through with RBI hits off game one winning pitcher Alex Russell, who also threw game two for the Demons.

  • Sports Briefs 04-06-14

    Slowpitch softball season gets going April 26

    Registration is open for the upcoming slowpitch softball season.
    The slowpitch league is for men’s and women’s teams. Games are played during the week at Overlook Park in White Rock.
    The season starts April 26-27 with a tournament. The season runs through the end of July.
    Price for participation is $575 per team. Registration fee and additional paperwork is due by April 18.
    Additionally, a field work party is scheduled for April 12 at Overlook Park.
    For more information, send email to losalamossoftball@yahoo.com.

    Wall climbing event will be at YMCA Wednesday

    The Family YMCA of Los Alamos will host a spring break wall climbing event Wednesday. The climbing wall is at the YMCA’s main facility on Iris Street.
    The event will be from 9 a.m.-noon. Gear rental is $3 for anyone ages 3 and up.
    For more information, call the YMCA at 662-3100.
     

  • On Schedule 04-06-14

    Tuesday
    Baseball: Española Valley at Los Alamos, JV, 4 p.m.

    Softball: Española Valley at Los Alamos, JV, 4 p.m.

    Wednesday
    Baseball: Los Alamos at Española Valley, varsity, 4 p.m.

    Softball: Los Alamos at Española Valley, varsity, 4 p.m.

    Friday
    Baseball: Capital at Los Alamos, varsity, 3 p.m. and 5 p.m.

    Saturday

    Tennis: Los Alamos at Academy Invite, boys and girls varsity, TBA.

    Track and field: LAMS at Las Vegas Memorial Invite, boys and girls seventh and eighth grades, 8 a.m.

    Baseball: Los Alamos at Capital, varsity, 3 p.m. and 5 p.m.

    Softball: Los Alamos at Capital, varsity, 3 p.m. and 5 p.m.

  • Animal Shelter 04-06-14

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

  • News for Retirees 04-06-14

    April 6-12, 2014
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:30, 10 a.m. Tax prep
    8:45 a.m. Cardio
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Orange chicken over rice
    1 p.m. Assisted Living talk
    7 p.m. Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Cheese Pub burger
    Noon Chronic Kidney Disease talk
    2 p.m. MindBody massage
    7 p.m. Bridge
    7:30 p.m. Table tennis
    WEDNESDAY
    8:30, 10 a.m. Tax prep
    8:30 a.m. RSVP Quilters
    8:45 a.m. Cardio Plus Exercise
    10:30 a.m. AARP board meeting
    10:45 a.m. Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Tilapia
    1:15 p.m. Alzheimer’s support
    1:15 p.m. Socrates Café
    1:30 p.m. Daytime Duplicate Bridge
    THURSDAY
    8:30 a.m. Walk-in-the-woods
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    10 a.m. Antarctica talk
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Spaghetti with sauce
    1:30 p.m. Tap dancing
    2 p.m. Ballroom dancing
    6:30 p.m. Chess
    7 p.m. Bridge
    FRIDAY
    9:15 a.m. Line dancing

  • Free-for-all democracy wilts

    A durable democracy is built on multiple means of inquiry. Since it s founding, our nation has thrived on three such methods: science, trial by jury, and generalized talk.
    Each method is ages old, indispensable and honored in its own right. Yet their vital distinctions grow dim in the flak of today’s politicking.
    A diligent focus on each method reveals what it does, how it does it and their defining differences. A clear sense of each method illuminates democracy itself.
    The scientific method seeks truth that applies reliably under hosts of varied conditions. To do this, science defines words with great exactness and seeks to include every factor that affects an outcome. The task of science is to determine how and to what extent each of many factors affects the net result. Over long periods, missing knowledge is filled in, but is never finished.
    Robust methods of inquiry also require means of testing the validity of conclusions.
    Science checks validity by replicating an experiment’s results and by peer review of both the experiments and the results. Replicating experimental results requires knowing, measuring and controlling every factor that affects the outcome. Validity grows more certain as an outcome is replicated more times in more places.

  • Climate change, air quality and health

    The third National Climate Assessment report, due to be released this month, confirms both the role of human activities in causing climate change and the broad range of adverse health consequences that climate change brings.
    The report was produced by the federal government’s multi-agency United States Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), established by Presidential initiative in 1989.

 The effects of climate change on human health are of particular concern to the physician and scientist members of the American Thoracic Society.
    Our patients have cardiopulmonary disease and, therefore, are particularly susceptible to the air pollution emitted along with the carbon dioxide that contributes to climate change, which, itself, is injurious to respiratory health.
    According to the World Health Organization, the No. 1 environmental cause of death in the world is particulate matter air pollution. The WHO estimates that outdoor air pollution in both cities and rural areas caused 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2012.  

  • NNSA may take more action in ethics scandal

    The official DOE Inspector General report finally came out last week regarding the ethics scandal involving former Los Alamos National Laboratory deputy director Beth Sellers, who resigned March 7.
    The Los Alamos Monitor reported last month that Sellers was the subject of a draft IG report that revealed Sellers and husband William failed to notify lab officials of a potential conflict of interest. William Sellers eventually was awarded a sole-source contract and according to the report, he billed the lab for work that was never performed.
    In the final report, there is a response from acting NNSA administrator Bruce Held regarding the investigation.
    Held listed the corrective actions the lab had made in regard to the situation.
    Then he said, “findings identified in this report were considered in developing the
     lab’s FY13 Performance Evaluation Report and we are evaluating whether any additional management action may be necessary given the results of the Inspsectors’ review.
    “We take seriously our responsibility to ensure our federal and contractor staff adheres to the highest standards for ethical conduct and will ensure that lessons learned from this incident are shared across the nuclear security enterprise.”

  • Watchdog asks for WIPP inquiry

     A watchdog group is calling for an independent investigation in the fire and radiation release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.
    “We do know that the radiation release was never supposed to happen, and the federal government is unprepared to safely address the situation. In fact, the Environmental Protection Agency, charged with determining whether WIPP would leak in 10,000 years, said it would not,” said Joni Arends of Concerned Citizens of Nuclear Safety.
    “We understand that plans needed to be prepared in order to ensure the safety of the workers re-entering the mine, and we applaud the Department of Energy (DOE) for being thorough. On the other hand, for more than 15 years, CCNS has pressed DOE and the New Mexico Environment Department to enhance the emergency preparedness requirements in the hazardous waste permit in anticipation that such an event could happen. We were ridiculed by the agencies. And now we see that our concerns were more than justified.”
    Arends said an Accident Investigation Board was formed to investigate the vehicle fire, which was composed of DOE employees and consultants.