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Today's News

  • Water solutions at an affordable cost

    Second of a series
    One of the major issues in this town is water: do we have enough to keep this a green community, at an affordable cost?
    Contamination Threats and Mitigation
    Laboratory operations since the 1940s resulted in a wide array of chemical releases, often in effluent discharged from wastewater treatment facilities. Many millions of dollars have been spent to monitor and remediate the environmental contamination caused.
    Reactive contaminants, including plutonium and other radionuclides, tend to adhere to solid surfaces, so they usually have not moved very far in groundwater. In fact, wastewater effluent (now treated to strict standards to prevent further contamination) is used to irrigate vegetation holding soil in place to keep previously deposited surface contamination from spreading.
    Non-reactive contaminants, including hexavalent chromium, tritium, nitrate and explosives components perchlorate and RDX, have traveled farther in our groundwater, in some cases reaching portions of our aquifer. The presence of these contaminants above naturally occurring levels has not been detected in our water supply wells, but unless carefully monitored and properly remediated, they could threaten our water supply.

  • Rio Arriba County sheriff arrested

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A northern New Mexico sheriff who has had brushes with scandal throughout his career was arrested Friday on charges alleging he assaulted a man with a gun following a high-speed chase, according to authorities and court records.
    FBI spokesman Frank Fisher confirmed Rio Arriba County Sheriff Thomas Rodella and his son, Thomas, Jr., were arrested in their Espanola home but he wouldn’t say why.
    Federal court documents filed Tuesday, however, say both men were indicted on charges of conspiracy and falsifying records related to the March incident.The men, the indictment said, engaged “in a high-speed pursuit and unreasonable seizure” of a motorist identified only as M.T.
    The sheriff was not in uniform when he jumped out of his Jeep SUV with a silver revolver in hand, court papers said.
    “Rodella assaulted M.T. with a silver revolver while M.T. continually begged not to be shot,” the indictment said.
    U.S. Attorney Damon Martinez and FBI Special Agent in Charge Carol Lee planned a news conference Friday morning.
    A lawyer for Rodella didn’t immediately return a phone message and email from The Associated Press.

  • Not back to school breakfast set for Thursday

    The annual Not back to school breakfast was held Thursday. The breakfast was started by retiree Bill Hudson 40 years ago. He called a few retirees ,and they called some others, and the rest is history. Judy Crocker was the organizers and the retirees enjoyed a catered breakfast at Kelly Hall at Trinity on the Hill. Pictured here are Inez Ross and Bill Hudson.

  • Smith's donates to Nature Center

    Smith’s Marketplace donated $5,000 toward the new nature center to fund exhibits. Store Director Erik Boehm presented a check to Pajarito Environmental Education Center Executive Director Katie Watson Friday morning. So far, just over $1 million has been raised.

  • MOWW meeting scheduled

    Dr. Amanda M. Barry from Los Alamos National Laboratory will be the guest speaker at the August meeting of the Major General Franklin E. Miles Chapter 229 of The Military Order of the World Wars.
    The meeting will be Tuesday at the Los Alamos Research Park in the main meeting room.
    The topic of Dr. Barry’s talk will be “Transforming Microalgae for Biofuel Production.” The meeting will begin with a social period at 6 p.m. followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m. Dr. Barry’s talk will begin at about 7:15 p.m.
    The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to interested citizens for the dinner and program with RSVP, or the program only at no cost. The Hot Rocks Java Cafe staff is catering the buffet dinner with the entrée expected to be steak fajitas, condiments and dessert. Cost of the dinner is $25 per person. Note that a dinner reservation made is a commitment to the chapter to pay for the reserved dinner(s). RSVP for the dinner is needed by Sunday. Call Lt. Col. Norman G. Wilson, USAF Retired, Chapter Senior Vice Commander and Past Chapter Commander, 662-9544 (email NrmWil5@cs.com), or Adjutant Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750 (email depinyan@cybermesa.com).
    Monitor Staff Report
     

  • Briefs 08-15-14

    Albuquerque school chief resigns amid probe

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The superintendent of New Mexico’s largest school district has resigned following a probe into an undisclosed personnel issue.
    In a joint statement Friday, the Albuquerque Public Schools Board and Winston Brooks said both sides agreed his resignation was “the best option” for both parties.
    Earlier this week, board members met for five hours in a closed session. Board members said the meeting involved a personnel issue with Brooks, but declined to say more.
    Hispanic community leader Ralph Arellanes applauded the announcement, saying the Hispano Round Table of New Mexico and the League of United Latin American Citizens have never had so many complaints about abuse of power against women and minorities by a superintendent as it had against Brooks.
    Hired in July 2008, Brooks earns an annual salary of around $258,000.

    Official clears contested contributions to King

  • Concert to be held at Del Norte Credit Union

    Friday’s Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series show will be at Del Norte Credit Union, 1000 Trinity Dr. “We’re calling the evening ‘Co-op Night’ and we thank DNCU, Zia Credit Union, LA Schools CU, LA Food Co-op and the Española Community Market for their support of the Series and support of our town,” Coordinator Russ Gordon said.
    Friday’s concert is free of charge thanks to the sponsors in the community and starts at 7 p.m. The public is asked to bring their own chairs.
    The music will be by Guy Forsyth and his new band, the Hot Nut Riveters from Austin, Texas. Forsyth was the original lead singer of the Asylum Street Spankers and he called them “Texas’ original Recession Era band.”
    “That band played two of the most bizarre, fun and downright naughty concerts this town has ever seen,” Gordon said. “When I found out that Guy Forsyth was leading his own roots-rock and blues band about five years ago we booked that outstanding group three different times and they we’re tremendous musicians and great entertainers.”

  • Update 08-15-14

    GOP meeting

    The Los Alamos Federated Republican Women will hold a meeting at noon Aug. 19 at the Ridgepark Clubhouse, 505 Oppenheimer Dr. All registered Republican Woman are invited to attend.

    Blood drive

    A blood drive will be held Aug. 21 and Aug. 22 at the First Baptist Church on Diamond Drive. Hours will be 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Aug. 21 and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 22. To sign up, call United Blood Services at 877-UBS-HERO or 505 246-1457.

    Lunch with a Leader

    The League of Women Voters Lunch with a Leader will feature Ben Carlson, the publisher of the Los Alamos Monitor, as speaker at 11:45 a.m. Aug. 19 at the Mesa Public Library. Contact Karyl Ann Armbruster at 661-6605 or kaskacayman@gmail.com  for the menu choices if you would like to order a lunch from the Co-op ($10) by Sunday. You do not have to order lunch to attend this community event.

    Concerts

    • Gordon’s Summer Concert Series. Guy Forsyth’s Hot Nut Riveters. 7-10 p.m. at Del Norte Credit Union.
    • Tuesdays at the Pond Series. 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond. Two acts performing: Bronach Celtic Blues Band followed by Belisama Dance group. on Aug. 19. The wrong date was reported Tuesday. 

  • Fire damages Piñon playground

    It took five days for workers to install the new slide at the Piñon Elementary School.
    It took less than five minutes, though, for all that work to go up in flames.
    Superintendent Gene Schmidt announced the school district has posted a $1,000 reward for information leading to the identification of the person(s) responsible for the vandalism to the Piñon playground.
    Police and the fire department responded to a call of a fire on the Piñon playground.
    At approximately 1:28 a.m. Thursday, which was also the first day of school, a report from a resident was called in to Fire Station 3. Police officers Corporal Sheldon Simpson, Detective Joey Robinson, and firefighters from Engine 10 responded and extinguished the fire within minutes.
    No structures were damaged; however, the recently installed “big toy” slide on the upper playground was badly damaged. The slide, made of plastic, melted and excessive burn marks could be seen.
    Principal Jill Gonzales, who arrived at the scene at around 2:30 a.m. said when she arrived the arson investigator already was there.
    “The top priority is to get this replaced,” Gonzales said.
    Schmidt said, “It saddens me this senseless, mean-spirited act disrupted the first day for students.”

  • Central Avenue businesses take hit during construction

    Construction for the Central Avenue Project has hit local businesses hard, and the losses are mounting. CB Fox’s sales are down 10 percent, the Manhattan Project is down 30 percent and Ruby K’s foot traffic has dropped 25 percent in July and 35 percent to date in August. Now owners are assessing plans for getting through the winter.
    “I would say that the locals have been outstanding, and have supported us in droves,” said CB Fox General Manager Andy Fox.
    “But the problem is that this is July and August, and when we rely very heavily on tourism. So only a small fraction of our regular tourist shoppers have been able to find us and get into our store. So we are hurting from lack of tourist traffic in our most important tourist season, July and August.”
    Fox has had to reduce hours for part time employees and cut back on purchasing. He called the 10 percent drop “a ton of money. We won’t recover from that this year.”
    Ruby Alexander, owner of Ruby K’s, has also had to reduce employee hours.
    “It’s hurt our staff, trying to make house payments and pay bills, but I’ve had to cut hours because I was overstaffed for the number of people coming in the door,” Alexander said.