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Today's News

  • PAC 8 schedule 4-23-15 to 5-30-15

    THIS WEEK
    ON PAC 8

    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC 8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, April 24, 2015
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program
    11:00 AM County Budget Replay 4-21-15
    02:00 PM MPL Authors Speak Series
    03:00 PM Gallery Discussion for Edith Warner & Tiano– Bridge Between Two Worlds
    04:00 PM Uprising
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM United in Christ
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – President Truman
    08:30 PM The Garage
    09:00 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:30 PM Community Central
    10:00 PM Business Breakfast- Los Alamos’ Economic Outlook
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, April 25, 2015
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, April 26, 2015
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

    Monday, April 27, 2015
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! LIVE
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program
    11:00 AM Elizabeth Clare Prophet

  • Restaurant inspections 4-23-15

    White Rock
    Bandelier Grill, 11 Sherwood Blvd.
    Date Inspected: March 26
    Violations: Five moderate-risk violations. Cutting board needs to be replaced. Hood/vents need to be cleaned. Can opener, slicer, dicer has food product. Ice scoop not in appropriate storage receptacle. Need thermometer in fridge and freezer. Five low-risk violations. Walls need to be cleaned. Employees need hair restraints. Boxes on floor must be 6 inches off the floor. Lights need to be cleaned. Inadequate lighting.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.
    Española
    Carniceria Ortega, 811 C. North Riverside Dr.
    Date Inspected: March 5
    Violations: Two moderate-risk violations. Particle accumulation on non-food contact surfaces including storage door handles, storage counter, storage racks, along corners of wall/ floor. Batch code not identified on final packaged products. Two low-risk violations. Food on the floor in freezer. Missing ceiling tiles above vent hood.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Sonic Drive-In, 809 S. Riverside Dr.
    Date Inspected: March 6
    Violations: None
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Wendy’s, 1610 N. Riverside Dr.
    Date Inspected: March 17

  • Restaurant inspections 4-23-15

    White Rock
    Bandelier Grill, 11 Sherwood Blvd.
    Date Inspected: March 26
    Violations: Five moderate-risk violations. Cutting board needs to be replaced. Hood/vents need to be cleaned. Can opener, slicer, dicer has food product. Ice scoop not in appropriate storage receptacle. Need thermometer in fridge and freezer. Five low-risk violations. Walls need to be cleaned. Employees need hair restraints. Boxes on floor must be 6 inches off the floor. Lights need to be cleaned. Inadequate lighting.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.
    Española
    Carniceria Ortega, 811 C. North Riverside Dr.
    Date Inspected: March 5
    Violations: Two moderate-risk violations. Particle accumulation on non-food contact surfaces including storage door handles, storage counter, storage racks, along corners of wall/ floor. Batch code not identified on final packaged products. Two low-risk violations. Food on the floor in freezer. Missing ceiling tiles above vent hood.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Sonic Drive-In, 809 S. Riverside Dr.
    Date Inspected: March 6
    Violations: None
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Wendy’s, 1610 N. Riverside Dr.
    Date Inspected: March 17

  • Be There calendar 4-23-15

    Today
    The New Mexico Department of Health Alcohol Epidemiologist Dr. Laura Tomedi will speak at a meeting regarding DWI awareness. 8:30 a.m. in council chambers of the Municipal Building. Tomedi will be speaking on “Alcohol: Public Health and Policy” and the presentation will focus on how alcohol effects many facets of public health with particular emphasis on the statistics in Los Alamos County and what policies are working to reduce the excessive use of alcohol. For more information, contact Linda Matteson, Los Alamos County DWI coordinator at 662-8241 or linda.matteson@lacnm.us.

    Open House with Environmental Scientists. Noon-1 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum. Ask laboratory biologists and anthropologists about natural resource questions.

    The Republican Party of Los Alamos will hold its biennial organizing convention. 7 p.m. at UNM-LA Lecture Hall, room 230. Note that this is a different room within UNM-LA than the party has met in previously. Doors will be open by 6:30 p.m. for registration. Attendees will choose ward chairs, members of the local central committee (the party’s governing body), party officers and local delegates to the state party central committee. All registered Republicans are welcome and encouraged to attend.  For more information, contact Robert Gibson, 662-3159.

  • LAHS culinary classes help to feed seniors

    The Los Alamos High School Culinary Arts 2 class took their business skills on the road as they traveled to the Betty Ehart Senior Center last month, under the direction of teacher Louise Majorey.  
    The high school students had the opportunity to work with Chef Michael Mason and Chef Fred Ortiz, as they prepare the BESC daily lunch and meals for their Home Delivered Meals food program.
    The Home Delivered Meals program served almost 15,000 meals last year to the frail and financially challenged seniors in our community.
    The nutritionally sound dishes are made with love every day, in the kitchen at the BESC and recently had some additional helpers to assist.
    “I thought the senior center was wonderful,” said LAHS junior Jasmin Suazo. “I really enjoyed going and helping.”
    Suazo was surprised by the number of seniors that the program feeds and enjoyed just being able to help out. Students packaged cobbler, sealed fruit cups and helped to ready meals for the daily delivering of lunch and dinner to many in the community.
    The LARSO chefs arrive early to begin not only preparations for home delivery, but also to prepare the congregate meal. This meal is also made daily and offers local seniors an opportunity to share a meal in the heart of the center for fun and fellowship.

  • Hubba Bubba Award
  • Middle school students present New Mexico culture

    The Los Alamos Middle School Hawks soared to new heights recently, as 127 students took part in, Discover New Mexico! 
    The New Mexico Culture Day took place during half of the day, with students rotating through four out of five presentations.
    The presentations included weaving, pottery, history, artifacts and tinwork with participation from Irvin Trujillo on Spanish Colonial Art, Marcia Padilla, Mina Padilla and Jordan Havier of the Santa Clara Pueblo with pottery and more.
    “New Mexico history is a seventh grade state standard and New Mexico has a rich tri-cultural history filled with traditions,” said LAMS teacher, Eleanor James-Springfield.  “Through this in-school field trip format, students experienced hands-on activities with some of these cultural traditions.”
    The students learned history and had some hands-on, educational opportunities designing and creating their own pieces of culture throughout the event.
    “I thought Discover New Mexico activities were fun and full of learning experiences,” seventh grader, Kaya Krantz said.
    The classes will also follow up with activities where students examine their own culture and individual family traditions.

  • Why strengthening the Freedom of Information Act is so important

    President Barack Obama has routinely promised greater transparency within the federal government. Now, Congress is making strides towards achieving this critical goal.
    The House of Representatives and Senate are currently considering nearly identical bills to strengthen the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), which provides the general public, including journalists, with access to federal government records.
    This legislation has received broad support across media organizations, including the Sunshine in Government Initiative, a coalition of which the Newspaper Association of America is a member. And here’s why:
    • Openness instead of secrecy would be the “default” key within the government.  
    The legislation would require agencies to release documents under a “presumption of openness,” reaffirming the principle that information should never be kept confidential to protect government interests at the expense of the public.
    Agencies would need to prove specific harm that could result from disclosures before withholding documents. While this policy has been in place since 2009, the legislation would ensure future administrations honor this objective for openness.
    • The process of obtaining FOIA records would be much more efficient.

  • Water bills dried up in this legislative session

    Lawmakers considered some substantive water bills this year.
    As usual, successes were small.
    One of the most watched bills was House Bill 38, the Forest and Watershed Restoration Act.
    Lawmakers and interest groups — agricultural, environmental, and civic — have said the state’s current efforts to remediate wildfire devastation to forests and watersheds are inadequate, considering the extent of damage and potential for even more harm to critical water sources.
    The bill created an advisory board, attached to the Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department, and a fund. The board could adopt guidelines and best-management practices for projects, coordinate activities with various agencies and nonprofits and evaluate and prioritize projects for funding.
    The department would have the last word.
    The state Department of Agriculture said the bill’s $2.25 million in funding would step up the pace and reach of restoration work, and the State Land Office said some of the projects would make state trust lands more productive and reduce fire damage.
    The bill had bipartisan sponsorship (Rep. Paul Bandy, R-Aztec, and Sen. Peter Wirth, D-Santa Fe), passed both chambers unanimously, and miraculously found funding. But EMNRD said HB 38 would duplicate work done by its forestry division.

  • State briefs 4-23-15

    New WIPP boss headed to contaminated site

    CARLSBAD (AP) — The man appointed to lead the company that oversees the federal government’s troubled nuclear waste repository in southern New Mexico previously ran a facility in Idaho where a radiation release contaminated workers in 2011.
    Philip Breidenbach was named president and project manager of the Nuclear Waste Partnership last week. The company manages the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, which has been closed since last year due to a radiation release.
    The Albuquerque Journal reports Breidenbach used to run a plutonium facility at Idaho National Laboratory, where a radiation accident contaminated 16 workers.
    The incident was blamed on a lack of safety precautions and worker training, much like the WIPP mishap.
    Despite the criticisms of watchdogs, Nuclear Waste Partnership says Breidenbach has a track record of turning around a troubled operation.

    Rodella must remain in prison while appealing

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A former Rio Arriba County Sheriff will remain in federal prison in Texas while awaiting his appeal charges of violating a person’s civil rights while using a handgun.