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Today's News

  • Hoffman, Zurek are honored by LANL

    Darleane Hoffman and Wojciech Zurek are 2014 Los Alamos Medal recipients, the highest honor bestowed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANL’s press office announced Thursday.
    “Darleane Hoffman’s distinguished career and her contributions to nuclear science and actinide chemistry make her a trailblazer and role model for all women in science, while Wojciech Zurek’s world-renowned work in quantum theory has inspired Nobel Laureates and provided a bridge between classical and quantum mechanics,” said LANL Director Charlie McMillan. “Los Alamos does not necessarily award a medal each year, preferring instead to wait to bestow the honor only upon a prestigious subset of nominees who have demonstrated the highest levels of scientific achievement. This year’s recipients are well worth the wait.”
    The Los Alamos Medal was established in 2001 to honor those who have contributed to the laboratory at the highest level. The Los Alamos Medal recognizes individuals who have made a contribution that changed the course of science, a major enhancement of LANL’s ability to accomplish its mission, a significant impact on sustainability and/or established a major direction for the lab and the nation.

  • Vehicle request denied again

    Last week, the Los Alamos County Council rejected Sheriff Marco Lucero’s request for $26,000 for a dedicated vehicle for his department.
    Councilor James Chrobocinski made a motion to approve Lucero’s request as soon as discussion on the sheriff’s department budget opened, even before councilors had a chance to direct questions to staff regarding the budget.
    After questions and discussion, the motion failed by a 5-2vote.
    Lucero made his request at Monday’s hearings. It was the fifth year in a row the county’s second-term sheriff has made a vehicle request.
    “During the last five years I’ve logged over 26,000 miles on my personally owned vehicles to travel throughout the state and Colorado on your behalf and as your sheriff to do my job as required and keep the interest of the sheriff’s in place,” Lucero said.
    In response to questioning, Lucero suggested that with an estimated 10-year life for a vehicle, the purchase price would be comparable to the $13,000 in mileage reimbursements he has received the last five years.

  • Union, SOC agree to an extension

    Los Alamos National Laboratory announced Friday the two sides of a labor dispute that could’ve impacted the lab’s security have come to a temporary agreement.
    Securing Our Country-Los Alamos (SOC-LA) and the International Guards Union of America Local 69 have reached a 60-day contract extension.
    The two sides had come to a negotiating impasse recently on a new contract and a potential work stoppage had been on the table between the two sides.
    SOC-LA is contracted to LANL to provide security forces and services. SOC-LA, which operates under parent company SOC-LLC, is reportedly in the final option year of its five-year service agreement.
    LANL spokesperson Kevin Roark said union security personnel at LANL will continue to work as normal during the extension period.
    When LANL announced potential trouble between SOC and the union — neither SOC nor the local chapter of the union returned messages by the Los Alamos Monitor seeking comment — it also announced that it and SOC were putting together a contingency force to try to ensure no security issues would occur during a work stoppage, if that situation arose.
    Roark said the contingency plan “will not be implemented at this time.”
    The work stoppage prior to the extension was scheduled to begin today.

  • LA School Board votes for budget

    The Los Alamos School Board passed its budget for 2015-16 Thursday night, but not after a lot of soul searching from administrators and board members, since this $38.6 million budget includes a list of $2.7 million in expenditures and business increases projected to be paid for through the district’s “lease funds.”
    Those are funding the district receives from its portfolio of properties it leases to businesses, including the Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Most of the properties are former school sites. At present, the lease fund contains a reserve of about $7 million, an amount that according to LAPS’ chief operations officer was built up over a period of 10 years.
    The $38.7 million budget was passed 4-1, with board members Bill Hargraves, Jenny McCumber, Andrea Cunningham and Board Vice President Matt Williams voting for the budget.
    President Jim Hall was the lone dissenter, stating that he did not believe in taking the $2.7 million in lease funds to balance the budget and urged his fellow board members to vote for asking the administration to take one more week to find ways to help the board reduce the $2.7 million deficit.

  • Lewis & Todd 4-26-15
  • Word on the Street 4-26-15

    Teen Pulse staff writer Wilbur Wang asked students, “If you could be an exchange student to another country, which one would you choose?”

  • Exchange student from Serbia expands her horizons in U.S.

    Every year, Los Alamos High School hosts a group of foreign exchange students who apply through various global programs such as the Rotary’s Youth Exchange, to explore American culture in depth.
    Srna Petrovic, an 18-year-old senior from Serbia, is one such student who views her exchange experience as an opportunity to “see how other people live in a different part of the world.” To her, being an exchange student means to “go somewhere where you have never been before and to stay with someone that you have never met before.”
    Petrovic applied for the exchange program because she “loved traveling and exploring new cities.” Originally, Petrovic wanted to be located near the ocean, but despite the fact that she was placed in Los Alamos, the opposite of a seaport town, she said she has come to love the mountains and sunsets.
    For Petrovic, the language barrier was nonexistent. Her proficiency in English, allowed her to observe the full swing of the American school system, as well as many different United States’ holidays, her favorite being Thanksgiving.
    Petrovic notes that in Serbia, she has “15 subjects each year, which [she] cannot choose.” There are also no clubs or extracurriculars available.

  • News for retirees 4-26-15 to 5-1-15

    April 26-May 2, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Tater tot casserole
    Noon        Grief support
    12:15 p.m.        Smart Driver class
    2 p.m.        Pinochle
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Chicken tacos
    1 p.m.         MindBody massage
    1:30 p.m.         “Friends” meeting
    1:30 p.m.        Party bridge
    6 p.m.        Mahjong
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table tennis

  • Great expectations for ourselves and our children

    “If your children are no better than you are, you have fathered them in vain, indeed you have lived in vain,” according to Alexander Solzhenitsyn in “Cancer Ward.”
    Actually, I am not satisfied merely if my children are better than I am, for I have set that bar rather low. At the very least, my goal is that my children will be above average, better than their peers.
    I am not speaking of academic ability. We are drowning in evidence of academic strengths and weaknesses, based on required standardized testing.
    Instead, I am thinking of positive youth development, sometimes referred to as character development.
    Do people view me as a man of integrity? Do people view my children as people of integrity? Are they contributing members of society, in their families, at the workplace, and in their churches?
    Psychology is not as accurate when it comes to measuring positive youth development. It is a more subjective domain — the evidence is easier to misinterpret and exaggerate.
    A large amount of research in psychology is based on survey data, in which people describe themselves.

  • Credit score updates people should know

    Credit scoring has evolved over the last three decades and this fall, FICO made one more important change.
    Borrowers who have struggled with medical debt and those with a limited credit history might see better FICO numbers in the future. Even if these situations don’t apply to you, understanding how credit scoring is changing can help you better manage your credit over time.
    FICO Score 9, rolled out last fall, is described as a more “nuanced” version of the original FICO Score that the leading credit scoring company introduced in 1989.
    It is offered by three major credit bureaus — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. It now bypasses collection agency accounts and weighs medical debt differently than non-medical debt on a person’s credit record.
    Borrowers with a median score of 711 whose only negative credit data comes from medical collections will see their credit score go up 25 points under the new system.
    As for consumers with limited credit histories — what the industry calls “thin files” — FICO says the new system will better determine the ability of someone in that situation to repay a debt.