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Today's News

  • Several German class students receive medals of achievement

    Los Alamos High School students Katie Delgado, Wilbur Wang and Devon McClesky, along with 11 others received medals from the American Association of German Teachers for scoring in the 91st to 99th percentile, when compared to German students on a nationwide scale.
    “Wunderbar!” Dr. Debbie Belew-Nyquist said. “We have outstanding students who also have an outstanding teacher in Ms. Boshier. She works hard to enthusiastically design lessons and activities that brings out the best in them through learning German in her classroom.”
    LAHS sophomore Katie Delgado scored in the 99th percentile on the level 2 exam and was the top nominee for their Study Trip Award. Her efforts secured the top spot and Delgado was gifted a three-week stay in Germany to attend school. She will stay with a host family, where she will also visit Berlin.
    Wilbur Wang, also a sophomore, scored a 99 percent on the level 3 exam, receiving a gold medal and their 2015 Austrian Book Award.
    Devon McClesky, a junior scored in the 97th percentile for the level two exam, also receiving a medal and the 2015 Austrian Book Award.
    Additional gold medal recipients include Rose Click, Emily Brown, George Margevicius, Andreas Runde, Alexander Ionkov, Kayla Parker, Louise Belian, Tabitha Welch, Rachel Wallstrom, Jennifer Wang and Andrew Makela.

  • Time to invest in families, communities

    Much has been made of America’s crumbling infrastructure. Rusting bridges and crumbling highways are only a part of our neglect.
    A much bigger part, and one that many of us don’t see is the neglect of inner-city communities, distressed schools and long forgotten playgrounds.
    The recent protests in Baltimore, much like Albuquerque’s protests last year, may have been triggered by unjust police violence, but are much more deeply rooted in decades of neglecting our families and communities, especially communities of color.
    When Governor Susana Martinez was asked recently about the possibility of a special session to approve the financing of infrastructure projects, she said, “if it is, it’s got to benefit the private sector.” She made no mention of the needs of our families or communities, only the “private sector.” That was the reason that the bill didn’t pass in the first place!
    Lawmakers invested their capital outlay for projects like senior centers, tribal needs and community colleges, much of what she stripped from the bill.
    The tax committees met nearly every day of the legislative session and every day they heard bills that would divert even more of our public tax dollars to the “private sector.”

  • County needs real plan

    The Comprehensive Plan was completed in 1987. By now, even the updates are outdated.
    An effort to rewrite the whole plan in the early 2000s produced only a Vision Statement and Policy Plan, adopted in 2005, that is now cited by the Community and Economic Development Department (CEDD) as “the Comprehensive Plan.”
    This is 19 pages of aspirational platitudes that are so vague and ambiguous that they are useless to anyone attempting to satisfy the requirements of applications for permits and rezoning, or anyone attempting to defend their neighborhood against one of these applications.
    You’d think at least the county attorney would notice a problem here (not to mention the obsolescence of the Development Code — another story for another day).
    My neighborhood experienced the consequences of this ad hoc plan first-hand last year when University of New Mexico-Los Alamos applied to redevelop the apartments on 9th Street. The CEDD worked with UNM-LA to develop a proposal to the council for joint funding of the project, then it coordinated with UNM-LA’s Denver developer to plan for a non-conforming oversize structure and then it attempted to fast-track a rezoning through the Planning and Zoning Commission (P&Z) using the policy plan as the justification.

  • Jaguar habitat getting sued

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The setting aside of hundreds of square miles in New Mexico as critical habitat for the endangered jaguar was an “unlawful, arbitrary and capricious” action by federal authorities and needs to be overturned, a new lawsuit said.
    In court papers filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Albuquerque, Farm and Livestock Bureau, the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association and New Mexico Federal Lands Council said the decision by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to set aside land for the cat places unnecessary regulations on landowners.
    In addition, the designation of the critical habitat violates the Endangered Species Act because the area “was not occupied when the jaguar was listed as an endangered species,” the lawsuit said.
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service spokeswoman Lesli Gray said the agency couldn’t comment on pending litigation.
    The lawsuit seeks attorneys’ fees and for a federal judge to overturn the critical habitat designation.
    In March 2014, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service set aside nearly 1,200 square miles along the U.S.-Mexico border as habitat essential for the conservation of the jaguar. Federal officials acknowledged last year when they made the designation that no female jaguars or breeding had been documented in the U.S. in more than 50 years.

  • On The Docket 5-21-15

    May 13

    Hongwu Xu was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of failing to yield or stop at a sign. Defendant was fined $50 and must also pay $65 in court costs.

    Thomas J. Grab pled guilty at the time of traffic stop to speeding six to 10 miles per hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $50 and must also pay $65 in court costs.

    May 14

    Stanley E. Hayes pled no contest in the Los Alamos Municipal Court to failing to display a current, valid registration plate. Defendant was fined $25 and must also pay $65 in court costs.

    Ron J. Salazar pled guilty at the time of traffic stop to speeding six to 10 miles per hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $50 and must also pay $65 in court costs.

    James Mercer-Smith pled guilty at the time of traffic stop to speeding six to 10 miles per hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $50 and must also pay $65 in court costs.

    Monique Ruiz pled no contest in the Los Alamos Municipal Court to driving with a suspended or revoked license. Defendant was fined $100 and must also pay $65 in court costs.

    Michael Soto was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of failing to obey a traffic signal. Defendant was given community service and must also pay $65 in court costs.

    May 18

  • Snake Safety Tips

    More Tips from Mike Wyant

    • Walk in areas where the ground is clear so you can see where you walk with your feet or reach with your hands
    • Use a walking stick to rustle shrubs alongside the trail to alert snakes of your presence.
    • Wear protective clothing such as long pants and hiking boots. Pit vipers (crotalidae) have heat sensors to detect the body heat of other animals and are especially sensitive to bare skin.
    • Wear gloves when moving rocks and brush.
    •Watch where you step. Never put your feet or hands into places you cannot see.

    If you do get bit:

  • Update 5-21-15

    Plant Sale

    There will be a Second Chance Plant Sale Saturday at 811 Tiffany Court on North Mesa. The sale, which is hosted by the Los Alamos Garden Club, will be from 8 a.m.-noon.
    Proceeds will go to benefit Los Alamos High School Scholarships.

    Artists Market

    There will be an Artist Market Saturday at the visitor center in White Rock. The market will run from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. For more information, call 661-4836.

    Science Museum

    The Bradbury Science Museum will have a special presentation Friday, “Exploring the Solar System.” The event will be part of the Los Alamos Creative District’s Fourth Fridays initiative. The presentation will be from 4-6 p.m. at the museum.

    Community Winds

    The Los Alamos Community Winds will present a Memorial Day Concert. 2 p.m. Monday on the Fuller Lodge lawn.

    Co-Op Market

    The Los Alamos Cooperative Market will have its farmers market Saturday on Entrada Road. The market will run from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

    Bandelier

    Bandelier National Monument will have a Night Sky Program Saturday at the Juniper Campground Amphitheater. It will take place at 8 p.m., weather permitting.

    Concert Series

  • Paul: GOP is willing to change

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul reaches out in his most direct way yet to African-Americans in a new book that highlights his libertarian policies on government surveillance, the economy and criminal justice reform.
    “My party has let the bond it once enjoyed with minorities fray to the point that it is near beyond repair,” the Kentucky senator writes in “Taking a Stand: Moving Beyond Partisan Politics to Unite America,” set to be released later this month. He continued, “My Republican Party, the Republican Party I hope to lead to the White House, is willing to change.”
    Paul, 52, has made reaching out to African-Americans a centerpiece of his political brand as he embarks on his 2016 campaign for president. More than a decade has passed since the Republican Party last won a presidential contest, due in part to the GOP’s struggle with minority voters, a growing segment of the population that has overwhelmingly favored Democrats in recent years.

  • For Everyone To See

    Los Alamos High School. hosted its annual student art show Thursday at the Duane Smith Auditorium. More than 100 pieces of art were on display in several different mediums, including photography, drawing and sculpture.

  • Beer co-op will pop open May 29

    Bathtub Row Brewing, the new brewing cooperative, will open its doors May 29 at Central Park Square.
    The co-op, which is reportedly only the fourth such endeavor in the country, will have a ribbon-cutting ceremony at noon May 29.
    Along with the ribbon-cutting, the grand opening will include music, food and the release of several new beers.
    The festivities are scheduled to continue through May 30 starting at 3 p.m. Co-op members said that the public is invited to attend next weekend’s events.
    According to a press release from the co-op, members will “aim to educate the public about the art and science of brewing,” as well as run a business-friendly and environmentally-friendly establishment.