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Today's News

  • Which of New Mexico’s tribes will be first to test the marijuana industry?

    When will a New Mexico tribe go to pot?
    It’s likely only a question of time until a New Mexico tribe jumps into the marijuana trade, straining the always delicate relationship between our state and local governments and the “domestic dependent nations” within our borders.
    The federal government set the stage for that conflict last year, when the Department of Justice issued its “guidance” on the cultivation, sale and consumption of marijuana on tribal lands: As long as the business is properly regulated, the feds will keep hands off.
    That opened the door to a lucrative new business opportunity for the tribes at the same time gaming is becoming less profitable.
    Here in New Mexico, the tribal “net win” (the amount wagered in the casinos less the payout to lucky bettors) has declined nearly 4 percent over the past three years.
    Those numbers reflect a long-term nationwide trend. The industry has reached maturity, with little room for additional growth.
    The pot business, in contrast, is just beginning to take off. Reliable national figures are hard to come by, but by one estimate the legal marijuana industry grew by 64 percent last year, to more than $2 billion in revenues.

  • Market Activity

    There was plenty going on at the Los Alamos Farmers Market Thursday.

  • Fix UNM’s gender pay gap

    A report shows a gender pay gap at the University of New Mexico to the tune of an almost $15,000 difference between male and female professors.
    According to data from the Chronicle of Higher Education, during the 2013-2014 academic year, the average full-time female professor at UNM earned a salary of $87,417, while the average, full-time male professor made $99,855 — a difference of $12,438.
    Although the gender pay gap is smaller between men and women in the associate professor and instructor positions, male associate professors still earned approximately $2,300 more per year at the school than their female counterparts.
    Chaouki Abdallah, provost of UNM, said the numbers don’t tell the entire story.
    “The most important reason for male professors (having higher average salaries) is that there are colleges and departments with higher salaries. For example, there are more male engineering professors. The lowest paid professors are where females are a majority such as education or the arts. The other reason is that females may delay careers or promotions because of family. Males will also negotiate for more money and females generally don’t,” he said.

  • Humble pump jack is a machine with a message

    It’s so small!
    When State Land Commissioner Aubrey Dunn announced that he was bringing back a pump jack to replace the sculpture in front of the State Land Office, I figured he’d bring a real workhorse. But no, the cute, colorful device installed last week is a diminutive version of the muscular equipment that keeps oil and oil revenues flowing.
    Dunn missed an opportunity.
    In 1979, when Commissioner Alex Armijo made his statement — and riled Santa Fe city officials — he planted a pump jack donated by Mobil that had produced more than 20 million barrels of oil from state trust lands.
    Both men, Armijo a Democrat and Dunn a Republican, wanted to honor the contributions of the oil industry to state coffers and educate the public about where that money comes from.
    It’s a worthy goal. Most people don’t know that the oil and gas industry has been paying for the state’s schools for decades.
    It would have been more educational to install an old piece of equipment with a history, which then would have allowed the Land Office to explain in exhibits how it worked and how the process has changed through the years.

  • Schools sweeten reading challenge

    The Los Alamos School Board and Los Alamos Public Schools have added a little more incentive for students to participate in some summer reading.
    Thanks to a little help from the community, children participating in the “New Mexico True Summer Reading Challenge” will have some extra prizes to look forward to once they reach the July 31 deadline.
    The idea came from a recent Los Alamos school board meeting, where school officials and the board discussed adding some extra prizes for the students who participate.
    As a result of that meeting, as well as conversations with the county, the students can look forward to more than $5,000 worth of extra prizes, thanks to the Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation, LANL Foundation and the Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    The prizes will come in the form of “Chamber Checks,” that winners can use in local businesses.
    For its part, the board also made a motion to contribute up to $1,000 to the fund. The Los Alamos National Laboratory foundation contributed $1,500, LANL itself contributed $1,000, the Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation contributed $1,000 and Los Alamos County contributed $1,000.

  • Okafor, others to get their answers in NBA draft

    NEW YORK (AP) — Jahlil Okafor’s wait is almost over.
    The NBA draft is Thursday night, and the Duke big man will be one of the top picks. He said Wednesday he wished he already knew his destination.
    “I’d be able to sleep better at night if I did. I have no idea,” he said. “It’s been a long process, a lot of fun, but I’m ready for it to be over with so I’ll know where I’m going to be playing.”
    He’s had it much easier than many fellow draft candidates. He worked out for just Minnesota and the Los Angeles Lakers, who own the top two selections.
    But Okafor and fellow center Karl-Anthony Towns of Kentucky were on TV so much that there wasn’t much left for them to show teams, anyway. Even while finishing up his pro season in Spain, Latvian forward Kristaps Porzingis was able to evaluate them.
    “They are good players,” he said, “very athletic, very big, so they’re very talented.”
    Philadelphia picks third for the second straight year, followed by New York and Orlando. Sacramento, Denver, Detroit, Charlotte and Miami round out the top 10.
    Here are some things to watch at Barclays Center in Brooklyn:

  • Splash n Dashes offer training, family fun

    Nobody was overheating at the first Splash n Dash of the summer Wednesday evening.
    After the participants finished swimming in the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center, a nice cool rain started falling as they were running.
    “This is the first one I remember getting rained on,” Bill Dunn of the Los Alamos Triatomics said.
    The rain didn’t stop the event, even though a few people were nice and wet when they finished the swim and the run.
    Times are kept at the Splash n Dashes, but no winners are announced. The events aren’t competitions in themselves, they’re preparation for upcoming competitions.
    “We call it a training a exercise,” Dunn said. “The thinking is a lot of people will do the LA Triathlon. This is a way to track your progress.”
    The Splash n Dashes are a “brick,” which means the athletes do two sports back-to-back. Participants can choose to do a 200-meter swim and then a 3K run, or a 400-meter swim and then a 5K run.
    “What’s cool is you always push yourself harder when you’re enemy is in front of you,” Dunn said. “Once you pass them they’re your friend again, but they’re your enemy when they’re in front of you. That’s the big benefit of group things; you push yourself harder.”

  • Today in history June 25
  • This Week on PAC 8, June 26-July 3

    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC 8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, June 26, 2015
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting – Replay – 6-23-15
    02:00 PM Manhattan Project National Park
    03:00 PM Road to Recovery
    04:00 PM Uprising
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM United in Christ
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “Exploring Mars
    with the Curiosity Mars Rover”
    08:30 PM The Garage
    09:00 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:30 PM Golf Course Opening Ceremony
    10:00 PM FMP Live
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, June 27, 2015
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, June 28, 2015
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • Off The Hill 6-25-15

    Art exhibits
    The photo-eye Gallery in Santa Fe announces two concurrent exhibitions, “Emergent Behavior” by Thomas Jackson and “Home by Nightfall” by Angela Bacon Kidwell. This is the first exhibition by both artists at photo-eye Gallery, 541 S. Guadalupe St. Show runs until July 4.

    Ann Hosfeld and Reg Loving: Nature Diversified. July 3-Aug. 3. at New Concept Gallery in Santa Fe. Opening reception from 5-7 p.m. July 3.

    The 11th Annual Gala Exhibition and Auction on display from June 30 through Aug. 28 will showcase artists from across the U.S. and abroad who find inspiration in Fechin’s legacy, Taos and the creative traditions of the Southwest.

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art announces “Future Parks,” an interactive video and new media exhibition featuring ZB Kids and Team Lab projects and highlighting creative, participatory play for children of all ages. The show runs through July 24 and coincides with the opening later that evening of “Currents” at El Museo. “Currents” is an interactive and kinetic artwork collaboration throughout the railyard.

    Ruth Tatter: Disappearing Act: New Watercolors of Endangered Species at Marigold Arts in Santa Fe. Show runs until July 8.