.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Judge: Academy must release docs in Foster lawsuit

    SANTA FE —A district court judge recently ruled that the New Mexico Law Enforcement Academy must turn over documents relating to an investigation into a Los Alamos police officer’s certification status.
    The motion is connected to a lawsuit filed against Los Alamos County by attorneys George Geran and Linda Hemphill, who are representing three officers who were with the Los Alamos Police Department. The officers are claiming they were wrongfully terminated or forced out of the department by Los Alamos County in order to appease the officer that was being investigated by the academy.
    The former officers suing the county are Randy Foster, Scott Mills and Paige Early. Foster is suing for wrongful termination, and Mills and Early are suing for allegedly being forced out of the department for their role into the investigation into former LAPD officer Brian Schamber.
    The investigation was requested in late 2012 by Foster, who was then acting as police chief of the Los Alamos Police Department.

  • Update 7-19-15

    Breakfast

    The American Legion Post 90 will host a breakfast at its restaurant on Trinity Drive Sunday. The breakfast, which includes eggs, bacon, sausage, pancakes and beverage, will be from 8:30-11 a.m. Tickets are $8. Proceeds go to benefit American Legion programs.

    MOWW

    The July meeting of The Military Order of the World Wars will be at the annual barbecue picnic Tuesday at the Posse Lodge. RSVP by today. Call Norman G. Wilson at 662-9544 or Eleanor Pinyan at 672-3750.

    'Wimpy Kid'

    Fans of the “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” series, in between the ages of 6-12, are invited to an event at Mesa Public Library, which is scheduled for 3 p.m. Monday.

    County Council

    County Council will have a work session at 7 p.m. Tuesday at White Rock Fire Station No. 3.

    LTAB meeting

    The Lodgers’ Tax Advisory Board will meet at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the county’s municipal building.

    Authors Speak

    The Authors Speak Series will continue Thursday with Larry Littlefield, who has published a book about New Mexico wildflowers. Littlefield will give a presentation at Mesa Public Library. It will start at 7 p.m.

  • ECA tackles issues of new park’s sites

    When the Energy Communities Alliance held its conference in Los Alamos this week, it did not discuss its usual issues, such as lobbying for nuclear waste cleanup.
    Instead, this conference was devoted to examining various components related to the launch of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park (MPNHP).
    The group of leaders from Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Hanford, Washington, toured Manhattan era sites behind the fence at Los Alamos National Laboratory, visited the Bradbury Science Museum and spent a day and half exploring various issues related to the creation of the new park.
    Presentations included one by Richard Knox, assistant director of the National Park Service (NPS), who is overseeing NPS’s efforts in developing a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Energy for access and interpretation of sites “behind the fence” at all three locations.
    A session titled, “Implementing the park — A site perspective,” provided insights into the challenges and opportunities related to opening DOE sites to the public. Panelists were NNSA Los Alamos Site Office Environmental Coordinator Pete Maggiore, DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office General Attorney Colin Colverson and Bandelier National Park Superintendent Jason Lott.

  • Births 7-19-15

    July 1: A boy, Marcus Bailey Aaron Matthew DeGood, born to Passion DeGood
    July 7: A boy, Sounak Chakraborty, born to Amrita and Saumen Chakraborty
     

  • People in the News 7-19-15

    Laura Wendelberger, of Los Alamos, has been named to the Dean’s List in the University of Notre Dame’s College of Engineering and College of Science for outstanding scholarship during the Spring 2015 semester.

    ■ ■ ■
    Amanda Ziemann, of Los Alamos, graduated from Rochester Institute of Technology with a Ph.D. in imaging science from RIT’s College of Science in the spring 2014-2015 semester.

    ■ ■ ■

    Morgan Bretzke, of Los Alamos, graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth, with a bachelor’s degree in applied science, public health education and promotion.
     

  • Los Alamos Life: Animal Shelter

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html

    SHELTER HOURS: Noon-6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.

    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.

  • Fiesta de Los Alamos raises funds for parents with sick kids in Juarez

    Imagine your child is sick or injured and has to be hospitalized. In Juarez, Mexico there is an added stress for parents to deal with — there is no accommodations at the hospital for parents to stay with their kids. As a result, parents are forced to sleep on the street outside the medical facility. The Los Alamos STARS program has stepped in to help.
    The very first Fiesta de Los Alamos is being held from 6-10 p.m. July 25 at Fuller Lodge. Proceeds from the event benefits Hospital Infantil de Especialidades in Juarez, as a fundraiser to support a mobile home-like shelter so families no longer have to sleep in the streets.
    Members of the Los Alamos Rotary STARS, a satellite group of the Rotary Club of Los Alamos, have visited the hospital in Juarez twice since March and have witnessed this dilemma first hand. On each visit, the group has met with hospital staff and the parents themselves to better understand what can be done to help.
    “It is an emotional experience to see what these kids are going through and seeing the parents struggle,” said STARS Advisor Jim Nesmith. “It is a project that is near and dear to my heart.” Nesmith has been involved with the program in Juarez since the start.

  • LAYL in need of student volunteers for next school year

    Los Alamos Youth Leadership is seeking volunteers for the next school year.
    Students who sign up will have to commit to the program and projects for the next year.
    LAYL Director Susan Odegard-Fellows said she is hoping for at least 30 students for this year’s program. “The program is in need of high school students who want to make the community a better place.”
    Students at Los Alamos High School have been part of the program, some for many years. Nick Gonzales, an incoming junior is coming up on his third year being involved. He decided to join during his first year of high school because his mother was one of the adult leaders at the time. “I had been in scouts for a long time and thought it would be a fun leadership experience,” Gonzales said.
    The Legacy project he worked on is his favorite contribution to the program so far. It was his idea to install air hand dryer units in the high school gymnasium.
    Gonzales worked through every aspects of the process, from working with the distributor of the product to electrical aspects. He also had to work with the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board (JJAB) to get funding for the project.
    A Legacy Project stays with the community for years to come and for the public to enjoy now and in the future.

  • Pet Talk: Protecting furry friends from killer bees

    Many of us remember our first experience with bees, and it’s usually not positive.
    You may have been the curious kid who got a little too close to the beehive, or you may have been the innocent victim who was stung completely by surprise.
    No matter the situation, the afternoon was spent running and screaming into the house looking for help.
    Although we know better, our pets may think the humming and buzzing of a bee nest sounds like a good time. Before Fido sniffs too close to a dangerous hive, here are the facts you need to know about protecting your pet from killer bees.
    Africanized honeybees, or so called “killer bees,” arrived in the United States during the 1990s. They appear no different than the common European honeybee and can only be told apart by an expert.
    Although the nickname suggests a fatal sting, killer bees are no more harmful than the common honeybee. Killer bees gained their nickname from the aggressive way they defend their nests.
    The more hostile bees readily protecting the nest, the more likely a person or pet is to be stung multiple times.
    Even though it is common for people to have an allergic or even deadly reaction to a bee sting, dogs are not as susceptible to these harmful responses.

  • Solar’s growth due to subsidies

    If you live in the United States, vote, pay taxes and get your electricity from a utility company, you’ve helped the solar power industry through a variety of tax and regulatory policies — voted in by politicians you elected — that favor it over other lower-cost forms of electricity generation.
    When you read headlines such as CNBC’s touting “Solar power’s stunning growth,” realize that it’s thanks to you — even if you’ve never even thought of putting solar panels on your roof or live in an apartment where you couldn’t install them if you wanted to.
    Hoping to benefit from the “stunning growth,” Sunrun Inc., on June 25, filed its initial public offering. Wall Street Journal summarizes, “Sunrun installs solar panels on residential homes either for no upfront cost or at low cost. Sunrun owns the solar panels and receives monthly payments from homeowners for the power generated by the panels. It also receives government tax incentives to cover its costs.”
    Reading through the 234 pages of fine print in Sunrun’s form S-1, it becomes clear that growth comes from government policies.