Today's News

  • Cabin Fever Festival at Jemez Springs set for March 24

    The Village of Jemez Springs is gearing up for a second attempt at its 2018 Cabin Fever Festival.

    A forecast of inclement weather forced postponement of the original date of Feb. 24. Now that a new date has been set organizers are anticipating better weather as they finalize preparations for the annual celebration.

    “Most weather reports were forecasting highs in the low 30s and gusty winds on the day of the event, so to be prudent and fair to our visitors and vendors, we postponed the event,” said Mayor Bob Wilson. “We apologize to those who had planned to attend our Cabin Fever Festival but we hope they will still attend (later this month).”

    The new date for Cabin Fever Festival is March 24 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

    The annual event includes a variety of fun activities, including chain saw carving demonstrations by Sandia Bear Company, a dog costume contest, pie-baking competition, live music and arts and crafts.

    “What we shoot for is a fun community event,” said Wilson. “We bring in some bands and have mostly local vendors. Some of the non-profit groups from the area participate and the forest service always shows up with some of their demonstrations. It’s just meant to be a fun community event.”

  • Hecker to speak at elegant dinner and talk March 19

    President Emeritus of Los Alamos National Laboratory and Stanford University Research Professor Dr. Sig Hecker will be the guest speaker at an elegant dinner and talk set for 5:30-8:30 p.m. March 19 at Las Campanas Clubhouse, 132 Clubhouse Dr., Santa Fe.

    Seating is limited at this event and reservations are required by March 16.

    Hecker will offer his thoughts and opinions on the exclusive “nuclear club,” focusing on North Korea, Russia, and the Iran deal among many other urgent issues in a presentation entitled, “A Tour of the Nuclear World.”

    Hecker is an internationally recognized expert in plutonium science, global threat reduction and nuclear security.

    As discussed recently on 60 Minutes, Hecker has made some extraordinary visits to North Korea to assess its plutonium programs and advances in nuclear weapons – a development that now directly threatens the United States.

    Hecker is a professor in the Department of Management Science and Engineering and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI). He was co-director of Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) from 2007-2012. From 1986 to 1997, Dr. Hecker served as the fifth Director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  • BREAKING: Gov. Martinez vetoes gross receipts tax bill

    Gov. Susana Martinez vetoed a bill Wednesday that would tax the gross receipts of certain non-profits, including any new non-profit contractor to take over management of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    In her message to the senate explaining the veto Wednesday, Martinez said the bill was "poorly crafted tax policy." A proposed amendment would have required all non-profits that make over a certain threshold to pay gross receipts tax, but it was withrawn, she said. Also, she said the bill was another "piecemeal attempt at tax reform."

    Los Alamos County may see a loss of about $22 million a year in gross receipts tax revenue, according to some estimates, if the contract to manage and operate the Los Alamos National Laboratory is awarded to a non-profit entity. Martinez said that while the loss of gross receipts tax is a concern, it may be less than what some claim it will be, as subcontractors will become taxable.

    State Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard (D-43) said the amendment, which she said was recommended by State Rep. and House Taxation and Revenue Committee member Jason Harper (R-57) would have left Los Alamos without GRT revenue for a year if the bill included it.

  • SF Native Plant Society lecture March 21

    Richard Cahal Thompson, Santa Fe parks division director will give a free talk during the Santa Fe Chapter of the Native Plant Society of New Mexico meeting at Christ Lutheran Church at 6:30 p.m. March 21.

    The talk is entitled “The Face of Change.” It concerns the possibility of planting more native plants in Santa Fe.
    Cahal earned a bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics from TAMU Kingsville. Upon graduation, he moved into municipal forestry with the City of San Antonio.

    He was then promoted to River Walk horticulturist, River Operations supervisor, horticulturist II, and then senior horticulturist.  Since leaving San Antonio, he worked as a contract Forester, Urban Forester, parks superintendent, project manager, and is now parks division director in Santa Fe.

     The meeting will be held at Christ Lutheran Church, at 1701 Arroyo Chamiso, located in the triangle of Old Pecos Trail, St. Michael’s Drive and Arroyo Chamiso. It is directly across the street from Fire Station No. 4. Meetings and talks are free and open to all. For more information, email Dr. Tom Antonio: tom@thomasantonio.org or call 690-5105.

  • Audubon NM picks new director

    Audubon New Mexico announced March 1 the appointment of Paul Tashjian as Associate Director of Freshwater Conservation.

    Tashjian will further bolster Audubon New Mexico’s innovative freshwater conservation program to address the many challenges the state is facing regarding significant declining river flows, and the impact it has on birds, wildlife and New Mexicans.

    Tashjian, a longtime resident of New Mexico, will lead Audubon New Mexico’s multi-faceted Freshwater Conservation Program along with Beth Bardwell, Director of Conservation effective March 5, 2018. He will direct efforts to develop and implement policy, market-based, restoration and strategic engagement strategies to protect and restore natural ecosystems for communities, birds and other wildlife on New Mexico’s major rivers and tributaries, with a focus on the Rio Grande and Colorado River Basins.

    “I’m very excited to be working with Audubon New Mexico on water and wildlife conservation issues, said Paul Tashjian. “I love our State’s rivers and wetlands and have spent much of my time stomping around these magical places.”

  • Pen fair set for Saturday at DeVargas Mall

    Santa Fe Pens is hosting the 23rd Annual Santa Fe Pen Fair from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and from noon-5 p.m. Sunday at the store located at DeVargas Center, 179 A, Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe.

    Following a 20-year run at the now-closed Sanbusco location, Santa Fe Pens, as part of the event, will unveil its Santa Fe Edition XX fountain and roller ball pens.

    “This year, we’re bringing back our free calligraphy seminars for children (age 8 and up) and adults. Our newest employee, Shawn Hayden, will teach basic calligraphy lettering techniques at 1:30 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday,” said Neal Frank, Santa Fe Pens owner.

  • Geisik arrested for parole violation

    New Mexico State Police arrested former Los Alamos resident Stephen M. Geisik on charges he violated conditions of his parole stemming from 2015 sexual misconduct charges.

    Geisik, 27, of Hernandez, was arrested on Feb. 23 and is being held in the Los Alamos County Detention Center. A notice of alleged probation violation, of reopening of case and of hearing has been filed in district court and he will appear before Judge Mary Marlowe-Sommer at 9 a.m. on March 15 in Santa Fe.

    On April 6, 2015, Geisik was sentenced to 20 years, four days probation for two counts of criminal sexual contact of minor second degree (child under 13) and contributing to the delinquency of minor.

    He was released to supervised probation and required to register as a sex offender in Los Alamos County.

    Geisik moved to Hernandez on July 5, 2017, and registered as a sex offender with the Rio Arriba County Sheriff’s Department in Española.

    On Feb. 23 he was arrested by New Mexico State Police and charged with Abuse of a Child-Negligently Cause (no death or great bodily harm) and Abuse of a Child-Intentional (no death or great bodily harm) and was transported without incident to LACDC.

  • Governor approves most public safety reforms

    SANTA FE (AP) — A package of public safety reforms designed to bolster police ranks, deter repeat drunken driving, toughen gun-possession penalties for violent felons in New Mexico has been signed by Republican Gov. Susana Martinez with some reluctance.

    Martinez indicated her overall disappointment as she signed the bundled reforms on Wednesday with a partial veto. She says the rejected provisions would interfere with the state's authority to suspend driver's licenses for failures to appear in court.

    The governor is accusing the Legislature of clinging to the status quo on public safety issues amid increased reports of crime in cities including Albuquerque.

    During a 30-day session that ended in February, Republican and Democratic lawmakers rallied around reforms that also aim to better address addiction and health issues among prison inmates as they are released.

  • Forecasters: New Mexico marks another warm month

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico has wrapped up another warm winter month.

    Forecasters with the National Weather Service in Albuquerque say the temperature was 3.5 degrees above normal for February, making it the 18th warmest on record for New Mexico.

    As for precipitation, the data shows the state was 0.06 inches (1.5 millimeters) above normal.

    Despite dismal snowpack levels so far this winter and a dry start to March, the forecast calls for a low pressure system to move into the Southwest with abundant moisture late this week.

    A back-door cold front is expected to slide into eastern New Mexico and through the Rio Grande Valley, and forecasters say chances for rain and snow could increase Sunday and Monday.

  • Businessman, scientist Ryti to run for council

    Randall Ryti believes his experience as a scientist, a small business owner and an active participant in Los Alamos organizations demonstrates he has the qualifications and enthusiasm needed to be a viable member of the County Council.

    “I value my past opportunities to serve our community, and I want to play a larger role in our community’s future by serving on the County Council,” he said in announcing his candidacy on March 3. “I will bring my leadership skills to this office. I graduated from Leadership Los Alamos in 2005 and that course helped to inform me, as a citizen, to better lead my business and to prompt me to take leadership roles in community activities.”

    Ryti, who is running as a Democrat, has lived in Los Alamos since 1992, raising a family and starting a business here.

    “I came to start a small business, Neptune and Company, with three other scientists,” he said. “My wife Wendy and our two children arrived a year later. My family stayed here because Los Alamos has offered us so many opportunities.”