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Today's News

  • Pet Talk: Household toxicities

    Although we may be extra cautious when using household cleaners, automotive products, or pest control products in our homes and gardens, it may come as a surprise that the tasty morsel we just dropped while preparing dinner could endanger our best friend.
    Chocolate can be found lying around the majority of households, especially during the holidays. Depending on the size and type of chocolate, it can be very dangerous to your pet’s health if consumed.
    Make sure that your children are aware of this, as they might think they’re treating Fido by sneaking him a piece of chocolate cake under the dinner table. If your dog does get a hold of some, chocolate is absorbed within about an hour, so you should call your veterinarian immediately.
    “Additionally, grapes and raisins can cause renal failure in dogs if eaten,” said Dr. James Barr, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.
    “The exact cause of this is unknown, and the amount that needs to be consumed in order to be poisonous is unknown as well.”

  • Is your teen ready for a summer job?

    For many teens, there’s nothing more exciting than receiving the first paycheck from a summer job — a sure-fire ticket to fun and freedom. It’s also a great opportunity for parents to encourage proper money management.
    Parents or guardians need to do some necessary paperwork first. Working teens will need his or her own Social Security Number (SSN) to legally apply for a job. They will also need a SSN to open a bank account to deposit their paychecks. Depending on state law, children under 18 may have to open bank accounts in their custodial name with their parents or guardians. It is also important for parents to check in with qualified tax or financial advisors about their teen’s earned income, particularly if it may affect any investments under the child’s name.

  • The true gentleman

    The recent report of Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s video-recording its members chanting a racist song wasn’t really what I would call news.
    A bunch of college boys sing proudly and loudly using the N-word in celebration of their promise to exclude blacks from membership in their club?
    “There will never be a n----r at SAE.  You can hang him from a tree, but he’ll never sign with me!”
    That’s not news. Making fun of others to exclude them from one’s clique is an old and proud American tradition. And you don’t mess with tradition!
    Like many people, I was disgusted when viewing the video, saddened to see how little has changed in so many years. And like many, I cheered when the chant-leaders were expelled and the fraternity was kicked off campus.
    The SAE Fraternity Manual declares SAE as “The Singing Fraternity,” boasting that it has “many songs that our members should learn.”
    I’m guessing that the members might want to take that out of their manual now.
    The fraternity’s motto is “The True Gentleman,” and its mission statement defines this as “the man whose conduct proceeds from good will and an acute sense of propriety,” adding “one who thinks of the rights and feelings of others.”

  • Today in history March 21
  • LA baseball and tennis teams fall

    Baseball

    The Los Alamos baseball team was unable to give Fruita-Monument (Colo.) its first loss of the season Friday in the semifinals of Piedra Vista tournament. The ’Toppers fell to the Wildcats, 7-3.
    Fruita (7-0) hit five doubles in the game to take down Los Alamos (6-4).

    Tennis

    The Los Alamos girls tennis team lost a close match against La Cueva Friday, 5-4.
    The ’Toppers got wins at No. 1, 2 and 3 singles.
    Sidra Hsieh-Ratliff beat Janelle Lee 6-3, 6-2 at No. 1.
    Laura Whicker took down Riley Cook, 7-5, 6-1 at No. 2.
    At No. 3 singles, Lauryn Anaya won against Corrine Vaughan 7-6, 1-6 and 0-0 (1-0).
    La Cueva, however, won at No. 4, 5 and 6 singles and then took two of the three doubles matches to win the contest.
    Lauren Fugate and Astrid Hengartner both lost hard-fought matches in the three sets.
    Whicker and Katya Skurikhin won at No. 2 doubles for Los Alamos, 6-3, 7-5 against Vaughan and Alex Mosey.
    The dual loss was the Hilltopper girls first of the season.
    Los Alamos’ boys tennis team also lost to La Cueva, 9-0.
    No. 2 singles player George Margevicious was the only Hilltopper to boy to win a set against La Cueva, but lost his match 7-5, 1-6 and 0-0 (10-6) to Joe Cooper.

  • Altmann, world tour on hold in Alaska

    The Freeride World Tour (FWT) stop in Haines, Alaska, has turned into a balancing act of patience and alertness.
    The big mountain competition originally scheduled to take place on Tuesday.
    All of the competitors hopped in a helicopter for a 30-minute ride to a staging area. Then they jumped in another helicopter for a 10-minute ride to the peak where the competition will take place on, aptly named The Venue.
    Then clouds rolled in and the event was postponed because of the flat light.
    On Thursday the forecast looked promising, so once again the competitors made their way to the start. After waiting on the top of The Venue for four hours, however, the visibility showed no sign of improving so the event was postponed again.
    On Friday the forecast looked good and the competitors were optimistic they’d finally be able to compete.
    The helicopter rides up to The Venue were once again in vain.
    With a new storm in Alaska’s forecast, the event’s organizers are now shooting for a Sunday or Monday start.
    It was originally scheduled to take place before March 22. That date has been pushed back, keeping the ambitious Alaska dream alive.

  • State roundup: Aggies fall in opening round of NCAA tourney

    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Second-seeded Kansas did its best to restore some luster to the Big 12.
    Well, at least scrub away some of the tarnish.
    Frank Mason III scored 17 points to lead a balanced attack, and the Jayhawks rolled to a 75-56 victory over No. 15 seed New Mexico State on Friday, giving their beleaguered conference its first NCAA Tournament victory in four tries this March.
    Perry Ellis added nine points for the Jayhawks (27-8), who did their part in setting up a tantalizing matchup with seventh-seeded Wichita State in the Midwest Region’s round of 32.
    The Shockers played No. 10 seed Indiana in their opening game later Friday.
    DK Eldridge had 11 points and Remi Barry and Tshilidzi Nephawa scored 10 each for the Aggies (23-11), who had won 13 straight while sweeping the Western Athletic Conference regular-season and tournament titles.
    After a stunning day of upsets Thursday, lowlighted by an 0-3 mark from the mighty Big 12, the Jayhawks made sure to rob any drama from its opener at the CenturyLink Center.
    They shot holes in the Aggies’ unorthodox zone, going 9 of 13 from beyond the arc. They turned just about every turnover into a run-out. And they ran ragged New Mexico State’s veteran starters, who had not allowed an opponent to score 70 points in 24 straight games.

  • Feds tighten fracking rules

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration said Friday it is requiring companies that drill for oil and natural gas on federal lands to disclose chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing operations, a controversial drilling technique that has sparked an ongoing boom in natural gas production across the country.
    A rule to take effect in June also updates requirements for well construction and disposal of water and other fluids used in fracking, as the drilling method is more commonly known.
    The rule has been under consideration for more than three years, drawing criticism from the oil and gas industry and environmental groups alike. The industry fears federal regulation could duplicate efforts by states and hinder the drilling boom, while some environmental groups worry that lenient rules could allow unsafe drilling techniques to pollute groundwater.
    Reaction to the rule was immediate. An industry group announced it was filing a lawsuit to block the regulaion and the Republican chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee announced legislation to keep fracking regulations under state management.

  • Local experts say state lags in economic recovery

    Many members of the Los Alamos business community were on hand to learn more about the area’s economic outlook at Thursday’s Chamber Breakfast.
    Panelists Jeffrey Mitchell, director of the University of New Mexico’s Bureau of Business and Economic Research, REDI manager for the Regional Development Corporation Eric Vasquez and Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation Executive Director Patrick Sullivan all indicated that the local economy shows signs of improvement, but that New Mexico — and Northern New Mexico in particular — have lagged behind the rest of the nation in economic recovery.
    “New Mexico’s ‘recovery’ has been sluggish at best,” Mitchell said, after highlighting several signs of economic recovery for most of the nation. “Of the 50 states plus D.C., there are only three states, I believe, that still have employment levels below those of the pre-recession period, and New Mexico is one of them. This has had a very significant impact on labor force.”
    New Mexico employment levels remain at 4 percent below pre-recession levels.
    According to Mitchell, indicators are that New Mexico will see slow, “unspectacular” growth, not reaching 2007 levels of economic activity until 2017. Most of the nation reached that in 2013.

  • Dawn Brown gets board recognition

    The New Mexico School Boards Association recently awarded its Excellence for Student Achievement Award to several students as well as district employees for their work in either attaining excellence as a student or helping Los Alamos students attain that excellence.
    The nominees, as well as the winner, were presented with certificates at the most recent Los Alamos School Board meeting.
    Dawn Brown won the award for her work in organizing the school district’s science fair each year. She will be receiving a plaque at the next meeting.
    Other nominees included Los Alamos High School Student Estaban Abeyta, Los Alamos High School Principal Debbie Belew-Nyquist, Student Services Coordinator Karla Crane, Special Education Teacher Dana Kline, YMCA After School Director Andrea Lynch, Los Alamos High School Teacher Lynn Ovaska, Special Education Teacher Christine Peters, Juvenile Justice Advisory Board Youth Resource Advocate Troy Palmer, Los Alamos High School Teacher John Pawlak and Los Alamos Public Schools Technology Support Teacher Lorraine Whalen.