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Today's News

  • Girls, boys soccer teams tie Bosque

    Los Alamos' girls and boys soccer teams both tied Bosque Tuesday afternoon in Albuquerque.

    The Hilltopper girls tied the Bobcats, 1-1.

    "I think we dominatd the game, we just couldn't finish," Los Alamos girls head coach Gary Ahlers said.

    After Bosque scored in the first half, Claire Ticknor scored Los Alamos' goal in the second half to even things up. Ticknor stole a pass and scored from about 25 yards out.

    The Hilltopper girls are now 0-1-1. Bosque's girls are 0-0-1.

    The Hilltopper boys then stepped on the field for their first game of the season and ended up with the same result as the girls. The Hilltopper boys tied Bosque, 2-2.

    "For our first game out against a strong opponent, I thought we played well," Los Alamos boys head coach Ron Blue said.

    Los Alamos scored first in the contest — Joe Singleton assisted DC Kim — and led 1-0 at halftime.

    In the second half, Bosque tied the game, 1-1.

    Andreas Runde then placed a free kick near the goal and Alex Csanadi headed it in to put Los Alamos back on top, 2-1.

    Bosque, however, tied the game on a penalty kick and the game remained notched at two through two overtimes.

  • Today In History Aug. 26
  • Seeing Red

    One of the most popular bands in Los Alamos County, the Red Elvises, entertained the crowd at the Relay for Life event Friday night at Ashley Pond.

  • Initiatives will try to spur on clean energy

    On Monday, President Barack Obama announced more than $1 billion in Department of Energy initiatives to drive innovation and accelerate the clean energy economy.
    As part of the President’s Clean Power Plan, DOE’s Loan Programs Office (LPO) is making up to $1 billion in loan guarantees available to support commercial-scale distributed energy projects, such as rooftop solar with storage and smart grid technology.
    In addition, through the Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy (ARPA-E), DOE is awarding $24 million in funding for 11 high-performance solar power projects that the government believes can serve lower the cost and improve the performance of solar photovoltaic (PV) power systems.
    According to the DOE, “these initiatives will spur innovation, ensure grid reliability and help ensure America’s low-carbon energy future.”

  • The New Digs

    The new Los Alamos Teen Center was unveiled Monday. The Teen Center, for high school-aged students in the county, features games, a big screen TV and a computer lounge for those looking for a place to relax. The new area is located on the upper floor of the Community Building, by Ashley Pond. It had been hosted for the past several years at the Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church.

  • July was wet, cool in county

    The wet spring and summer, that started in May, continued all the way through July, according to researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Rainfall was well above average in July according to the lab’s measurements. In Los Alamos, average rainfall was nearly double what happens during the month, with the townsite recording 6.68 inches.
    At least one weather record, that has stood for 44 years, was broken on July 20, when Los Alamos received 1.44 inches of rain, far and away the most it had ever gotten on that particular day — the previous record was .95 inches set in 1971.
    LANL said that through the month Los Alamos has received nearly 15.5 inches of rain this year, which is the most total rainfall since 1949 and more than 5.5 inches above normal.
    David Bruggerman, a meteorologist with LANL, said the Climate Prediction Center is expecting above-average rainfall through October.
    Neither Los Alamos nor White Rock were as warm last month, however, breaking a trend of warm weather seen in June.
    In the first half of July, the mean maximum temperature was 3.1 degrees below average and White Rock was 4.4 degrees below average.
    Lower temperatures were also expected by the Climate Prediction Center through the rest of the summer and early fall.

  • Scorpions prevail in girls soccer opener

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls soccer team fell behind near halftime of Saturday’s opening game of the season as it struggled to generate offense.
    Los Alamos took on the Farmington Scorpions in the first game of 2015 for any sport at the high school. Farmington, which sports one of the most seasoned rosters of any team in Class 5A, didn’t light things up, either, but set itself up with enough chances to stay on top.
    Hannah Kelley of Farmington came through with goals late in the first half and early in the second half to help the Scorpions score a 3-1 win at Sullivan Field.
    Kelley took advantage of a miscue late in the half, while another Hilltopper miscue would lead to a big insurance goal after Los Alamos had worked its way back to within striking distance midway through the second half.
    Los Alamos forward Sienna Ahlers scored at the 57-minute mark. Ahlers, who will be charged with the task of shoring up a front line that lost its primary weapon, Catie McDonald, over the offseason, blew through the Farmington defense on a charge down the left hashmark.
    Ahlers found daylight between three converging Farmington defenders and went to the near post against Bailey Carter for the first Los Alamos score of the season.

  • Today in history Aug. 25
  • Entrance fee waived Tuesday at Bandelier

    There will be no entrance fee to Bandelier National Monument, or any other national park or monument, all day Tuesday.

    Bandelier is waiving the entrance fee as part of the National Park Service Founders Day. The NPS is turning 99 years old on Tuesday.

    For more information, call Bandelier National Monument at 672-3861.

  • Stocks slump; Dow ends down 588 after early 1,000-pt. slide

    U.S. stocks slid again Monday, with the Dow Jones industrial average briefly plunging more than 1,000 points in a sell-off that sent a shiver of fear from Wall Street to Main Street.

    Stocks regained some of that ground as the day wore on, but the Dow finished with a loss of 588 points, the eighth-worst single-day point decline and the second straight fall of more than 500.

    The slump — part of a global wave of selling touched off by signs of a slowdown in China — triggered worries among Wall Street professionals and among ordinary Americans who have been saving for retirement or a down payment on a house.

    With the lease on her car up, health insurance worker Deirdre Ralph of Wayne, New Jersey, had planned to get a less pricey vehicle and invest the savings. Now she's having doubts.

    "That money, I wanted to take and put it toward my retirement," said Ralph, 61. "Should I? Or should I just have a great old time?"

    The Standard & Poor's 500 index also fell sharply shortly after the opening bell, entering "correction" territory — Wall Street jargon for a drop of 10 percent or more from a recent peak. The last market correction was nearly four years ago.