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Today's News

  • Business altruism pays off even when payoff isn’t the point

    For many businesses, philanthropic giving has an element of self-interest: It’s giving with the expectation of getting something back in the form of tax breaks and image building.

    But more and more businesses are discovering that unselfish giving has a value that’s immeasurable and that reverberates throughout the community, the workforce and the economy. 

    Community quality of life 

    Businesses that create and nurture an organizational culture based on gratitude can drive significant change that benefits everyone, not just their customers, especially if they can involve likeminded entrepreneurs.

    When a business spearheads a project that solves a local problem or provides a public service, such as building a bike path or setting aside company land for habitat restoration, it demonstrates an investment in the city or town in which it’s based and a commitment to making the host community a better place for everyone to live and work. 

  • How do you get middle school girls hooked on STEM?

    Although women comprise a small fraction of tech professionals—just one in four, according to the National Center for Women & Information Technology —several nonprofits and startups are working to jumpstart women’s participation in computer science.

    In a previous column, I considered Grace Hopper Academy, a New York City coding bootcamp designed explicitly for women. GHA’s sister school, Fullstack Academy, takes that program online with a Remote Immersive program. Most recently, I examined how the Campaign for Female Education (Camfed) has expanded female educational access in sub-Saharan Africa using big data. But what about middle school girls here in the United States?

    Middle school is perhaps the most prudent place to promote female participation in STEM, according to several studies. Given that many girls rule out tech careers by high school, educators and administrators would be wise to pique student interest before it’s too late. A Philadelphia-based non-profit called TechGirlz takes that challenge seriously.

  • Animal Shelter

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday. 

    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out Petfinder website for pictures of adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.

    CATS 

    Noel—A big, fluffy calico kitty who loves to snuggle! She is approximately 7 years old, and she came to the shelter when her owner had to move into assisted living. She loves attention and enjoys being held; she also enjoys being petted, as long as you steer clear of her big belly! Noel is playful with both adults and children, and she loves playing with string toys.

  • Pesky peacocks pose problems for Newton’s neighbors in Vegas

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Feathers are flying in the neighborhood around Wayne Newton’s estate, where residents are complaining that peafowl like the ones on the Las Vegas showman’s 40-acre ranch have become roosting, roaming pests.

    Residents who live near Casa de Shenandoah claim peafowl from the ranch wander the neighborhood — squawking, scratching family cars and creating a traffic hazard.

    “We heard something on our roof that scared us to death,” April Juelke told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. “We thought a burglar was breaking in, but it was a bunch of peacocks.”

    The Juelkes and others say the birds roost at the ranch. The couple say their Labrador retriever, Reginald Winthorp, has twice had intestinal illnesses that they blame on bird droppings.

    Newton’s lawyer, Jay Brown, said the birds aren’t Newton’s.

     

    “We’ve never bought a peacock. We’ve never brought in a peacock,” Brown said.

  • Mountaineers meeting set for Tuesday

     The Los Alamos Mountaineers will host speakers and adventurers Kelly Gallagher and Don Krier at their meeting that starts at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday at the Nature Center.

    Gallagher and Krier will give a presentation about “Adventures in the Alps: Mont Blanc and Matterhorn.” The two speakers will talk about the several days of acclimatization in the French and Swiss alps that they spent climbing peaks and traversing glaciers to prepare for ascents of Mont Blanc and Matterhorn. They experienced fabulous weather and good health, and drank quite a bit of Génépi and overindulged on gelato. This talk describes the gorgeous setting and routes for their two weeks of alpine climbing.

    The social at 6:45 p.m., followed by reports of recent and upcoming trips at 7 p.m. Program starts at 7:30 p.m.

  • Community Calendar

    TODAY

    Feature Film: “Black Holes” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Voyage through the galaxies in search of answers to explain the riddles of black holes! Cost is  $6 for adults, $4 for children. 

    MONDAY

    Nature Playtimes at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join local families for fun in nature. Free. 

    TUESDAY

    Kiwanis meets from noon to 1 p.m. in Kelly Hall at Trinity-on-the-Hill Episcopal Church, 3900 Trinity Drive. Committee Day.

     

    A Mountaineer’s Story: Climbing the Alps at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Meet an adventurer. Be inspired. Plan your next expedition. Free.

    The local chapter of the AARP will have a meeting from 9:30-11:30 a.m. in the Betty Ehart Senior Center classroom. The public is invited to the Senior Housing Forum with a panelist of Realtor Kelly Myers, contractor Carl Thomas, Cynthia Goldblatt from Aspen Ridge, Paul Andrus, Andrew Harnden and Steve Brugger. Coffee and juice will be offered beginning at 9 a.m.

    FRIDAY

  • News for Retirees

    Nov. 20-26

    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

     

    Betty Ehart

     

     

    MONDAY

    8:45 a.m. Cardio

    10 a.m. Senior Civic Discussion Group

    10 a.m. Advisory Board Meeting

    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Manhattan Clam Chowder

    6 p.m. Argentine Tango Dancing

  • Experience leads LA to 2016-17 season

    The last two seasons, the Los Alamos boy's basketball team was enforced by a plethora of young players.

    Those players are now juniors and seniors and they are the leaders of the program.

    The Hilltoppers begin their 2016-17 season by hosting Valencia at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Griffith Gym.

    "We've been telling them since last summer that it's their program now," said Mike Kluk, who's entering his fourth season as Los Alamos coach. "It's critical that they step up and own it. They're all upperclassmen now and we're starting see a bit more maturity compared to last year."

    Every player on the Los Alamos roster this season is either a senior or junior.

    One of the experienced pieces that the Hilltoppers will rely on in 2016-17 is 6-foot junior guard Jack Stewart.  

    "There's been a lot of potential these past couple seasons and we're just looking to build off of that," Stewart said. "We're all maturing so I think it's going to be good this season."

    Kluk said he implemented a new offensive scheme during the offseason. And the team has adapted well to the new offense, according to Kluk.

  • Births

    Nov. 8 —A girl. Mae Taylor Casleton. Emily and Dave Casleton.

    Nov. 10 — A boy. Born to Saaish Trideep Rajale. Shikha Sharma and Trideep Ragale.

    Nov. 12 —A boy. Logan John Huber. Born to Katharine and Keith Huber.

    Nov. 13 — A girl.  Elizabeth Marie Madril. Born to Kerry and Patrick Madril. 

  • ‘Toppers swimming places 2nd in Barney Relays

    The boys and girls Hilltoppers did just that finishing in second place, respectively, at the Peter B. Barney Memorial Relays on Saturday in Albuquerque. Host Albuquerque Academy’s boys and girls squads placed first in the meet. 

    The Hilltoppers were led by the mixed 8x50 yard freestyle relay team, which not only finished in first place, but it also broke the Barney Relays record. The Los Alamos mixed 400-yard freestyle relay finished in second. 

    On the girl’s side, the Hilltoppers 200-yard backstroke relay team finished in first with a combined time 2:17.12. The 200-yard medley relay and 400-yard individual medley relay teams both earned second place finishes. The 200-yard butterfly relay and 200-yard freestyle relays teams placed in third. 

    The Los Alamos girls finished with 130 total points. 

    The 200-yard medley relay team led Los Alamos on the boy’s side with first place finish (3:24.13). 

    In the 400-yard individual medley relay and the 200-yard medley relay, the Hilltoppers finished in second place. The 200-yard freestyle and breaststroke relay teams placed third, while Los Alamos got a fourth-place finish from the 200-yard backstroke relay team.