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Today's News

  • BPU selects Glasco as utilities manager pending Council approval

     

    Board of Public Utilities Vice Chair Chris Ortega announced Thursday that the Board selected Tim Glasco to lead the Department of Public Utilities as utilities manager.  The Board’s selection will go to Los Alamos County Council on April 29 for approval.  If approved, Glasco will replace utilities manager John Arrowsmith, who plans to retire from the Department this July. 

    Approximately 25 applications from around the country were received for the Utilities Manager position.  The board, the council liaison, and the county administrator screened applications. 

    This group narrowed the applications down to five finalists, all of whom work for Los Alamos County. 

    Finalists included James Alarid,  Steve Cummins, Philo Shelton, Robert Westervelt and Glasco.

    Three different panels then interviewed the candidates. They included the Board of Public Utilities including the Council Liaison and County Administrator; The Los Alamos County senior staff, and a panel of three Los Alamos citizens. 

  • Foster applies for Santa Fe top job

    Former Los Alamos County Police Commander Randy Foster is one of 48 applicants for the Santa Fe Police Department chief job, according to a report in the Albuquerque Journal.
    According to the Albuquerque Journal, other candidates include Española chief Eric Garcia, former Los Lunas chief Roy Melnick, former state police chief Carlos Maldonado. Melnick and Garcia applied for the Los Alamos job after Wayne Torpy retired. The Los Alamos job was filled by present chief Dino Sgambellone, who came to town from Mansfield, Ohio.
    Foster, meanwhile, lost his job following former Los Alamos Police Department Detective Brian Schamber’s involuntary confinement at the New Mexico Behavioral Health Institute for 10 days in late December 2012.
    Foster, former commander Scott Mills and detective Paige Early then filed suit against the county, alleging wrongful discharge, retaliation and gender discrimination.
    A scheduling conference has been scheduled for district court in Santa Fe on April 23.
    Foster, meanwhile, lives in White Rock and is now a deputy with the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Department.
    According to the Albuquerque Journal, Santa Fe mayor Javier Gonzales has formed a citizen committee to screen the 48 applicants.

  • Chopper crashes at UNM hospital

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Investigators are trying to determine what caused a medical helicopter to crash while taking off from the roof of New Mexico’s only top-level trauma center. Officials said all three people aboard escaped serious injury.
    The male pilot was reported in satisfactory condition and the two crew members, a man and a woman, were under observation after the crash at University of New Mexico Hospital in Albuquerque, authorities said. No further information was available on their conditions.
    No patients were aboard the chopper when it went down during takeoff Wednesday.
    Federal Aviation Administration investigators were beginning an investigation, agency spokesman Lynn Lunsford said.
    Though the cause of the crash wasn’t immediately clear, witnesses said they felt a gust of wind at about 5:45 p.m. and saw the PHI Air Medical helicopter wobble as it started to take off from the helipad atop the six-story building. It came to rest on its side, and the damaged tail section could be seen hanging over the edge of the roof. “They were taking off and had already dropped off their patient when it happened,” said hospital spokesman Billy Sparks.

  • LANL historian to speak at MOWW meeting

    Alan Carr, a historian who specializes in the history of Los Alamos National Laboratory, will present a talk on LANL involvement in the 1970-92 period of the Cold War. He will be guest speaker for the April 15 dinner meeting of the Major General Franklin E. Miles Chapter 229 of The Military Order of the World Wars at the Los Alamos County Research Park.
    The talk will be in the main meeting room. It begins with a social hour at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m. Carr’s presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m. The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to interested citizens for the dinner and program with RSVP, or the program only at no cost.
    The Hot Rocks Java Cafe staff is catering the buffet dinner; entrée is expected to be meat loaf with corn, salad, desert and rolls. Cost of the dinner is $25 per person. A dinner reservation made is a commitment to the chapter to pay for the reserved dinner(s). RSVP for the dinner is needed by Sunday.
     Call or email LTC Gregg Giesler USA Retired, Chapter Commander, 662-5574 (email g.giesler@computer.org) or Lt. Col. Norman G. Wilson, USAF Retired, Chapter Adjutant, 662-9544 (email NrmWil5@cs.com).

  • Update 04-10-14

    Volunteer event

     Annual Volunteer Appreciation Event. 3-5 p.m Friday at the Betty Ehart Center. For more information, call 471-2777 or 888-296-2411, ext. 3690.

    Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. April 17 in a special session in council chambers.

    Lecture

    Waterfalls of New Mexico. 7 p.m. today at PEEC. Join Doug Scott and PEEC for a slideshow and lecture on the waterfalls of New Mexico.

    Board openings

    The deadline is quickly approaching for those interested in volunteering time to represent Los Alamos County on two economic development boards that have current openings on their Board of Directors. Both the Regional Development Corporation (RDC) and the North Central New Mexico Economic Development District (NMNMEDD) have vacancies and have asked the County Council to forward recommendations to them. To be considered, submit a one-page letter of interest to County Administrator Harry Burgess no later than 5 p.m. Monday. For details, visit the News and Alerts page at
    losalamosnm.us.

  • Vintage jewelry leads trip down memory lane

    When entering Mrs. Beadsley’s Vintage Jewelry Store, it is like walking into a giant jewelry box. Every inch of the cozy space holds costume jewelry and items from a different time. Its major draw is for people who “love old stuff.”
    Owner Debra Lowenstein opened the shop in March at 2101 Trinity Drive, Suite G. She has lived in Los Alamos two years, having come from Santa Fe, where she had a similar costume jewelry shop, first in a kiosk at DeVargas Mall, then in the Railyard.
    She keeps a plethora of loose rhinestones, beads, clasps and pads for clip-on earrings. She has knowledge in restoration and repairs, such as necklace restringing. She said that since she has opened she has done hundreds of restrings for customers.
    “It’s a challenge to make something look as if it has always looked like that,” she said, adding that it is a way for someone to keep enjoying the jewelry for years to come.
    Lowenstein laments that today’s jewelry is not made like it used to and the quality has diminished due to machine-made pieces. “Things were made by hand back in the day and people were frugal and took great care in what they had,” Lowenstein said. “The heyday for costume jewelry spanned from the 1920s to 1960s, before the human touch was lost.”

  • Geese Come Marching In

    Everybody seems to be enjoying the nice spring weather in Los Alamos as a couple of geese take advantage of it at Ashley Pond.

  • Be There 04-10-14

    Today
    The April meeting of the Los Alamos Genealogical Association will be 7 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library. The program is “Genealogical Potpourri” and will feature an inspiring story about Scottish Heritage, some discussion questions, and some genealogical tidbits from you tube. The traditional no-host dinner will begin at 5:30 p.m. at the China Moon restaurant.

    Waterfalls of New Mexico. 7 p.m. Join Doug Scott and PEEC for a slideshow and lecture on the waterfalls of New Mexico. Of special interest is that a new 80-foot high waterfall is being formed this year, and Scott is documenting this formation. Free. No advance registration is required. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.
    Friday
    Annual Volunteer Appreciation Event. 3-5 p.m. at the Betty Ehart Center. For more information, call 471-2777 or 888-296-2411, ext. 3690.
    Saturday
    Drawing Workshop. 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. PEEC is very fortunate to have Lisa Coddington will teach a workshop about using simple drawing materials to portray furry, feathery and slimy animals such as those found at PEEC, or around the Pajarito Plateau. $45/$36 PEEC members. For more information and to register, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

  • Health seminars factor into community

    The month of April has many health-awareness workshops offered to caregivers and those who suffer from such aliments as Alzheimer’s and Dementia, Diabetes and Melanoma.
    Free Alzheimer’s education offered in Spanish. The Alzheimer’s Association, New Mexico Chapter will present a course in Spanish specifically designed for people caring for loved ones with Alzheimer’s or other dementia. “Cuidando con Respeto,” is an intensive training will meet over two days from 1-4 p.m. April 19 and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 20. The class will be at San Isidro Catholic Church, 3552 Agua Fria St. in Santa Fe.
    These sessions will teach caregivers practical techniques for interacting with loved ones with Alzheimer’s, for long-term planning and for coping with associated stresses. The course also explains the signs, behaviors and pathology of Alzheimer’s disease.
    The course attempts to impart burnout-avoidance methods to a population, which is u nder chronic emotional duress. More than 60 percent of family caregivers for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia rate their emotional stress from care giving as high or very high, and about 33 percent of Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers report symptoms of depression.

  • Novel recounts search for Turquoise

    The Irishman who helped Charles L. Tiffany and others seek turquoise in territorial New Mexico left a treasure trove of letters… this is his story.
    For the first time, discover the adventure in the search for turquoise outside of Cerrillos on the Turquoise Hill.
    “Tiffany Blue” is the true story of territorial New Mexico told through the extensive documents of the immigrant Irishman who was the superintendent of the once biggest and best turquoise mine in all of America.
    Author Patricia McCraw discusses the novel, 7:30 p.m. April 15 at Fuller Lodge.
    The public is welcome to learn about parts played by Indians, outlaws, governors, sheriffs, adventurers, bandits, the New Mexico Insane Asylum, politicians — both good and bad — and an assortment of schemers and dreamers all seeking a piece of the American Turquoise Company. And the backers of the American Turquoise Co. were titans: Charles Lewis Tiffany, the New York jeweler, James Stillman, president of First National City Bank of New York and one of America’s richest men and Allan Pinkerton of the detective agency.