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Today's News

  • LA Big Band to take the stage

    The Los Alamos Summer Concert Series returns to Ashley Pond today with a performance by the Los Alamos Big Band at 7 p.m.
    The show is free of charge and paid for by the sponsors of the Concert Series.
    The Los Alamos Big Band has been a fixture in town since 1945 when the “Pop band” was called the LA All-Stars. In 1984, they became the LA Big Band, an “oldies band.”
    Jan McDonald has been their director since that year. They still play the music of the 1930s and the music of the war years playing swing, two-step, fox trots and waltzes, but it’s OK dancers to do their own thing. LABB also play music from the late 1940s, 1950s and even a little of the 1960s.
    The band plays a lot of music from some of the bandleaders like Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, the Dorsey and the Gershwin brothers, Artie Shaw and the royals, Count Basie and Duke Ellington. They use the same arrangements as those directors and will be play such standards as “String of Pearls,” “I’ll Be Seeing You,” “Take the ‘A’ Train,” “In the Mood,” “It Don’t Mean a Thing (if it ain’t got that swing)” and “One O’Clock Jump.” They have more than 300 danceable, classic songs in their repertoire.

  • Episode 3 of 'Manhattan' discussed

    As the drama continues in WGN’s new series, “Manhattan,” there was another great turnout for the Los Alamos Historical Society’s viewing of the third episode.
    “Manhattan” presents a fictionalized look at life in Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project. Below are some of the common questions that we heard that night and on social media. Every week the Society will be updating a bulletin board in the Museum to continue exploring questions and reactions as the 13-episode series continues.
    Previous episodes are discussed on the website, losalamoshistory.org, on our Facebook page, and in the museum.
    Join the Los Alamos Historical Society Sundays at Time Out Pizzeria in Los Alamos from 8–9:30 p.m. for a viewing and discussion of Manhattan (TV-14 rating).
    Were they swimming in Ashley Pond?
    Most likely Colonel Cox was not swimming at Ashley Pond since the Pond was closed early on during the project due to a fatal accident that occurred. He could be swimming at a pool that was located near Anchor Ranch (today known as S Site).
    Did the Project use polygraphs?

  • Scientists urge rehiring of fired nuke lab worker

    SANTA FE (AP) — A group of scientists who work to limit the spread of nuclear weapons is urging the U.S. Energy Secretary to intervene on behalf of a fired worker at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Santa Fe political scientist James Doyle says he was fired after 17 years on the job in July after writing an article for a nonprofit website in support of abolishing nuclear weapons.
    Doyle worked on the lab’s non-proliferation team.
    Federation of American Scientists President Charles Ferguson urged Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz to ensure that that Doyle isn’t penalized for participating in the national dialogue over nuclear policy. Doyle tells the Santa Fe New Mexican he was fired after lab officials claimed his article raised classification concerns.
    He says the article had been cleared for publication. 

  • Cleanup project begins at upper Truck Route

    Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Corrective Actions Program has begun a legacy-contaminant soil cleanup project at the former Technical Area 61.
    Located on the south side of East Jemez Road adjacent to the county landfill, the project began on Aug. 11 and will last until mid-September.
    Crews will excavate about 120 cubic yards of soil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are common in industrial sites, from a utility corridor where a leaking transformer was staged in the past. The contamination is underground, covered with clean soil, and poses no human health risks.
    “This is yet another step in a larger effort to clean up sites around Los Alamos that are more accessible to the public,” said Corrective Actions Program Director Dave McInroy. “We hope to increase this type of work during the next two years.”
    Crews will use an excavator to remove contaminated soil and replace it with fresh fill. The work will occur behind temporary fencing and is not expected to impact traffic.
    “We look forward to doing this work safely and returning the site in good environmental condition which will not restrict future use,” McInroy said.
     

  • Update 08-22-14

    Car wash

    Los Alamos High School Choir will host a car wash. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday at the American Legion next to McDonald’s. Burgers and hot dogs will be sold for lunch from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. There will also be shaved ice and root beer floats.

    Robotics

    Robotics Night. 5-8 p.m. today at the Bradbury Science Museum. Features robots of all sizes and uses like Bomb Squad and Hazmat robots, sumobots, Legobots and more. For more information visit lanl.gov/museum.

    Concert

    Pianist Nathan Salazar and Santa Fe Opera apprentice artist Benjamin Sieverding in recital. 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Crossroads Bible Church. Tickets $10 adults and $5 children available at the door.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday in council chambers at the Muncipal Building.

    Rotary club

    Noon Tuesday at the Manhattan Project restaurant. Speaker will be Paulette Frankl, author of “Marcel and Me.”
     

  • Meeting scheduled to explain proposed Pajarito temporary pipeline permit

    Española Ranger District will host a public meeting to explain the proposed Pajarito ski area temporary pipeline permit at 6 p.m. Monday at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church, 3900 Trinity Drive. The meeting will be held in Kelly Hall on the Trinity Drive side and of the church.
    Representatives of the Forest Service, Los Alamos County, and Pajarito Recreation Limited Partnership will be available to answer questions raised during the “scoping” period.
    “This proposal is pretty simple in design,” said Sandy Hurlocker, Española District Ranger.
    “But we can tell from the number of questions we’ve received that we need to explain clearly who has authority for which part of this project.”
    The proposal being considered by the Española Ranger District is to permit a temporary pipeline to be located on National Forest in order to pump water from the Los Alamos Reservoir and a Los Alamos County water tank to the privately owned Pajarito Ski Area. The water will be stored at the ski area for snow making in 2014 and potentially for fire-fighting in 2015.
    The District seeks out comments about the project design and implementation during the scoping period, which ends today.

  • Bandelier announces ban on drones

    Bandelier National Monument in northern New Mexico is banning the use of drones.
    Monument officials announced the ban Wednesday, saying incidents involving unmanned aircraft at other national parks around the country prompted the decision. The ban will be in effect until further notice.
    Officials cited instances in which wildlife and visitors seeking quiet and solitude were disturbed by buzzing drones. They also pointed to the recent crash of a drone into Yellowstone’s Grand Prismatic Spring.
    Under the new rule, anyone caught using model airplanes, quadcopters or other types of drones within the monument’s boundaries could face fines up to $5,000 and six months in jail.
    Four other large national parks in the Southwest have already changed their rules to ban drones, including Grand Canyon in Arizona.
    According to a press release from Bandelier, the popularity of UAV’s is rapidly rising, and they are increasingly being seen in National Parks and other protected areas that visitors seek out for quiet and solitude, not for the presence of buzzing drones. Recently, there have been several incidents that have brought this situation to public attention.

  • LA Pony Club rider wins Merit Award

    Los Alamos Pony Club member Erin Kober, 17, won the Charles Owen Technical Merit Award last month in the Cobblestone Farms Horse Trials in Dexter, Michigan.
    Kober, riding her horse Dakota Night, an 18-year-old Morgan/Arab cross (aka Cody), is currently a HB/C3 Traditional rider in the USPC certifications. Kober’s current plans for Pony Club advancement include HA/B Traditional testing within the next two years. She is a senior at Los Alamos High School.
    Kober was in first place at Cobblestone in the Open Training division (jumping 3 feet, 3 inches) after the cross-country phase and finished the show jumping phase with no penalties. She was awarded the Charles Owen Technical Merit Award for safe riding on cross country out of all the Training Level riders.
    “I could not believe I got a 9.5 out of 10 for the gallop on cross country with little Cody — and it was a fantastic way to finish my summer with coach and instructor Dorothy Crowell,” Kober said. “Getting the Technical Merit award for the cross country riding phase was better than any ribbon.”

  • LANL still looking for answers

    Last Friday, the Regional Coalition of LANL Communities received updates on the Feb, 14 radiological release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad. LANL WIPP Recovery Leader and Principal Associate Director For Global Security Terry Wallace and Jeff Kendall, general counsel for the New Mexico Environment Department, provided the updates.
    The event occurred just two weeks after a drum of radioactive waste processed at Los Alamos National Laboratory was placed at WIPP. The breached drum was part of a shipment from the 3,706 campaign to remove 3,706 cubic meters of above ground transuranic waste from lab property.
    The campaign was 93 percent complete when the incident occurred and WIPP shipments were halted.
    Wallace reported that 300 LANL scientists with a range of expertise have performed roughly 3,000 experiments to determine the cause of the breach.
    That work has revealed some answers, but not definitive ones. Experts have determined that the breach in the drum was caused by a series of step-wise exothermic reactions.

  • Church Listings 08-22-14

    Baha’i Faith
    For information, email losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.

    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA, is located at 2390 North Road, 662-5151; see a map at bethluth.com. The Eucharist is celebrated each Sunday at 8:15 a.m. and 11 a.m., with coffee and doughnuts served between services during our Education Hour of classes for all ages. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant, and a well-staffed nursery is provided. All are welcome! Come Join the Family!

    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.

    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. At 10:30 a.m., worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.

    The Christian Church
    92 East Road, 662-6468, lachristian.org. 9-10 a.m. Sunday school; 10-10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service. Rev. Doug Partin, Assoc. Rev. Ben Partin.

    Christian Science
    1725 17th St. 662-5057.