Today's News

  • Time to Ride: New Mexico's ski season begins

    Sipapu Ski and Summer Resort spun its lifts Saturday, Sunday and Monday to once again kick off New Mexico’s ski season. The mountain had its main lift at the base, Lift 1, running to carry skiers up the hill and one route for them to ride down. The mountain is closed for a few days to make more snow and will reopen Friday through Nov. 29. With a few days to make snow and 22 inches dumping on the mountain Monday night, additional terrain is expected to be open Friday.
    The storm hit other New Mexico resorts as well. Pajarito received well over a foot of new snow up top while Taos Ski Valley reported 24 inches in 24 hours Tuesday morning.

  • ’Topper athletes commit to colleges

    In the last week, five athletes from Los Alamos committed to colleges to play sports next year.
    On Tuesday, four of those athletes signed letters of intent at the high school during a ceremony. Sarah Lott signed with the University of Utah to swim for the Utes. Lane Saunders signed with Eastern New Mexico University to play baseball for the Greyhounds. Ashlynn Trujillo signed with New Mexico Highlands University to play basketball. Brianna Montaño also signed with Highlands. Montaño will play volleyball for the Cowgirls.
    Connor Mang, meanwhile, committed to the University of New Mexico’s baseball team last week.
    Lott had several offers from Division I schools, including New Mexico, Kentucky, Cincinnati, Tennessee and others, but decided to compete in the PAC-12 against many of the sports’ powerhouse teams. She got athletic and academic scholarships to the school.
    “Going out there, I loved the school and everyone I got to meet,” Lott said.
    Lott’s main strokes are the 100-yard and 200-yard freestyle. She won state two years ago in the 100 free with a time of 52.07 seconds.

  • Today in history Nov. 16
  • Sun Path grant funds EMS program at UNM-LA

    A $15 million grant is helping University of New Mexico-Los Alamos and 10 other two-year colleges educate a workforce to fulfill the growing demand for healthcare professionals in New Mexico. The grant, awarded in October 2014, is funding equipment, faculty and staff to support the students served in the Emergency Medical Service program that qualifies for funding under the grant.
    Funded by the Department of Labor’s Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training, the grant is going by the acronym SUN PATH. The mission of the New Mexico Skill Up Network is to expand and improve the ability of community colleges in New Mexico to deliver education and career training programs that can be completed in two years or less. SUN aims to prepare program participants to succeed in acquiring the skills, degrees, and credentials needed for high-wage, high-skill employment while also meeting the need of employers in New Mexico. Pathway Acceleration in Technology and Healthcare is about the focus on preparing students for a career in health care by teaching the necessary skills to do the job while strengthening reading, writing, and math abilities.

  • MOWW meeting Tuesday; McDuff to speak

    The November meeting of the Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW) begins at 6 p.m. Tuesday in Los Alamos Research Park, second floor conference room.
    This month’s speaker is Dr. Glen McDuff. McDuff was a professor at Texas Tech University before coming to LASL to work in the weapons program. Since joining LASL in 1979, Glen participated in virtually every major DOE programmatic failure that unfolded during his long and highly questionable tenure at the Laboratory. He is retired from the Laboratory, but continues to serve as a consultant to the Weapons Division and to the Defense Threat Reduction Agency’s Nuclear Weapons School at Kirkland AFB.
    Dinner follows at 6:25 p.m. with presentation at 7:15 p.m. Open to all interested citizens with RSVP by Nov. 15. Hot Rocks Java Cafe will cater dinner of fajitas.
    Cost is $25 per person. Call LTC Gregg Giesler, 662-5574 (email g.giesler@computer.org) or Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750 (email depinyan@cybermesa.com).

  • Births 11-15-15

    Oct. 26 — A boy. Antonio Malaquias Duran. Born to Ashley Botelho and Robert Duran.
    Nov. 3 — A girl. Claire Elaine Wexler. Born to Catherine and Jonathan Wexler.
    Nov. 6 — A boy. Andrew John Work. Born to Sarah and Peter Work.

  • News for Retirees Nov. 15-21

    Nov. 15-21, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    10 a.m.        Senior Civic Discussion Group
    10:30 a.m.        Advisory Council Mtg.
    12:15 p.m.        Smart Driver Course
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Grilled Pork Chop
    1 p.m.        Pinochle
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.         Ballroom Dancing
    8:30 a.m.        Mac Users Group
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    10 a.m.        Computer Users Group
    11:30 a.m.        Green chile ckn tortilla soup
    1 p.m.        Bingo
    1:30 p.m.        Party Bridge

  • Los Alamos: A unique place with incredible views

    Special to the Monitor

  • Pet Talk: Preventing diabetes in cats

    Diabetes mellitus (also called sugar diabetes) is becoming more common in our society. Genetics and lifestyle play an important role in humans; however numerous processes can contribute to the development of this disease. In addition to the rise of human diabetes cases, veterinarians are also seeing an increase in the prevalence of diabetes in cats.
    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by an absolute lack or relative deficiency of insulin. The two most common forms of diabetes in people are Type 1 and Type 2, and most diabetic cats have a form that mimics human Type 2 diabetes. During digestion, nutrients from the cat’s diet are broken down into smaller components—like glucose—that the body can use as energy. Insulin, a hormone responsible for the regulation of glucose in the bloodstream, is produced by the pancreas. Glucose can only enter the cells to be used as energy in the presence of insulin. If there isn’t enough insulin, the body begins to break down fat and protein, leading to increased appetite and weight loss.

  • Animal Shelter 11-15-15

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are micro-chipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out our website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating. You can also check out our Petfinder website for pictures of our adorable adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    Tanker—A very sweet beige-and-white tabby who was found at Los Alamos Fire House 4. Tanker is about a year old, and he does well with both people and cats. Tanker is still young and playful, particularly if catnip is involved! Once he’s done playing, though, this sweet guy loves lounging on your lap, and he would make a great marathon buddy (TV marathon, that is!). Shelter staff and volunteers can’t believe that this sweet guy is still at the shelter.