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Today's News

  • Parra-Vasquez has best prediction

    Nicholas Parra-Vasquez and Ted Romero were the best predictors in Tuesday’s Pace Race. On the three-mile course, Parra-Vasquez was 9 seconds off his prediction while Romero was 16 seconds off his prediction.
    Katie Gattiker was 61 seconds off her prediction.
    In the one-mile race, Martin Pieck was 27 seconds off and Bob Weeks was 29 seconds off his prediction.
    Tuesday’s Pace Race was held on trails to the Estante Overlook and in Potrillo Canyon.
    The fastest runners on the one-mile course were Jason Pieck (8 minutes, 34 seconds) and Sophia Pieck (9:01).
    The fastest runners at the three-mile distance were Romero (21:46) and Laura Woodroffe (27:37).
    Next Tuesday’s Pace Race will start off North Mesa Road, about 100 yards east of the roundabout on the road to the Posse Shack.
    For more information, call 672-1639 or visit atomicrunners.com.

  • Norman wins championship flight

    Los Alamos’ Bruce Norman had the best round of anybody June 17 at the Black Mesa Golf Club in a Northern New Mexico Senior Men’s Golf Association tournament.
    Norman shot a 74-gross score to win the event’s championship flight, beating Santa Fe’s Rob Schneider by a single stroke. They were the only two golfers to shoot in the 70’s on the course.
    His 74 strokes are the best score anyone from Los Alamos has shot this year on the NNMSMGA tour.
    Norman also landed closest to the pin on the 15th hole.
    Locals also did well at Buffalo Thunder’s Towa Golf Club June 16 in another NNMSMGA tournament.
    Phil Gursky shot an 85-gross score to finish second in the first flight.
    Fred Thomas won the second flight with a 91-gross score.
    Los Alamos residents also landed closest to the pin on three of the four holes contested.
    Kerry Coffelt landed closest on Valley-nine’s second hole, Jim Steedle landed closest on the Valley’s seventh hole while Quinn Cremer had the best drive on the Boulder’s ninth hole.
     

  • Isotopes fall behind early in loss

    The Albuquerque Isotopes (31-41) surrendered seven runs in the first two innings and couldn’t climb out the whole Tuesday night at Southwest University Park as the El Paso Chihuahuas (36-35) took an 8-5 victory in the opening game of a three-game series.

    It took the Chihuahuas just two batters to score their first run of the game and only eight batters to score their first four runs in the opening frame. Abraham Almonte scored on a sacrifice fly after a leadoff triple, and Cody Decker added a two-RBI double. El Paso’s fourth run of the first inning came off a Rocky Gale RBI single.

    After the Isotopes scored a pair of runs in the second, the Chihuahuas expanded their lead back to 7-2 in the home half of the inning. Albuquerque managed to chip away with a single run in the third and two more in the sixth but could never erase the early deficit.

  • Evening Performances

    The audience at Ashley Pond was entertained by the Olions, the acting club at Los Alamos High School, and by a group of performers that did tricks on unicycle and acrobatics.

  • Update 6-24-15

    Splash n Dash

    The first Splash n Dash event of the season will be today at the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center. The Splash ‘n’ Dash is a non-competitive training event primarily for those planning on taking part in the August Los Alamos Triathlon. Registration will be at 6:30 p.m. Only a limited number of participants are allowed.

    Planning council

    The Los Alamos County DWI Planning Council will meet Thursday morning in room 110 of the municipal building. Meeting time is 8:30 a.m.

    Farmers Market

    Los Alamos County Councilors will have a booth at the Los Alamos Farmers Market Thursday. The booth will be open from 9-11 a.m. The market is located in the Mesa Public Library parking lot. The market is open from 7-12:30 p.m.

    Movie

    Los Alamos County will host a Movie in the Park Wednesday evening. The movie will be “Mal-eficent” and it will be screened at Urban Park. Movies in the Park are free and begin at sunset.

    Opera

    A pair of apprentice singers from the 2015 Santa Fe Opera will perform in the United Church Sunday. The performance will be at 3 p.m. Tickets are free for Opera Guild members, $10 for non-guild members.

    Summer concert

  • Jindal says he's running

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal of Louisiana said Wednesday he was entering the 2016 presidential race and he began trying to distinguish himself in a field packed with better known rivals.
    It’s a long shot effort for an accomplished but overshadowed governor, and his prospects will depend in large measure on his continued courtship of evangelical voters. But several other contenders also are determined to win over that group.
    “My name is Bobby Jindal, and I am running for president of the United States of America,” he posted on his website. Short video clips showed Jindal and his wife, Supriya, talking to their three children about the campaign to come.
    “Mommy and daddy have been thinking and talking a lot about this, and we have decided we are going to be running for president,” he tells them.
    The 44-year-old two-term governor planned a kickoff rally later Wednesday.
    Aides discussed Jindal’s plans to focus on social conservatives, as he has done for months in extensive travels, and highlight his reputation as a policy-seasoned leader.

  • Hruby promoted to head Sandia

    ALBUQUERQUE — Last week, Jill M. Hruby was named the next president and director of Sandia National Laboratories, the country’s largest national lab.
    Hruby will be the first woman to lead a national security laboratory when she steps into her new role July 17.
    A Sandia staff member and manager for the past 32 years, Hruby most recently served as a vice president overseeing Sandia efforts in nuclear, biological and chemical security, homeland security, counterterrorism and energy security.
    Hruby will be the first woman to lead any of the three national security labs — Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore— under the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).
    She succeeds Paul Hommert, who is retiring July 16 after serving as Sandia president and laboratories director since 2010.
    Hruby’s appointment was announced to the Sandia workforce by Rick Ambrose, who chairs the board of directors for Sandia Corp. and is the executive vice president of Lockheed Martin Space Systems.

  • Unemployment is at 3.8 percent in county

    Unemployment ticked up slightly in Los Alamos County in the month of May, that according to New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions.
    Los Alamos had an additional 26 persons reporting as unemployed in May as opposed to April. In all, a total of 308 people were unemployed.
    Despite the uptick, the county still had the lowest unemployment rate among the state’s counties. Los Alamos reported a 3.8 percent unemployment rate for 8,167 job seekers, a number that was down from April’s adjusted number of 8,209.
    Los Alamos’ rate of unemployment is similar to that of a year ago, when a 3.9 percent unemployment was reported.
    The current rate is still well below the seasonally-adjusted rate for the state of 6.2 percent. That number held steady between April and May.
    Across the state, most numbers stayed steady. Albuquerque’s numbers remain strong, as do many of the metro areas in New Mexico.
    Workforce Solutions reported about 2,400 nonfarm jobs had been added last month, most of those in the service industry. Construction across New Mexico also added roughly 1,100 jobs.

  • Woman ordered to join program

    Kelly Casados, a Los Alamos resident who was arrested in February for her role in a drug deal, was sentenced in First Judicial District Court recently.
    In February, Casados was one of several suspects arrested during the police department’s “Operation Genesis,” an operation meant to cut down the level of illegal drug trafficking in Los Alamos.
    The operation also netted numerous other subjects, including Sarah Orr, Ronald Snow, Raymond Martinez, Nicholas Hagermann, Joe Anthony Martinez, Christopher Sandy and Brendon Brown.
    Casados accepted a plea deal for her involvement after being caught by police on surveillance video in December of last year being an accessory to a drug deal with Joe Martinez and Casados’ husband, Ronald Snow.
    The police used a confidential informant to buy drugs from Snow and Martinez. The informant was wired with a camera and a microphone to record the transaction.
    Casados was arrested on two counts of conspiracy with trafficking in controlled substances (distribution). Martinez and Snow were arrested for trafficking in controlled substances.
    According court records, the drugs involved were various amounts of methamphetamine.

  • Johnson gets nod to join BPU

    On Tuesday, the Los Alamos County Council appointed Jeff Johnson to the Board of Public Utilities, following a new process for interviewing the candidates.
    In the past, council made their appointment decisions based on the candidates’ applications and a recommendation from the interviewing committee, as they do for other board appointments. The revised process was formulated by a newly formed subcommittee comprised of council and BPU members.
    The goal is to allow council to make a more informed decision about appointees to the board, which oversees a large portion if the county revenues and all aspects of the county’s utilities.
    Four citizens applied for the chance to replace Timothy Neal, whose term expires the end of this month.
    The other candidates were Kerry Harms, James Nealy Robinson and David Schiferl.
    Each candidate was allowed to make an opening statement about their qualifications and why they wished to serve.
    Johnson — who also had the recommendation of the BPU selection committee — is an engineer and project manager for Los Alamos National Laboratory who manages the development of equipment and facilities to be used in nuclear applications. He has resided in Los Alamos for 25 years.