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Today's News

  • Flipping to the Music

    The crowd was lively for Ryan Shupe and his band last week at Ashley Pond. Tonight, one of the most popular bands in Los Alamos, the Red Elvises, are playing at Ashley Pond as part of the Relay for Life. Concert time is 7 p.m.

  • Local briefs 8-21-15

    One-day open house planned at local church

    On Sunday, the United Church will have a community Open House from 3-5 p.m. to invite people to come see the result of the capital improvements over the last four years.
    The Thrift Shop will be open at that time as well. 662-2971. The church is located at 2525 Canyon Road.
    For more information, call 662-2971, or visit unitedchurchla.org.

    Space available for White Rock Artist Market

    The White Rock Artist Market currently has space is available for its two remaining outdoor Artist Markets, Labor Day weekend and the final market for the season Balloon Fiesta on Oct. 3.  Local artists and artisans are encouraged to sell at the market. On average 400-600 visitors go through the White Rock Visitor Center each day in conjunction with the shuttle going to and from Bandelier National Monument.
    The White Rock Artist Market is from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., the first Saturday of every month May through October.  The fee to participate is $25 per market. For more information contact Melanie Peña at 661-4836 or email melanie@losalamos.org. To register for either of the remaining markets visit,  eventbrite.com/white-rock-artist-market-registration.

    Roasted organic green chile at co-op

  • Assets in Action: Words of wisdom from an empty nest

    Well, we are officially back to school. This year more than any other, I understand why we start on a Thursday, because by Friday, both young and old were just plain exhausted. It is a nice ease back into the routine.
    Now that the public schools are underway, it will soon be time for families to send their college students back or off for the first time.
    I always feel it is my moral obligation to publically praise University of New Mexico-Los Alamos, the “Community College Feel with the University Appeal.” The number of kids who stayed local might surprise you.
    After a year at UNM-LA, the Lauritzen family has sent our 2014 Los Alamos High School graduate off to main campus and a new home away from home.
    I confess, I wept like a baby! That’s right, you would have thought he was flying to the other side of the world, but he’s no longer at home and only in Albuquerque. I felt bad that he had to endure it, but he knew it was coming the day after he walked that ’Topper stage.
    It was kind of hard for me to grasp why such emotion at even the thought of it, when he’s only an hour and a half away.

  • Be There calendar 8-21-15

    Recurring meetings
    Note: If any of the following listings need to be changed or removed, contact Gina Velasquez immediately at lacommunity@lamonitor.com, or 662-4185, ext. 21.

    The Atomic City Corvette Club meets at 6 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at Time Out Pizza in White Rock. For more information, contact Chris Ortega at 672-9789.

    The Los Alamos Table Tennis Club meets from 7:30-10 p.m. Tuesdays; and from 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays, at the Betty Ehart Senior Center, lower level. On Tuesday, there is a fee of $2 per player. There is no charge on Saturday. For more information, contact Avadh Saxena at AVADH—S@hotmail.com or Ed Stein at 662-7472.

    The Lions Club meets at 84 Barcelona in White Rock on the first and third Thursdays. For more information, call 672-3300 or 672-9563.

    The Rotary Club of Los Alamos meets at noon every Tuesday at the golf course, 4250 Diamond Dr. Guest speakers every week.  

    Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos meets Tuesdays from Noon-1 p.m. at Trinity on the Hill Church in Kelly Hall.  

  • Church listings 8-21-15

    Baha’i Faith
    For information, email losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.
    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA, is located at 2390 North Road, 662-5151; see a map at bethluth.com. The Eucharist is celebrated each Sunday at 9 a.m. with coffee and doughnuts served during fellowship hour starting at 10:15 a.m. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant, and a well-staffed nursery is provided. All are welcome! Come Join the Family!
    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.
    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. and worship at 10:30.  Our current series is “Kingdom Reign” as we study the book of 2 Samuel.
    The Christian Church
    92 East Road, 662-6468, lachristian.org. 9-10 a.m. Sunday school; 10-10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service. Rev. Doug Partin, Assoc. Rev. Ben Partin.
    Christian Science
    1725 17th St. 662-5057.
    Church of Christ

  • Mormon women named to councils previously only reserved for men

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Mormon church for the first time has appointed women to three high-level church councils previously reserved only for men — a move scholars and Latter-day Saint feminists say marks a small, but noteworthy step in an ongoing push to increase visibility and prominence of women in the faith.
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced the appointments Tuesday of three high-ranking women to committees that make key policy decisions for a faith of 15 million worldwide members.
    The women are Linda K. Burton, president of the faith’s largest organization for women called the Relief Society; Rosemary Wixom, president a branch dedicated to teaching children called General Primary and Bonnie L. Oscarson, who leads the Young Women’s organization.
    Mormon leader Dallin H. Oaks, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, said in a statement that he is pleased the councils will have the women’s wisdom and participation.
    Jan Shipps, a retired religion professor from Indiana who is a non-Mormon expert on the church, called it an important change that was likely a response to pressure being applied in recent years by feminist Mormons.
    “It’s a way of saying women are important, but we are not going to make women members of the priesthood,” Shipps said.

  • The Planned Parenthood horror show, it’s not a movie

    Babies are being born alive, only to be butchered for their parts, harvesting tiny hearts, brains and livers.
    Fetal organs are being transplanted into lab rats for research. Horror shows are usually like that: repulsive, disturbing, barbaric and sickening.
    Except that Planned Parenthood’s horror show is not a movie, but a real nightmare that keeps getting worse.
    No one is above the law. The trafficking and sale of aborted baby body parts for profit is illegal and unethical.
    In fact, it is a federal felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $500,000 (42 U.S.C. 289g-2). If this had been any other medical facility or hospital, there would be unquestioned support for immediate investigation.
    Claims of innocence do not suffice.
    Hillary Clinton admitted the videos “are disturbing” and went on to say, “this raises not questions about Planned Parenthood so much as it raises questions about the whole process, that is, not just involving Planned Parenthood, but many institutions in our country.”
    Clinton added that if there’s going to be a congressional inquiry into the videos, “it should look at everything,” and not just one organization.

  • Search for home health care just got easier

    Medicare has just begun publishing star ratings for home health care agencies to help consumers tell the good providers from the bad.
    Medicare pays for health care you receive in the comfort and privacy of your home if you meet certain requirements. You must be homebound, under a physician’s care and in need of part-time, skilled nursing care, or rehabilitative services.
    One in 10 people with traditional Medicare relies on home health services in a given year. A third of all home visits are for patients released from the hospital but still requiring attention. The other two-thirds are for people trying to stay out of the hospital in the first place.
    Medicare’s website — medicare.gov — is a convenient place to begin your search for a home health agency. With a few clicks, you can compare the providers in your area, check on the types of services they offer and the quality of their care.
    To help you understand the differences in quality between agencies, Medicare has added star ratings to its website. One star means “poor,” two stars are “below average,” three stars mean “average,” four stars are “above average” and five stars mean “excellent.”

  • Hillary’s energy plan is like Obama’s Clean Power Plan on steroids

    The Hillary Clinton campaign’s newly announced “ambitious renewable energy plans” move far beyond Barack Obama’s highly criticized efforts that have increased costs and jeopardized reliability.
    Obama’s policies push a goal of producing 20 percent of the nation’s electricity from renewables by 2030 — hers is 33 percent by 2027. We are at 7 percent today.
    At a rally in Ames, Iowa, Clinton said, “I want more wind, more solar, more advanced biofuels, more energy efficiency. And, I’ve got to tell you, people who argue against this are just not paying attention.”
    I’ve got to tell you, the Clinton campaign isn’t paying attention — or, it is paying attention to the demands of wealthy campaign donors.
    The White House has received aggressive push back and a Supreme Court’s smack down over the administration’s policies designed to cut carbon dioxide by requiring renewables.
    A growing list of governors refuses to comply with Obama’s Clean Power Plan (CPP) — the cornerstone of his climate agenda — and Congress has pending legislation giving the governors the authority to “just say no” if such plans would negatively affect electricity rates, reliability, or important economic sectors.

  • Short changed at primary

    Few, if any, New Mexicans seem to notice, let alone mind, that their lawmakers schedule the state’s presidential primaries so late as to seriously limit their choice of presidential candidates.
    Yet it happens every four years.
    Think upon it. By June 7 of next year, when New Mexico holds its 2016 primary elections where Republican and Democratic voters can vote for the candidate they wish to be their parties’ standard bearers at the November general election, that decision will already have been made by voters in 40 other states.
    By then some candidates currently presumed to be in it for the long haul will have dropped out of the race altogether.
    There are (at present count) fully 17 individuals who have declared their candidacy for the Republican nomination, far more than necessary, even most Republicans would surely agree.
    Yet such are the vagaries of presidential politics that just last week one of the most recognizable of those candidates, former-Texas Gov. Rick Perry, made it known that for want of sufficient “liquidity” in his campaign treasury staffers at his headquarters will go unpaid for the time being.