.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • LA post office clerk can help send holiday packages with a smile

    If Los Alamos Post Office customers looking to ship holiday gifts are lucky, they may get post office clerk Ted Romero to help them out. For the past 20 years, Romero has been using his smile and his wits to help customers through one of the most stressful times of the year.

    Not only is Romero good at solving problems, he can also tell a great joke.

    Romero said he likes to joke with the customers because it helps take their minds off their worries, especially if the wait may be a little longer than expected.

    “Life is tense enough as it is,” Romero said.

    It also makes good economic sense.

    “If people get the service they want, they will keep coming back. There is more than one shipping option,” Romero said. “We like people to be happy.”

    Romero also is a resident of Los Alamos County, which sometimes leads to some strange interactions outside of work.

    “Some of my older customers sometime say ‘I know you from somewhere,’ and I’ll go, ‘Oh yeah, I met you at your niece’s bar mitzvah…” Romero joked.

    It’s then, though, they catch on to where they really met him, and everyone’s in on the joke.

  • Quilts, yarn make for a warm family Christmas

    The holidays are all about family, and no two businesses in Los Alamos County speaks to family more than Warm Hearts Yarn and Atomic City Quilts.

    With its walls and floor space stacked with crafting, heirloom, scrap booking and quilt supplies, it’s easy to see why. The two businesses have everything one needs to make that special gift or create the next quality family keepsake.

    The stores also sell bead jewelry and regular jewelry. The store also sells soaps, candles and lotion from local vendor Heather Quinn, with many of the items making perfect stocking stuffers.

    Atomic Quilts and Warm Hearts also has gift certificates available.

    About two years ago, Atomic Quilts move in and the two businesses set up shop together in the same space at 1247 Central Avenue, Suite C.

    On Small Business Saturday, the stores will be open from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., but since the day is a special one for Los Alamos, Atomic Quilts owner Shelly Kuropatwinski said they may keep the doors open later for those last-minute shoppers.

    Warm Hearts Yarn first moved into the shop from their White Rock location in September 2015 and Atomic City Quilts started fresh at the new location.

    Kuropatwinski got into quilting 17 years ago simply because her baby needed a quilt.

  • FBI: Customer fired at LANB bank robber

    The FBI confirmed Wednesday that a bank customer shot at a suspected bank robber on Tuesday outside the Los Alamos National Bank branch in White Rock.

    Further information regarding the customer wasn’t made available.

    Several witnesses reported hearing shots a bit before noon on Tuesday. An armed man dressed in all black, with his face covered, reportedly held up the bank and received an undisclosed amount of money.

    Herman Manzanares, owner of Herman’s Auto next door to the bank in White Rock, said he and his employees heard the shots.

    “We saw the guy run around to Rover and we saw the man who shot at him go back into the bank. We called 911 and so did the bank,” Manzanares said.

    A few minutes later police arrived; traffic snarled as heavily armed police sought the suspect.

    The small town – a bedroom community for nearby Los Alamos – shut down with residents asked to stay inside and school children locked inside their schools.

    “It was just chaos,” Manzanares said.

    Also Wednesday, the Los Alamos Police Department announced they are asking anyone in White Rock who may have any video or image surveillance – from anywhere in town – to contact them immediately.

  • Middle school wrestling team wins in Rio Rancho

    The Los Alamos Hawks Middle School wrestling team went to Rio Rancho this past weekend to the Rio Rancho Middle School Dual Tournament. They came back to Los Alamos with first place and a consolation victory. Los Alamos brought two teams to Rio Rancho, Los Alamos Blue and Los Alamos Silver.

    The Blue earned first place while the Silver team came out with the consolation.

    They defeated Bernallio, Cleveland, Milagro and Rio Rancho to take first place at the tournament.  

    The blue team defeated Bernalillo in the first match by a convincing score of 102-6. Next up was Cleveland.

    The Hawks took Cleveland out by a score of 84-29. In the last match of pool play, the Hawks defeated Milagro by a score of 84-24.

    In the final against Rio Rancho, Los Alamos Blue had an intense battle with Rio Rancho, but they prevailed to win the tournament, 57-49.
     

  • LAHS football gathers to celebrate successful season

    After completing its first winning season in five years, the Los Alamos High School football team gathered at Crossroads Bible Church last Friday evening to celebrate the past, and look ahead to the future.

    More than 200 people filled the church to capacity, with head coach Garett Williams, saying, “This is the biggest banquet we have ever done, and it is great to see the LA football family continue to grow.”

    The banquet began with a highlight film from the varsity games throughout the season, including all of the key plays from the team’s dramatic wins over Santa Fe High School and Española Valley High School.

    After the 14 minute video package, Williams said, “The original version of that was more than 35 minutes long. We had so many big plays this year, and it was hard to narrow it down.”

    Following the video, the team began to hand out a number of team, and All-District, awards.

    The two big winners from the varsity team were Jack Stewart and Arturo Rodriguez, both of whom took home multiple awards. Stewart was awarded Academic All-District, First Team All-District as both a running back, and as a linebacker and was named the team’s offensive Most Valuable Player.

    During the season, Stewart ran for nearly 900 yards and caught passes for nearly 200 more.

  • So-called monuments review was much ado about much ado

    The dreaded national monument review stirred up the dust and is now disappearing.
    In April the administration called for a review of 27 national monuments, including two in New Mexico and two nearby in Utah, to examine “another egregious use of federal power,” as the president put it. After many protests and photos of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke on horseback, what’s happened is: Not much.
    The blowback was hotter than Zinke and the administration anticipated; public comments, overwhelmingly in support, topped 2.3 million. New Mexicans submitted the largest number of comments per capita (97,000). Supporters went all out to demonstrate that these monuments weren’t just an environmental fantasy – they were created after long study and public hearings, and all but Utah’s monuments enjoyed broad public support.
    From the beginning, it was obvious that the main target was the 1.35 million-acre Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah, established by President Obama at the end of his term. The two buttes that give Bear’s Ears its name lie just north of the Navajo Reservation.

  • If sanctuary school, then kiss $8 million goodbye!

    BY LISA SHIN
    Guest Editorial

    On August 29, 2017, our County Council unanimously passed a proclamation honoring the contributions of immigrants. Compared to the earlier version in April, specific language was removed, its tone was softened, and a more strident “resolution” was changed to a “proclamation,” which did not require a vote. Although Councilor O’Leary called it a “milquetoast,” “weak half measure of timid support,” Councilor Maggiore recognized “that the original was a little inflammatory, a little reactionary to what just transpired on the national scene...” “We’re not actually trying to create new laws or turn the county into a sanctuary county,” because we would be “fools to do that.” Councilor Sheehey, remarked “I see this as a statement of values. I have no intention of trying to push our county into some kind of a legal battle about sanctuary cities.”

  • Part-time jobs open at Aspen Ridge

    Locals looking for part-time employment on “the Hill,” may want to investigate another job title, “care assistant.”

    Under a pilot program at Aspen Ridge Assisted Living, potential employees will have an opportunity to work part-time, said Los Alamos Retirement Community Liaison Cynthia Goldblatt.

    The part-time positions provide flexibility, which is what at-home parents, retirees, and college students may be looking for, Goldblatt said.

    Applicants need to pass a background check, and would receive training to work beside people who are elderly.

    They assist at mealtimes, during activities and during other aspects of the person’s day. Residents participate in a variety of activities, including exercise, movie nights and supervised visits by therapeutic animals.

    The part-time aspect of the pilot project would allow people with other responsibilities to add to their income and develop new skills, as well as helping people in their community. In some cases, the potential employees have elderly relatives elsewhere; working at Aspen Ridge would provide a way to give back to their community.

    Goldblatt said anyone interested in the part-time positions should contact her at (505) 695-8981.

  • Tribal leaders take aim at oil and gas development

    BERNALILLO (AP) — Native American activists and tribal leaders from around New Mexico are joining the chorus of environmentalists who have been fighting for years to stop oil and gas development.

    This time, opponents are spurred by a proposed ordinance that would regulate drilling in one sparsely populated county.

    They are part of a groundswell as tribes across the U.S. organize around land issues, from a pipeline in North Dakota and the disputed boundaries of a national monument in Utah to concerns about the encroachment of energy development in an area of the Southwest dotted with archaeological sites tied to a civilization that gave rise to many of the region’s modern tribes.

    At a contentious meeting late last week, Ahjani Yepa of Jemez Pueblo spoke about the connection between her people and the land, spurring fellow activists in the crowd to raise their fists in solidarity.

    “As with many cultures and religions, we do not have a book to guide us. The land is our Bible. Once it is gone, you cannot print another copy,” she told members of the Sandoval County Commission.

  • LAPS, county discuss property transfer for new gym

    Space for basketball, volleyball and indoor soccer for all ages is at a premium in Los Alamos.

    However, the space crunch may get some relief following approval of a proposed transfer of land from the Los Alamos Public Schools district to the county.

    The proposed transfer – which must be approved by the state Board of Finance – was adopted by the school board last week.

    County Manager Harry Burgess said on Monday that the prospect of a new gymnasium close to the district’s middle school has been the subject of preliminary discussions between county officials and representatives of the school district.

    “We haven’t taken any action – any discussion would just be speculative,” Burgess said.

    However, the school board approved the proposal last week in order to get the matter on the Board of Finance’s next meeting agenda. The deadline for agenda items is Nov, 28 for the Board of Finance’s meeting scheduled for Dec. 19.

    The briskness could be attributable to the upcoming legislative session, where the county, if its council gives the go-ahead, may be able to ask for additional funds to build the gymnasium, Burgess said.