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Today's News

  • No politics with utilities, please

    The advocates of Charter Amendment 2 are now claiming that it is preventive maintenance for the Utilities Department. This type of maintenance is based on the principle: “If it ain’t broke, fix it ‘til it is.”
    Don’t let them politicize our utilities. Vote “No” on Charter Amendment 2.
    Gil Miranda
    Los Alamos

  • A case for voting for Amendment 2

    I am voting for Amendment No. 2 on the upcoming ballot about our Utilities Board. 
    Contrary to the opponent’s dire depictions, it does not give unchecked power to council, or radically change the government structure established in the 1960s.   
    It does, however, put in some fail-safes and backstops that I think most of us would actually assume are in place now.
    Our local government has two parts. One is the Department of Public Utilities, which provides water, sewer, gas and electric. It is managed by a utility manager, policy decisions are set by a citizen utility board, and neither the board nor the manager reports to council. 
    The second is the county government, providing police, fire protection, libraries, parks, and the jail, for instance. These are managed by a county administrator, policies are set by the county council and you elect the council.
    With Amendment No. 2, the changes:
    • Require the utility board to abide by the Sunshine Laws of New Mexico — to announce all meetings and agendas.
    • Require the board to report once a quarter to the community — in a report to council — any issues that might be of concern.
    • Require the board, once every five years, to hire an outside utility consultant to review their processes.

  • Animal Shelter 10-19-14

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    Dantez — A young, neutered, male gray and white cat who lost his left eye in an accident at the shelter. He gets around just fine and is accepting gentle visitors. He loves to be petted and he enjoys his best friend Jay.
    Hobbes — A 5-month-old, neutered, male, tabby kitten who will be available for adoption after his immunizations on Oct. 16. He is very friendly and playful.

  • News For Retirees 10-19-14

    Oct. 19-25, 2014
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m. Cardio
    10:30 a.m. Feldenkreis class
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Pork Chop
    1 p.m. Matter of Balance class
    7 p.m. Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:30 a.m. Mac users group
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    10 a.m. Computer users group
    11:30 Lunch: Green chile chicken tortellini soup
    Noon Lunch talk: Jonathan Ice, Commission for the Blind
    1 p.m. Bingo
    1 p.m. MindBody massage
    6 p.m. Mahjong
    7 p.m. Bridge
    7:30 p.m. Table tennis

    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m. LAVA quilters
    8:45 a.m. Cardio plus exercise
    10:45 a.m. Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Catfish
    1:30 p.m. Daytime duplicate bridge

    THURSDAY
    8:30 a.m. Walk-In-The-Woods
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Salisbury steak
    1:30 p.m. Beginning tap dancing
    2 p.m. Ballroom dancing
    6:30 p.m. Chess
    7 p.m. Bridge

  • Garcia Richard tops Rodgers in District 43 fundraising

    Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard (D-District 43, Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Sandoval and Rio Arriba) is topping Republican challenger Geoff Rodgers’ fundraising efforts by almost a three-to-one margin.
    Garcia Richard’s cumulative contributions total $162,127 since the start of the primaries, with her expenditures at $111,240.04.
    Rodgers has brought in $55,765.52 and spent $33,113.61.
    Both candidates have received contributions from their respective parties as well as party PACs (Political Action Committees).
    Other New Mexico Democratic campaigns have donated $22,401 to Garcia Richard, as well as in kind contributions valued at $5,835. Democratic PACs, such as the Ken Martinez Leadership Fund and Sen. Tom Udall’s Southwest Leadership Fund, have given another $11,400.
    In contrast, Rodgers has received just $7,345 from state GOP committees and an additional $3,500 from Republican PACs such as GOPAC and SFFRW (Santa Fe Federated Republican Women).
    The candidates’ other major donors show a sharp contrast.
    Garcia Richard is receiving union support, with contributions ranging from $50 from IATSE Local 423 (International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees) to $2,400 from AFSCME (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) and $2,600 from the American Federation of Teachers COPE.

  • Longtime museum volunteers retire

    The volunteers, staff and board members of the Los Alamos Historical Society bid farewell Wednesday to two of the Historical Museum’s longest serving volunteers, Ann Beyer and Ruth Sherman.
    “Ann and Ruth have been true stalwarts,” said Kathy Ankeny, Museum Shop manager for the Historical Society. “We are going to miss them, and our visitors won’t have quite the same experiences without these two ladies sharing their vast knowledge and wonderful storytelling.”
    Beyer has worked with the museum nearly 23 years, volunteering after her retirement from Los Alamos National Laboratory as a research librarian. “I have a closet history major, and my uncle was president of the Wisconsin Historical Society. With my experience as a librarian, I felt I could answer visitors’ questions,” she said.
    Sherman, a retired chemist, began volunteering nearly 12 years after she was turned down for the job of museum shop manager. “I didn’t get it, but I went ahead and volunteered. It turned out to be a good thing. I found I really enjoyed it,” she said.
    Both Sherman and Beyer say their favorite part of the job was meeting the people coming into the museum. In the last year, more than 35,000 visitors from 41 countries and every state in the union visited the Historical Museum.

  • Officials: Stay vigilant, aware about Ebola virus, but don’t panic

    Unfortunately, living high atop a mesa doesn’t isolate Los Alamos from the current Ebola virus crisis, especially when the town you live in is home to a national laboratory, with people coming and going from all regions of the country and from all over the world 24 hours a day.
    However, don’t go shopping for a hazmat suit and a barbed wire fence just yet.
    Health and safety experts in Los Alamos, as well as the state say people should be vigilant and aware, but don’t go into panic mode. The odds are more in favor of you getting this season’s flu than Ebola.
    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a federal agency tasked with monitoring and preventing outbreaks of deadly diseases on the domestic front, as well as the international front, there are specific preconditions involved in spreading the disease. The first victim in the infection chain has to come in contact with an infected animal. From human to human, a person has to come in direct contact with bodily fluids from another human to become infected. Bodily fluids include blood, semen, mucus, sweat, feces, vomit and breast milk.

  • Higdon earns top state teaching honor

    Lynne Higdon, the physical education teacher from Barranca Elementary School, was named the 2014 New Mexico Elementary Physical Education Teacher of the Year. The announcement was recently made at the State P.E. Conference at Albuquerque.
     Higdon has served as the P.E. teacher at Barranca for the past 10 years. Higdon is well respected for her comprehensive physical education program that introduces students to a wide array of activities. She is also credited for extending physical activities by hosting community events such as an outside games day for families, family hikes in the Jemez and a family golf outing.
    Among writing supportive letters for Higdon’s nomination for the award was Pam Miller, director of curriculum and instruction, who described Higdon as a “conscientious individual who works hard to make sure that students complete every task to the best of their ability.”
     Miller wrote, “Ms. Higdon uses her enthusiasm and experience to ignite students’ eagerness to participate in class.”

  • Update 10-19-14

    Trail Sale

    The Annual Jemez Trail Sale. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. today along N.M. 4. Take a four-mile detour at Mile Marker 27 and just follow the signs.

    Library event

    Authors Speak Series presents a special reading of young adult fiction. “The Night of Pan,” by Gail Strickland. 3:30 p.m. Monday at the Mesa Public Library upstairs rotunda.

    High Tea

    High Tea on the Hill. 1-2:30 p.m. today at the Los Alamos High School lobby. $20 per person. RSVP preferred but not required. Call 662-0800.

    Lunch With a Leader

    The League of Women Voters will have the monthly meeting at 11:45 a.m. Oct. 21 at Mesa Public Library. Lunch will be available from the LA Co-op Market for $10. To order lunch, call Karyl Ann Armbruster at 661-6605, or at kaskacayman@gmail.com. Lunch does not have to be ordered to attend the meeting. Lunch orders are due today.

    Performance

  • Gov directs DOH to direct Ebola plan

     Governor Susana Martinez has directed the New Mexico Department of Health (DOH) to coordinate the state’s Ebola preparedness plan to be ready in the unlikely event there is an Ebola case diagnosed in New Mexico. DOH will coordinate the state’s Ebola preparedness plan between state agencies like the Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (DHSEM), as well as local governments, hospitals, and healthcare providers throughout the state to ensure New Mexico is ready to handle any potential cases of Ebola.
    “The risk of New Mexicans contracting Ebola is very, very low, but I want to assure everyone that we are taking the necessary steps to prepare for the unlikely event of cases in New Mexico,” said Martinez. “The Department of Health and the Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management are monitoring developments very closely, and our Emergency Operation Center can be activated within minutes, if necessary.”