.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Community Calendar 5-11-16

    TODAY
    Green Hour Hike at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join other families for a kid-centered hike. Free.

    Members of the Laboratory Retiree Group (LRG) Annual Meeting from 4-7 p.m. at the Hot Rocks Java Cafe, 4200 West Jemez Road. Contact sgirard@losalamos.com for more information.

    Hiking 101 from 6:30-8 p.m. at Nature Center. Discover how to confidently and comfortably hike our trails with expert Craig Martin and Land of Enchantment Wildlife Foundation. Cost is $15 for non-members and $12 for PEEC members.
    THURSDAY
    The Los Alamos Genealogical Association will meet at 7 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library in Los Alamos. Eowyn Langholf from Albuquerque will speak about “A Gentle Introduction to Social Media and Genealogy.” The traditional no-host dinner will be at 5:30 p.m. at China Moon before the meeting.

    Nature Yoga at 6:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga at the nature center with Christa Tyson, where you have a great view of nature. Cost is $15 for non-member and $12 for PEEC members. More information at peecnature.org.
    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

  • Assets in Action: Parents of seniors: treasure this time

    This week, a reminder to the parents of seniors, the next few weeks is about to travel at warp speed.
    Try to stop down during the next several weeks and take it all in slowly. Sure I know, there are a hundred things to do, last performances, awards ceremonies and senior activities, but slowly apply the brakes when you can do it without stopping down.
    OK, I even encourage stopping down. When practice and games and homework all step in and take over, reign in a day or two during the week the reconvene a meal at the dinner table.
    On a weekend morning, make some pancakes, bake some cinnamon rolls or swing by the store early for some fancy doughnuts. You can break out the chocolate milk, spring for some of those take and go Starbucks drinks or make some hot chocolate.
    Open the house to friends during this time, stock up on snacks, movies or games and then sit in an adjoining room and relish the chatter and commentary. We may even forgo the traditional graduation party for an all-out friend event with a new PlayStation game, some Redbox movies and final gathering of their friends.

  • Scouts to host food drive Saturday

    Local Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, and Venture Scouts are prepared to help the Letter Carriers and LA Cares to collect, sort and store food donations and supplies during the 24th annual National Food Drive sponsored by the Letter Carriers on Saturday.
    It may be surprising to learn that even in Los Alamos, there are dozens of families, many with young children or elderly, who need help, in addition to those in neighboring communities.
    To help, the scouts ask residents to fill a grocery bag (double it for strength) or a box with non-perishable food and other necessities. Then, on Saturday morning, place it near their mailboxes and letter carrier, a Boy Scout or an adult leader will pick it up and take it to be sorted, stored and distributed by LA Cares.    
    Here are suggestions for donations:
     Macaroni and cheese, 100 percent juices in half-gallon plastic, canned fruits and vegetables, boxed  mashed potatoes, low-fat/salt canned meats. No glass containers.

  • Ingenious donation box arrives at PEEC

    Gordon McDonough, well known artist and educator at the Bradbury Science Museum, offered to create a donation box for the new Los Alamos County Nature Center, and it has now arrived, ready to enchant all donors.
    When visitors slide your dollar bill into the slot, a light flashes to check that it’s a bill, not a piece of paper. Then the fun begins. An acorn woodpecker may tap on a tree, an Abert’s squirrel may swish his tail, a bobcat may stick his head up, or a pika may pop out.  
    Even more intriguing, people can look at the mechanisms that trigger the action; they’re visible below the money box, with hand-made wooden gears turning as they produce the action above.  
    In discussing ideas for the donation box with McDonough, PEEC mentioned these four iconic creatures of the Pajarito Plateau and hoped he’d figure out a way to use one. When he came through with all four, the staff was amazed. 

  • North Mesa Dog Park closed

    The North Mesa Dog Park will be closed for the installation of a new irrigation system and new fencing to extend the park and also to include a small dog area. The park will be closed through Friday.  
    The county expects to open the park for the weekend.  For information call the parks superintendent, Jeff Humpton, at 662-8159.

  • NM oil producers find themselves in a price war with Saudis

    Last winter, as legislators were starting to shrink the state budget to match declining oil revenues, Dr. Daniel I. Fine was trying to put his finger on what’s normal for the oil industry these days. He came up with so many variations on normal, it seems there is no normal.
    Fine, who is associate director of the New Mexico Center for Energy Policy at New Mexico Tech, predicted production in New Mexico would drop 100,000 barrels per day.
    “That’s how serious this is,” he told the House Energy, Environment and Natural Resources Committee. “OPEC is targeting high-cost producers in New Mexico, Texas and North Dakota… We are the main threat. Every barrel of oil we reduce, they will produce the equivalent.”
    I was trying to get my head around little ol’ New Mexico being a threat, as Fine continued.
    In an oversupplied world market, he said, “Saudi Arabia is in a price war with the United States. The Saudis can continue like this for two years. We’re thinking, how do we return to normal. A colleague in Bahrain said, ‘This is normal: $25 a barrel.’ Our normal is a new normal, and we conflict with what is normal.”

  • Regulatory insight from Colorado, New Mexico

    CHICAGO—Be careful who you talk to in bars. That’s one lesson from a conversation in the elegant bar at the Palmer House hotel in downtown Chicago.
    We talked to a manager from a large nationwide financial institution. This man is a market supervisor (or something like that) for New Mexico, El Paso and Oklahoma. Our discussion considered the differences between Arizona and New Mexico. It included the usual banking structure differences from 30 years ago, but also got to factors including resorts such as the Arizona Biltmore and Camelback and professional golf, which decades ago put a national focus on Arizona.
    The understanding from the conversation is that this manager and, by extension, his very, very large financial institution employer, is mystified by the New Mexico economy.
    The Chicago chat is just one happening from our recent two-week road trip through the Midwest.
    Driving northeast through Colorado on I-76, we came across the welcome center in Julesburg. The men’s restroom was closed. In its place were seven porta-potties.

  • Mang coming on strong for UNM

    Los Alamos’ Jared Mang has been coming on strong lately for the University of New Mexico baseball team.
    Against New Mexico State on May 3, Mang had his first really big game as a Lobo. Mang went 2-for-4 at the plate and drove in all three of New Mexico’s runs, helping UNM beat the Aggies, 3-2, and win the Rio Grande rivalry series, three games to one.
    Mang followed up that performance with a 3-for-5 outing with two RBI against UNLV May 6.
    He went 1-for-5 and scored a run in the second game against UNLV, but concluded the series by going 2-for-4 and knocking in another pair of runs.
    Mang is now batting .283 for UNM. He’s also scored 29 runs and drove in 25 more runs so far this season for the Lobos.
    The Lobos are currently 32-18 overall and 17-7 in the Mountain West Conference. That 17-7 conference mark has them in first place heading into this week’s series against third-place Nevada (27-20, 16-8 MW).
    The Lobos will host the Wolf Pack at 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and at 1 p.m. Sunday.
    Nevada is currently riding a nine-game winning streak.
    The Lobos will close out their regular season at Air Force the following weekend and then return home to host the Mountain West championships May 25-29.
     

  • Track teams capture district championships

    High winds affected some of the times and distances at the District 2-5A track meet Friday, but it didn’t stop Los Alamos from continuing its reign on top of the district.
    The Hilltopper boys won their 24th consecutive district title while the Hilltopper girls won their 17th straight district title at the two-day meet held at Del Norte.
    The Hilltopper boys won their title with 170 points, followed by Bernalillo (105), Del Norte (72), Capital (50) and Española Valley (50).
    The Hilltopper girls, meanwhile, scored 255 points to run away with their title. Del Norte finished second with 77 points, followed by Bernalillo (54), Española Valley (23) and Capital (23).
    “It’s a tribute to everyone on the team and everyone contributed to our 17th consecutive team title,” girls’ head coach Paul Anderson said.
    With the top-two finishers in each event at the district meet qualifying for state, the Hilltopper girls will now be represented in every event at the state meet.
    In the 800-meters race, Sydney Schake finished first in 2 minutes, 38.08 seconds to qualify while Maddy Beck also qualified with her second-place finish (2:38.80).
    Emily Mercer finished second in the 100-meter hurdles (18.02) and also scored a district title in the 300-hurdles (50.29).

  • Softball eliminated in first round of state

    A tough first inning was too much for the Los Alamos softball team to overcome against Miyamura Saturday in the first round of the Class 5A state championships.
    Miyamura, the No. 6 seed, scored eight runs in the first inning to jump out to a huge lead and then held on to beat Los Alamos, 11-0.
    The toughest part of the first inning is that Los Alamos had a chance to get out of it without giving up any runs.
    Madeline Lockhart struck out Miyamura’s leadoff hitter. The Patriots then got a bloop single. The batter after that hit a ground ball to third, but Los Alamos was unable to turn it into an out. Later in the inning, before Miyamura had scored, Lockhart got her second strike out. Instead of it ending the inning, however, the Patriots still had the bases loaded and were able to capitalize on the extra opportunity.
    “Once that happened, it was hard to recover,” Los Alamos manager Roger Anaya said.
    After that, Los Alamos limited the Patriots to one run in the third inning and two in the fourth.
    Anaya said most of Miyamura’s hits in the game were bloop singles. With the fence 300 feet deep in centerfield, he had the outfielders purposely playing deep so they could keep everything in front of them. Miyamura only hit the ball hard a couple of times, but their hits were effective.