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Today's News

  • VIDEO: Over 3 Tons of Cocaine Seized in Peru
  • VIDEO: Bound Bodies of 2 Found in Pa. River
  • Today In History, Aug. 27
  • LANL to transport C-130 today

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will receive a C-130 airplane from Kirtland Air Force Base. The fuselage of the plane will be used for emergency response training purposes.
    “This plane will boost our training capabilities for first responders,” Christian Rittner of the Laboratory’s Security and Emergency Operations Division said.
    The plane, which is surplus from Kirtland Air Force Base, has been demilitarized and will be located at the Laboratory’s emergency response training area at Technical Area 49.
    The C-130 will depart from Kirtland via flatbed truck and will arrive in Los Alamos. The expected transportation time is six hours and will be transported, under escort by N.M. State Police, via Intestate 25, north to NM 599, to US 84/285, west on NM 502 and up NM 4 to Technical Area 49.

  • Flash flood watch in effect until 6 a.m. Wednesday

    FLASH FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE TONIGHT...

    THE FLASH FLOOD WATCH CONTINUES FOR

  • Sheriff IDs victims in Main Hill crash

     

    The Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office has released the names of the people involved in Monday’s single-vehicle crash on N.M. 502.

    The man that was driving the car that plunged into Pueblo Canyon Monday is Zachary Sanchez, 30, of Los Alamos. His passenger was Espanola resident Andrea Harvier, 31.

    According to Maj. Ken Johnson, spokesperson for the Santa Fe Sheriff’s Office, Sanchez’ 2004 maroon Nissan Sentra was parked near the Anderson Overlook around Mile Post 4 at 3:14 p.m. when it suddenly accelerated for about 100 feet before plummeting 200 feet into the canyon.

     When rescue officials arrived at the base of the cliff, they found Sanchez outside the car, dazed and walking around. Harvier was found lying on the ground a short distance from the car.

    Though they know for sure that Harvier was ejected from the vehicle, they aren’t sure about Sanchez.

    Sanchez is currently in stable condition, and Harvier is still listed as critical. Sanchez was airlifted separately to CHRISTUS St. Vincent Hospital in Santa Fe and Harvier was airlifted to UNM Hospital in Albuquerque.

    Johnson said they are still trying to determine the cause of the crash. No one has been cited or charged with any crime in the incident.

  • Police beat 8/26/14

     

     Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, served a court summons, or issued a citation.

    Aug. 7

     

    9: 26 a.m. —  Rachel Parker, 23, of Los Alamos, was arrested on a municipal court warrant at 2500 Trinity Drive.

     

    11:34 a.m. — A 42-year-old Los Alamos woman reported she was the victim of larceny (less than $250) on Tewa Loop.

  • Drug suspect back in custody

     Steven Porter, a 46-year-old White Rock man who is facing 20 charges involving controlled substances — 13 felonies and seven misdemeanors — is back in jail after violating terms of his release, according to LAPD commander Jason Wardlow-Herrera Tuesday.

    Wardlow-Herrera said Porter tampered with his electronic monitoring device. Porter made his first court appearance before Magistrate Judge Pat Casados Tuesday and was given a strict set or orders for his release.

    Bond was posted last Tuesday and Porter was released last Wednesday. His next court appearance is scheduled for Sept. 2.

  • Forest health info now available

     

    The public, forest managers, and scientists now have the most comprehensive inventory of forest health trends in New Mexico’s history. Through a successful partnership between the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station and the New Mexico State Forestry Division the results of a multi-year forest study are now available.

    Given that 44 percent of New Mexico’s forests are tied to private and tribal lands, it was critical for the U.S. Forest Service and the State to work together on the inventory.

  • Antibacterial approach could resolve skin infections

     Like a protective tent over a colony of harmful bacteria, biofilms make the treatment of skin infections especially difficult. Microorganisms protected in a biofilm pose a significant health risk due to their antibiotic resistance and recalcitrance to treatment, and biofilm-protected bacteria account for some 80 percent of total bacterial infections in humans and are 50 to 1,000 times more resistant to antibiotics than simpler bacterial infections.

    “In essence, we may have stumbled onto a magic bullet,” said David Fox, a Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher on the project. “Through a robust screening strategy, our research team has identified a unique class of materials, known as ionic liquids, which both neutralize biofilm-forming pathogens and deliver drugs through the skin,” he said.