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Today's News

  • P and Z approves community garden

     

    Last week, the planning and zoning commission unanimously approved both a special use permit and a site plan for a Community Education Garden on North Mesa. 

    The Family YMCA proposed the new garden, which will be located on the south side of the horse stables, near Kwage trailhead and tennis courts. It will be just under an acre in size. 

    According to YMCA Senior Program Director Diana Martinez, the community garden is an outgrowth of the Los Alamos Youth Food Project (LAYFP), which was initiated in 2011 by a Los Alamos Middle School science teacher who wanted an outdoor classroom where her students could experience hands-on learning opportunities through garden-based curriculum. 

  • Diego Fire grows but little impact expected on LA area

     

    While it’s true that Los Alamos has frequently getting smoke from the wildfire burning near Coyote, fire officials on the scene as well as here said residents shouldn’t worry too much about it coming here.

    Be vigilant says Los Alamos Fire Department Deputy Chief Justin Grider, but don’t worry too much. 

    “There’s still a lot of unburned fuel between us and the fire,” Grider said. “It’s about 20 to 25 miles away but we do have the Las Conchas and the Thompson Ridge burn scars between us and it. So, the likelihood of it reaching us is relatively low,”

  • Be There 07-2-14

     

    Today

    Game Night: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library in the Upstairs Rotunda. 

     

    Eureka! 4 p.m. at Fuller Lodge Art Center. Artistic interpretations of discovery by a variety of local artists in a variety of media. The Portal Gallery features the work of Katherine Brittin and Charryl Berger. Daily through July 26. 

     

    The Paintings of Ryszard Wasilewski. Opening Reception from 4:30-6:30 p.m. July 11. Upstairs in the Mesa Public Library Gallery. Daily through Aug. 5.

  • PEEC program considers effects of climate change

     

    Chick Keller will delve into the important topic of climate change and what to expect in the future. Keller will give an overview of recent research on climate change and then open up a discussion about how to deal with some of the issues. 

    The program starts at 7 p.m. July 10 at PEEC and no advance registration is required.

    With the recent latest release of the science of climate change by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the Obama administration’s accompanying assessment for the United States, this is a good time to look at what is now known about how much warming and drying the world is likely to experience in the next 50 years. 

  • More scholars recall influential teachers

     

    Ten outstanding students have been awarded the Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation scholarship. Each student demonstrated a balance of academic excellence, extracurricular participation and community service throughout their high school careers. Winners chose an educator of distinction, an education professional that had a positive impact on the student’s time in the Los Alamos Public Schools. 

    Last week, the Los Alamos Monitor printed five of the 10 students honored. Here are the other five. 

    Hannah Dye chose Natasha Barkhudarova her Ballroom Dance teacher LAHS. 

  • Sustainable practices build ‘triple bottom line’ in business

     

    Renee Frank is perfectly positioned to demonstrate that sustainable practices can improve a business’s bottom line and its “upper line” — its appeal to customers who want to do business with green companies.

    Frank is a real estate agent and a certified “ecobroker” — the leader of Steinborn and Associates’ Smart Living Team and a founding member of the Las Cruces Green Chamber of Commerce.

    Her job is to help clients choose wisely where and how they’ll live in a new home. Her mission is to help other entrepreneurs realize how quickly they’ll recover the costs of incorporating energy-efficient and sustainable features and practices by generating savings and attracting customers.

    All about orientation

  • In Campaign 2014, what would Bruce do?

     

    One of the wonders of the political world was the late Gov. Bruce King. When he worked a room, no hand went unshaken and he remembered everybody’s name.

    Now that his son Gary, the Democratic candidate for governor, is the target of a fire hose of ugly ads, I can’t help but wonder what Bruce would do.

    In his autobiography, “Cowboy in the Roundhouse: A Political Life” (as told to Charles Poling), King described his campaigns and his campaign philosophy. Reading it now makes you pine for those gentler, kinder times.

  • Today in history July 2
  • Belgium tops U.S. in World Cup

     

    SALVADOR, Brazil (AP) — They captured the hearts of America — from coast to coast, big towns and small, all the way to the White House.

    Capturing the World Cup will have to wait.

    Just like four years ago, the United States is going home after the round of 16, beaten when Belgium scored twice in extra time Tuesday and then held on for a 2-1 win.

    "Thirty-one teams get their heart broken," goalkeeper Tim Howard said. "It has to end sometime. It ended a little bit early for us."

    Playing the finest game of his career, Howard stopped a dozen shots to keep the Americans even through regulation and force an additional 30 minutes. He wound up with 16 saves — the most in the World Cup since FIFA started keeping track in 2002.

    Before exiting, the U.S. showed the spunk that won America's attention. The Belgians built a two-goal lead when Kevin De Bruyne scored in the 93rd minute and Romelu Lukaku in the 105th.

    But then Julian Green, at 19 the third-youngest player in the tournament, stuck out his right foot to volley in Michael Bradley's pass over the defense in the 107th, two minutes after entering.

    "I was sure that we would make the second goal and we would go to the penalty shootout," Green said.

  • Nadal, Sharapova ousted at Wimbledon

     

    LONDON (AP) — Rafael Nadal ran out of comebacks at Wimbledon, losing to a brash, big-serving, between-the-legs-hitting 19-year-old kid who might just be a future star.

    Maria Sharapova, somehow, seemed on the verge of a turnaround despite a flurry of unforced errors, saving six match points before finally succumbing on the seventh with — what else? — a missed shot.

    And in the most striking sight of a memorable day of departures by past Wimbledon champions, Serena Williams couldn't get the ball over the net in a doubles match with her sister Venus, stopping after three games because of what was called a viral illness.

    All in all, Tuesday was chock-full of significant events, and the most noteworthy winner had to be 144th-ranked Nick Kyrgios of Australia, who used 37 aces and a have-no-fear approach to beat Nadal 7-6 (5), 5-7, 7-6 (5), 6-3 for a quarterfinal berth.

    "I was in a bit of a zone out there," said Kyrgios, the lowest-ranked player to beat the No. 1 man at any Grand Slam tournament in 22 years.

    "You've got to believe you can win the match from the very start, and I definitely thought that," the 6-foot-4 (1.93-meter) Kyrgios said. "I'm playing some unbelievable tennis on the grass."

    That's for sure.