.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Animal shelter 5-17-15

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    Annie — A 9-year-old, spayed, female who needs a peaceful indoor home. She came into the shelter several years ago as one of a kitten litter being cared for by a big gentle cat. That “mama” cat turned out to be a gentleman. Both he and Annie became part of a household. Because of medical care now needed by their owner, Annie had to come back to the shelter, now as a grown-up girl.

  • Youth Activity Center Schedule 5-17-15

    Monday: Los Alamos: Kickball, White Rock: Four Square

    Tuesday: Pool tournament

    Wednesday: Movies and muchies

    Thursday: Twister challenge  

    Friday: Kids choice

    Los Alamos: 662-9412, 475 20th St.
    White Rock: 672-1565, 139 Longview Dr.

    Open 3-6  p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday and noon-6 p.m. Wednesday, unless otherwise noted.  

    Memberships are free and open to all third through eighth graders.

  • Word on the Street 5-17-15

    Teen Pulse Student Editor Tom Hanlon asked students, “What are your plans for the summer?”

  • The Pondering Column: Is it a human’s goal in life to make the world a better place?

    Today marks the sixth edition, of “The Pondering Column.” Here I will discuss, reader questions, regarding morals, philosophy and belief.
    Today’s question, asked anonymously is, “Is it ethically incumbent on humans, at the end of their lives, to have made the world a better place or is just doing no damage good enough?”
    The question poses several very interesting quandaries. To begin, as the (hopefully) rational beings we are, we can assert almost indubitably that it is ethically wrong to do bad, damage, harm, or anything synonymous with these terms.
    However there is a rather protrusive caveat, bad things are often done with good intentions, or with a greater goal in mind.
    For example, if a soldier kills an enemy, the act of killing could still be considered wrong, but it is done for a greater good. That would make killing, specifically in this scenario an overall, good act. But which side is doing good and which bad?
    Unfortunately, this leads us to the debate over relativity and objectivity.
    For the sake of your Sunday morning, and all the trees across the world, we will forgo addressing that portion of this discussion. I digress.
    What we can conclude thus far, is that it is most certainly “ethically incumbent” on humans not to do bad.

  • ‘The Age of Adaline’ is nothing special, yet entertaining

    Directed by Lee Toland Krieger, “The Age of Adaline” is a very unique and creative film, it will keep the viewer entertained but the movie is nothing spectacular.
    “The Age of Adaline” follows a woman named Adaline Bowman (Blake Lively) who was born in 1908 and grew up to marry the man of her dreams. Sadly, he dies in an accident during the construction of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco and leaves Adaline and her young daughter, Flemming alone.
    One night on her way to pick up her daughter, Adaline is caught in an extremely rare snowfall which causes her to slide off the side of the road and into a lake.
    At that moment lightning strikes her car, which causes her to remain 29 years old forever.
    After 78 years of moving and running away from the authorities, to escape becoming a medical curiosity, and losing the ones she loves, Adaline meets Ellis Jones, (Michiel Huisman) a wealthy man who falls in love with her.
    Ellis takes Adaline to meet his parents (Harrison Ford and Kathy Baker), and his father turns out to be one of Adaline’s former lovers, leaving everyone in a very awkward situation.
    Though it may not be for everyone, because of its mellow nature, “The Age of Adaline” captures the audience’s attention and is able to keep it throughout its duration.

  • Today in history May 16
  • Hilltoppers go down swinging in semis against Goddard

    RIO RANCHO — Friday was a cold, windy and rainy day. After a two-weather delay, however, Los Alamos’ baseball team stepped on the field to take on Goddard in the Class 5A state semifinals.
    Both teams committed four errors in the contest. Goddard, however, turned Los Alamos’ errors into big innings while the Hilltoppers left the bases loaded three times and stranded five other runners on base in the game.
    Goddard eventually won the game 9-4.
    “Missed opportunities” stuck out to Los Alamos manager Mike Gill after the game. “We had plenty of them,” he said.
    Two errors, a wild pitch and a passed ball helped Goddard take a 3-0 lead in the first inning.
    After stranding a runner at third in the first and then leaving the bases loaded in the second, Los Alamos got back in the game in the third inning.
    Jarrett Genero walked and the Connor Mang singled to start the inning. A Goddard balk moved both runners into scoring and then Colin Maddox hit a bloop single down the right-field line to bring them both home.
    “As bad as it got, they never stopped fighting,” Gill said.
    Goddard responded with two runs in the bottom of the third to go up 5-2.
    Two Goddard errors on one play helped Jared Mang score and cut the lead back to two.

  • Seven Hilltoppers place on first day of state meet

    ALBUQUERQUE —After day one of the Class 5A state track meet, a handful of Los Alamos athletes had already earned all-state honors.
    Greg Ahlers had Los Alamos’ highest finish on the rain and lightning-shortened first day. Ahlers cleared 6 feet, 2 inches in the high jump to take second in the event. Ahlers came close to clearing 6-4 in all three of his attempts, but couldn’t quite get over the bar.
    Jonathan Schueler started the day with a third-place finish in the discus. His heave of 127-10 earned him a spot on the podium.
    Chelsea Challacombe also had a third-place finish. In the long jump, Challacombe leaped 18-1 1/4 to take third and score four team points.
    Two Hilltopper boys placed in the pole vault. Liam Johnson cleared 13-0 to take third and Sean Reynolds cleared 12-6 to tie for sixth.
    In the girls high jump, Fiona Rogers tied for fifth by clearing 4-8.
    Ashley Land also made it onto the podium. Land threw the discus 104-4 to take fifth in the event.
    The Hilltopper girls scored in all three of Friday’s event finals and were in third place as a team with 7.5 points. Aztec (19) was in first, Roswell (9) was second and Piedra Vista, St. Pius X and Los Lunas were all tied for fourth (7).

  • State Briefs 5-15-15

    Police: Albuquerque woman posed as firefighter, shoplifted

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Police say an Albuquerque woman who posed as a firefighter has been arrested for shoplifting.
    KRQE-TV reports that a criminal complaint says Ashley Smith was detained Wednesday after walking into an Albuquerque Home Depot and stole around $1,000 worth of electric wiring. Police say she was wearing a Santa Fe County Firefighter uniform.
    Officials say Smith is not a firefighter and has a history of theft and drug arrests.
    She is facing a shoplifting over $500 charge. It was not known if she had an attorney.

    Man will serve life in prison for shooting deaths

  • Workers seal nuke bunker at WIPP site

    CARLSBAD (AP) — Officials say workers have sealed off the first of two storage bunkers affected by a radiation leak at the federal government’s underground nuclear waste repository in southern New Mexico.
    The U.S. Department of Energy says about 85 percent of the containers packed with waste similar to the one that caused the leak have been isolated with the closure of the area known as Panel 6.
    Workers used salt mined from another area of the repository, chain link and brattice cloth to build barriers on each end of the storage bunker.
    Air monitors have been installed.
    Work to seal off a second bunker, where the radiation breach occurred, is ongoing. Officials say that should be complete in June.
    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant has been closed since the February 2014 leak.