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Today's News

  • Challenges of interpreting the Bible

    “The Bible is a tough book to read and understand. What do you think is the biggest challenge to interpreting it?” — Andrew

    A Book written over the course of some 1,400 years by dozens of authors; an ancient Book set in specific times and cultures and written in ancient languages — yes, it can be a challenge. Indeed, countless students of the Scripture have devoted much of their lives for millennia seeking to grasp fully its message.
    There are basic principles for interpretation that are accepted by most biblical scholars. These include beginning with prayer and listening for the Spirit of God (Jn. 14:26; 16:13); learning something about the passage (the author and readers, the meaning of the words to the author, the type of literature and the historical and cultural context); and, using the whole Bible when seeking to understand what it teaches.
    You and I simply cannot pick and choose selected texts. We have to explore the full range of teachings the Bible may have on a given text or topic.  
    This thought leads to what, in my opinion, is perhaps the greatest challenge for Bible readers; i.e., allowing the text to say what it says rather than demanding that it say what one wishes it to say.

  • Social promotion fails students

    Legislation that would end the failed policy of social promotion cleared the House floor Wednesday by a bipartisan vote of 38-30.
    Social promotion passes kids onto the next grade even when they cannot read.
    On the House floor, Rep. Monica Youngblood pointed out that Presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama both favor ending social promotion.
    “Improving our schools and helping struggling students learn continues to be one of our top priorities,” said Rep. Youngblood, a sponsor of the bill.
    “Today, we took a huge step in the right direction to improve our schools.”
    Among other things, the bill would help teachers identify struggling readers and provide them with the targeted instruction they need to catch up to their peers.
    The bill also emphasizes parental involvement. For example, once a struggling reader is identified, parents are given strategies to help their child improve his or her reading skills.
    Studies show that students are four times more likely to drop out if they are unable to read proficiently by the third grade. One study found that 88 percent of high school dropouts were not proficient readers in the third grade.

  • Getting bills passed takes compromise from all sides

    Stubbornness and squabbling are the biggest roadblocks to progress.
    As state legislators, we must reject Washington, D.C.’s dysfunction and gridlock if we hope to improve the condition of our state.
    The reality is Democrats and Republicans will never agree on every issue. But as elected officials, it is our job to make tough decisions and find middle ground — even if it means both parties don’t get everything they originally wanted.
    As Republicans, we know the value of compromise. After all, we served in the minority for over 60 years. The only way we were able to tackle important issues was by working with our Democratic colleagues.
    Even though we’re now in the majority, we still believe in the value of seeking common ground.
    That’s why last week we amended our right-to-work bill to include a minimum wage increase to $8 per hour.
    We believe that it’s a fair compromise to promote common-sense, job-creating legislation.
    To be clear, not everyone in my party or the business community was happy with the addition.
    Nonetheless, there are many reasons that all lawmakers, regardless of their party, should support it.

  • Sending up smoke signals to teens

    Smoke signals are usually associated with American Indians dancing around a fire sending up Morse-Code-like puffs of white dots and dashes, spelling out messages like “The war party is attacking at 2:30 from the North! Prepare the troops! And don’t forget to pick up some milk and eggs on your way home today!”
    Actually, smoke signals were more often a simple series of large puffs of smokes, sometimes a continuous stream, or multiple fires with the number of smoke columns depicting the message. And the smoke was usually black.
    Smoke signals have been used across the world since ancient times to warn of pending attacks, to communicate one’s whereabouts, or to announce to your neighbors that you put too much lighter fluid on your barbecue.
    But in the same way that sometimes a cigar is just a cigar, smoke is sometimes just smoke.
    And sadly, that’s exactly what it is at Los Alamos High School.
    New Mexico Education Admin Code 6.12.4 makes it illegal for anyone to use tobacco products on school property. So students walk to the sidewalk, a few feet off school property. 
    There, they can play American Indian message games, send up smoke columns, and enjoy their cancer sticks without breaking any school rules.

  • Today in history Feb. 20
  • This Week on PAC 8, Feb. 20-26

    THIS WEEK
    ON PAC 8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, Feb. 20, 2015
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting Replay 2-17-15
    02:00 PM MPL Authors Speak Series
    03:00 PM Gallery Discussion for Edith Warner & Tiano– Bridge Between Two Worlds
    04:00 PM Uprising
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Senior Olympics
    06:30 PM Africa: Mothers of Invention
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “Ernest Taylor Pyle”
    08:30 PM The Garage
    09:00 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:30 PM Community Central
    10:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “Now It Can Be Told”
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • Off The Hill 2-19-15

    Art exhibits
    Willy Bo Richardson: Reverberant Matter/Project I. Show runs through Feb. 27 at the Santa Fe University of Art and Design at Wade Wilson Art.

    John Chervinsky – An Experiment in Perspective. 5-7 p.m. Friday at photo-eye bookstore and project space, 376 Garcia Street Suite A. For more information, or to arrange an interview, contact Anne Kelly, 988-5152, ext. 121 or anne@photoeye.com.
    Solo exhibition by Jeri Moore. “The Language of Humanity.” Through February at the Act I Gallery.

    Weyrich Gallery features “The Landscape of Meditation” with artists Donna Loraine Contractor (local treasure), she presents her newest series, “The Sacred Geometry Tapestries”, Jerry Barnett (fused glass). Show closes Saturday. Weyrich Gallery, 2935 D. Louisiana Blvd. in Albuquerque.

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art announces “Under 35: Part III.” The exhibition will feature works by Nicola López, Nouel Riel and Jack Warren. The show runs until Saturday.

  • Community Briefs 2-19-15

    Former news anchor
    to talk in Santa Fe

  • Love in its many forms

    Just in time for Valentine’s Day, the Española MainStreet Theatre put on a series of romantic and not so romantic productions. “Love is Never Easy” is 10 separate vignettes adapted from various works centered around a love theme.
    The production spanned through a number of genres and time periods — and not all stories concluded with a happy ending.
    The first two short segments were a quick cappella of “Fly Me To The Moon,” sung by Don Hassemer, followed by the sonnet “How Do I Love Thee,” from Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and performed by Shirley “Joan” Walker. The skit was pulled off as a sweet serenade between two strangers of the older persuasion.
    The story of “Bluesman” was worthy of a mention. The story from a character named Suzanna about Herbert Jackson Walker, who left her in a favor of a music career. A blues guitar wails off stage, played by Eric Archuleta. Janet Rodriguez does a sultry, dramatic and slightly bitter monologue about the wayward lover.
    “He Said and She Said” was a painful back and forth with a manipulative gossip queen (played by Kaitlin Calkins) at the helm. Her “idle tongue” almost destroys the lives of everyone around her.

  • Mid-season concert includes solo by Los Alamos resident

    The Santa Fe Community Orchestra (SFCO) presents works by Nielsen, Sibelius, Bruch and Vivaldi at its mid-season concert. The show begins at 2:30 p.m. March 1 at the St. Francis Auditorium at the New Mexico Museum of Art in downtown Santa Fe. Admission is free, however, donations are appreciated.
    Brian Newnam is a Los Alamos resident and a well known string player in the area. He will be a soloist at the SFCO performance. He will be playing viola in the Bruch Romance for Viola.  
    This concert features Nielsen’s Symphony No.2: The Four Temperaments, plus the symphonic poem, Finlandia by Sibelius. The program also includes winners of the SFCO Concerto Competition, along with Newnam, Eve Kaye and Anne Hays Egan will perform the first movement of Vivaldi’s Concerto for Two Violins in A minor. Music director Oliver Prezant will serve as conductor. For more information, call 466-4879, or visit sfco.org.
    The award-winning Santa Fe Community Orchestra, established in 1982, is made up of volunteer musicians from Santa Fe and surrounding areas.  The SFCO presents five free concerts every season, education programs for public school students and concert audiences, and special events like “Let’s Dance!” an annual swing and ballroom dance at the Convention Center.