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Today's News

  • Community Calendar 4-2-17

    TODAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
from 10:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. at the Nature Canter. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Cost for yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.

    Feature Film: “Phantom of the Universe” from 7-7:45 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore dark matter, from the Big Bang to its anticipated discovery at the Large Hadron Collider. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
     
    Gardening for Pollinators
from 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join Master Gardener Kate Whealen and learn to select plants that support pollinators. Registration required. Cost is $10 or $8 for members.
    MONDAY
    Sleep Matters/Sleep Apnea and Treatment presentation at 2 p.m. on the third floor at Aspen Ridge Assisted Living, 1010 Sombrillo Court. Presenters are Dr. Roger Wiggins and Patricia Donahue, respiratory therapist of the SW Sleep Center. Refreshments served. No RSVP is necessary.  Los Alamos community, residents and families invited. Call Cynthia Goldblatt, community liaison at 695-8981 for information.

  • Crime Victim’s Week this week

    National Crime Victim’s Week is this week.
    Community collaboration efforts will take place for educational opportunities throughout the week and culminate in resource booths at both Smith’s locations from 1-5 p.m. Friday.
    Project partners will be on hand to answer questions and hand out free t-shirts while supplies last.
    To learn more, contact the Los Alamos Police Department Victim’s Assistant at 663-3511. No police report required.
    To learn more, visit VictimsofCrime.org.

  • Albuquerque scores the jobs for January-to-January year

    Randomly touring the state’s job numbers is worthy if only for the ritual. Trend reminders lurk—Albuquerque’s apparent economic dominance reappearing and rural problems. Another element is the Legislature’s cut-and-paste budget that kicks the can of real change so far down the road that it produces just a distant plink as it bounces.
    Over the month from December 2016 to January 2017, the state lost 19,400 jobs, 1,300 more than the 18,100 dropped from December 2015 to January 2016. For the year just past, the state’s 900-job increase represents a slight reversal from the 1,800 jobs lost between January 2015 and January 2016.
    The January 2016 to January 2017 net job performance for New Mexico’s four metro areas was 2,300 more wage jobs. Albuquerque and Las Cruces respectively added 3,800 and 800 jobs. Farmington lost 1,800 and Santa Fe, 500. The state added a net of 900 jobs, meaning that the 26 rural counties lost 1,400 jobs (2,300 minus 900 = 1,400).
    The 6.7 percent January unemployment rate that got the headlines was seasonally adjusted. The unadjusted January rate was 7 percent. The February rate increased to 6.8 percent, again seasonally adjusted.

  • Algae’s best times may lie ahead

    An algae bloom, also known as an algal bloom, is but one of the ways this old, old life form makes news. An algae bloom can look like a floating green garden, a red tide or a muddy brown oil spill.
    Algae is the collective term for a large and diverse group of aquatic plants that were early ramblers on Earth. Besides a long history, algae also have a rare ability to grow fast. An algae bloom is a rapid growth in the population of algae in a local aquatic system. Depending on the algae, blooms have special colors and can do great harm to an ecosystem. The toxic effects of some algae blooms can kill fish and mammals and threaten urban water supplies. Researchers are finding ways to combat the damage from these sudden overgrowths.
    Meanwhile, other researchers are busy finding ways to get more good from the good algae, of which there are many. The oddities of algae may help fill two of the modern world’s fast growing needs – food and fuels.
    Algae were food fit for guests in ancient China. Similar discoveries were made in Japan, Hawaii and even cropped up in Ireland.
    After World War II, a taste for seaweed, or “nori,” spread to the US with
    Japanese food. As the land gets more crowded, interest grows in the possibilities of algae for food.

  • P&Z OK’s plan to divide land at 20th and Trinity Drive

    The Los Alamos County Planning and Zoning Commission has given the go ahead to let the county divide up two tracts of county land at the intersection of 20th Street and Trinity Drive into six lots to promote development in the area.
    The two parcels are located directly across Trinity Drive from 20th Street.
    In a separate but related plan, the county is planning to extend 20th Street to the other side of Trinity Drive to provide access to the lots.
    The commission voted unanimously. After the vote, Chairman Philip Gursky congratulated the presenters of the plan, Economic Development Director Joan Ahlers and County Engineer Eric Martinez.  
    “Continue on with it, it’s something certainly consistent with the county comprehensive plan,” Gursky said.
    It’s hoped dividing the lots will lead to more business and activity in the area, which is situated between Smith’s Marketplace and the central offices of the Los Alamos Public Schools.
    Ahlers said there is already interest for three of the lots, but declined to go into specifics.
    One of the goals of the plan is to “create a vibrant pedestrian-friendly downtown that includes a central gathering place, nighttime entertainment and more retail stores and restaurants.”

  • On the Docket 4-2-17

    March 2
    Christopher Collord was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding 11-15 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant’s sentence deferred until May 2. Defendant also sentenced to defensive driving school. Defendant must pay $65 in court costs.

    Tina Martinez pleaded no contest in Los Alamos Municipal Court to failing to pay court costs and/or fines. Defendant was fined $25 and must also pay $65 in court costs.

    Amanda Franco pleaded no contest in Los Alamos Municipal Court to failing to pay and was also found guilty of speeding 11-15 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $100 and must also pay $130 in court costs.

    Juliette Martinez was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding 11-15 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant’s sentence deferred until April 30. Defendant also sentenced to defensive driving school. Defendant must pay $65 in court costs.

    Megan E. Martinez was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding six to 10 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $50 and must also pay $65 in court costs.

  • Police Beat 4-2-17

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, server a court summons, or issued a citation.

    March 3
    10 a.m. — Ryan Barnes, 39, of Los Alamos was arrested and released on a disorderly conduct charge.

    12:37 p.m. — Police reported an ID theft incident.
     
    3:37 p.m. — Police are investigating a larceny where a male individual attempted to steal meat from Smith’s. Offender left the area.

    4:40 p.m. — Police are investigating an incident where a wallet was taken from an automatic teller machine at Los Alamos National Bank.

    7:40 p.m. — Police are investigating an incident where trespass was made into an residence.

    9:30 p.m. — Police had an abandoned vehicle towed that was blocking a driveway.

    9:50 p.m. — Police arrested an individual for disorderly conduct.

    March 4
    2:44 p.m. — Police are investigating a larceny that occurred at Sirphey Restaurant.

    March 5

  • Barbecue, brew goes to the dogs

    What better way to spend a weekday evening than enjoying a beer and raising funds for a good cause? On Wednesday, Bathtub Row Brewing hosted a fundraiser barbecue for the Los Alamos Friends of the Shelter organization.
    Everyone was invited to bring food to cook over the grill and Bathtub Row provided side dishes.
    A raffle took place with prizes such as dog training classes, pet supplies and even a painting of the winner’s pet. All proceeds from the fundraiser went to Los Alamos Friends of the Shelter to help animals in need.
    Since the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter is a federal entity, Friends of the Shelter acts as an outlet to the community for information about adoptable dogs and cats.
    This non-profit organization works with the LA Shelter to promote pets looking for a forever home and help pay for medical care of homeless animals in north central New Mexico.
    Their website, lafos.org, provides a short bio for each furry friend currently at the shelter with up to date information.  
    The event was put to fruition by Leadership Los Alamos (LLA), class of 2016-2017. This non-profit was founded in 2003 with the intent of molding informed leaders from the Los Alamos community.

  • ‘Woman of Strength’ to participate in Run for Her Life

    BY SAM LEDOUX
    Special to the Monitor

  • Mrs. New Mexico a jewel in the LA community

    BY WREN PROPP
    Special to the Monitor