Today's News

  • News for Retirees Oct. 11

    Oct. 11-Oct. 17, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    BESC         Closed Columbus Day
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Fish
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    8:30 a.m.        LAVA Quilters
    8:45 a.m.         Cardio Plus Exercise
    10:15 a.m.        Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Beef Stew
    12:30 p.m.        AARP General Meeting
    1:15 p.m.        Alzheimer’s Support             Group    
    1:30 p.m.        Daytime Duplicate Bridge

  • Viewing party of ‘Manhattan’ starts Tuesday

     The Los Alamos Historical Society will continue to hold  weekly viewing parties for WGN’s Manhattan for the second season of the show. Join the group Tuesday nights at 7 p.m. at Time Out Pizzeria in Los Alamos to watch and discuss the show. The second season premiere is this Tuesday.
    Manhattan is a fictionalized drama set in Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project. WGN explains that the stories of the series are about how “scientists and their families surrender their freedoms, compromise their marriages, and even sacrifice their sanity to end one war and usher in another – the Cold War waiting just over the atomic horizon – all while embedded spies and a climate of paranoia threaten to destroy the project from within.” Every episode is a great opportunity for sparking conversations about the history of the Manhattan Project and the community.
    Join the discussion every week at Time Out Pizzeria or on the Los Alamos Historical Society’s Facebook page.

  • LAHS students thank Metzger’s

    A little bit of love goes a long way and recently Los Alamos High School students showed that love with a thank you to Metzger’s employees, from the entire student body.
    The thank you card included a small gift card for their service to the student body as a refuge for a morning bite for breakfast, lunchtime treat or, as some may hear later, a savior at the end of the day.
    A simple conversation with LAHS teacher, Lynn Ovaska and students in the International Club began with a focus on expressing concern for the Syrian refugees and what our students could do to help. 
    “The problem is so big and overwhelming that we talked about how sometimes you need to focus your energy on making a difference in your own neighborhood,” Ovaska said.
    The students did just that by collecting change from their peers in order to purchase gift cards as a thank you for their service to the community that is LAHS.
    The students operated off the saying by Mother Teresa, “Help one person at a time, and always start with the person nearest you.”

  • GOP is party desperately in search of a leader

    AP White House Correspondent

  • Tethered to technology — escaping the IT trap

    Visions and Values

  • Protecting your dog’s paws from injury

    As humans, we know the important role our hands and feet play in completing normal, daily activities. When any kind of injury affects the use of our hands and feet, we may find it very difficult to go about our regular routine. Just as humans depend on their limbs to complete daily activities, Fido’s paws are just as important to him. Running in the backyard, digging a hole for his bone and going for a walk in the park are all endeavors Fido would struggle with if he did not have healthy paws. To promote a healthy and active lifestyle, all dog owners should learn how to keep their pet’s paws free of injury.
    One of the most common ways to injure your dog’s paws is by allowing them to step on an extremely hot or cold surface. In the Texas summer heat, concrete and wood pavements can become especially hot. If your dog is exposed to a hot surface for too long, it can potentially cause sores or blisters to develop on your dog’s paw pads. In extreme winter conditions, doggie booties might be necessary to avoid chapped pads or an infection from chemical ice melters.

  • Animal shelter 10-11-15

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    Phoebe — A momma cat and her kittens will be visiting the vet over the next few days and will be available for adoption soon. Check back early next week for their status.
    Tanker — A very sweet beige-and-white tabby who was found at Los Alamos Fire House 4. Tanker is about a year old and he does well with people and cats. Tanker is still young and playful, and he enjoys being chased around the room by Sylvester. This sweet guy loves lounging on a lap, and he would make a great marathon buddy (TV marathon, that is!).

  • LA football loses district opener

    Three plays in just over two minutes completely changed the complexion of Los Alamos' football game at Capital Friday.

    The 'Toppers were in Capital's red zone and seemed poised to take the lead. A fumble, however, ended the threat and led to a Capital touchdown drive and the Jaguars took a 14-6 second-quarter lead.

    On the ensuing kickoff, Capital stripped the ball from Los Alamos' return man and ran into the end zone for another score.

    On the next kickoff, Capital once again stripped the ball and recovered it. That led to another Jaguar touchdown and a 28-6 lead.

    Capital went on to win the game, 34-22.

    Lane Saunders gave Los Alamos the first lead of the game. On Los Allamos' first possession, he scored on a 70-yard touchdown run.

    A big play by Capital tied things up near the end of the first quarter.

    After that it seemed like Los Alamos was going to go back on top, but the wheels came off and Capital took a big lead before Los Alamos was able to get rolling again.

    Two halfback touchdown passes from Saunders got the 'Toppers back in the game. After Los Alamos' last score, the team recovered an onside kick with a little over two minutes left in the game. An interception, however, ended Los Alamos' comeback bid.

  • Key to markets are keys to regulation

    Stick your nose into a crevice in the bark of a big old ponderosa pine. The smell of vanilla sweetens your senses. Some call it butterscotch, but the best noses say vanilla.
    How can a ponderosa, a species that taught respect for turpentine, surprise with the fragrance of vanilla? The story is absurd, until you put your nose in the bark.  
    We leap now to the Digital Age.  
    Information is often acclaimed as the sweet driver of market efficiency and the currency of efficient regulation. That is, information is a regulator of markets of its own accord. The more informed the trading, the wider the interests served by markets.    
    No doubt it costs time, and thus money, to hand over details on the quality of a product, or, say, factory emissions.
    Just as surely, the details allow more informed choices in the marketplace, which quicken the blessings of market efficiency. The very meaning of efficient market is one driven by widespread information.  
    The Information Age spreads data far and fast. Much the way that better data are key to market efficiency, we begin to see that better, faster data at less cost also make regulation more efficient.
    Looking further, supplying better and faster regulatory tools is itself a new market.

  • Mentally ill need more resources

    Oh, those inconvenient people – the mentally ill. They fill our jails, they scare their neighbors, they drive their families crazy and sometimes bankrupt, and once in awhile they kill somebody, or become involved in a disturbance in which the police kill them.
    The upcoming legislative session will probably revisit the painful issue of how to deal with mentally ill people who pose a real or potential threat.
    Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry recently spoke in support of a bill that almost made it though the session this year.
    As last amended during the 2015 regular session, Senate Bill 53, by Sen. Mary Kay Papen, D-Las Cruces, was intended to give the legal system a broader range of choices for dealing with mentally ill people who come to the system’s attention. Berry said it’s expected again in 2016.   
    The bill is similar to “Kendra’s Law,” first enacted in New York. That law resulted from an incident in which a schizophrenic man pushed a woman in front of an oncoming subway train.  It allows a judge to require a mentally ill person who meets certain criteria to undergo treatment, including medication, for up to a year.
    The title of the bill is “Assisted Outpatient Treatment.” What does that mean?