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Today's News

  • New Mexico Supreme Court overturns domestic violence ruling

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — In the case of a man arrested numerous times on domestic violence charges, the New Mexico Supreme Court has determined that prosecutors should have been allowed to use previous statements made by the victim despite her later decision not to testify.

    At issue was the constitutional right for a defendant to be able to confront an accuser. That right can be forfeited as a result of wrongdoing by the defendant to keep a victim or witness from testifying, but up for debate was whether that wrongdoing has to come in the form of a blatant threat.

    The court in an opinion issued Monday clarified that coercion and intimidation can have the same result as making an overt threat to ensure a victim's silence. The case was ordered back to the district court for further proceedings.

    The ruling stems from domestic violence charges that were first leveled against Joshua Maestas in 2009. At the time, prosecutors sought to keep him in custody and cited a history of domestic violence that included being arrested seven times between 2003 and 2009.

  • Congressional race in New Mexico gets Libertarian candidate

    SANTA FE (AP) — The race for the Albuquerque-based congressional district in New Mexico is likely to include a third-party candidate after business consultant Lloyd Princeton announced Monday that he will seek the seat as a Libertarian.

    U.S. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham isn't running for re-election in the 1st Congressional District as she seeks the Democratic nomination for governor against several rivals.

    Libertarian candidates are expected to have ready access to the general election ballot in New Mexico in November because of a strong local showing in 2016 by presidential candidate Gary Johnson.

    Princeton touted his professional experience at devising growth strategies for small businesses and said he wants to improve the state economy and reduce reliance on the federal government. It will be his first campaign for public office.

    "The two-party system has become about jockeying for power between the parties," said the 48-year-old entrepreneur who relocated two years ago to New Mexico from New York City. "Government at the federal level is getting exponentially bigger without simultaneously solving the problems for the people."

  • Trump appointee announces run for Congress; Salas withdraws

    Staff and Wire Reports

    ALBUQUERQUE — A former Trump administration appointee who resigned after a harsh report into a tribal loan program he oversaw announced Monday that he is running for Congress in New Mexico.

    Gavin Clarkson filed documents with the Federal Election Commission to seek the Republican nomination for the congressional seat in the southern district being vacated by Republican Rep. Steve Pearce, who is running for governor.

    Clarkson said in a campaign statement that he believes running is the "best way to help President Trump stop the swamp" and protect New Mexico.

    In November, ProPublica and The Washington Post reported that Clarkson resigned from the Bureau of Indian Affairs following an inspector general report into the loan program he directed. That report alleged the bureau's division of capital investment did not have adequate controls and managed the loan program with limited oversight.

    Clarkson, a New Mexico State University business professor and an enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, has served as the bureau's deputy assistant secretary for policy and economic development.

  • Gov. Martinez unveils tough-on-crime proposals

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez is making a final push for lawmakers to pass a series of tough-on-crime bills in her last year in office, including measures to expand the state's three-strikes law for violent felons and restore the death penalty.

    Martinez, a Republican, unveiled the legislation Monday ahead of the 30-day session that begins next week in Santa Fe.

    Her proposals include a bill to toughen penalties for people who commit crimes while on probation or parole, as well as the capital punishment and three-strikes measures — which have both been rejected in recent years by lawmakers.

    Democratic lawmakers, who now hold majorities in both the House and Senate, have in the past noted that the governor's public safety agenda is outdated, and reminiscent of a wave of 1990s anti-crime laws that some other states have reversed in recent years. She has cited a crime wave in Albuquerque, the state's largest city, and her decades as a prosecutor prior to becoming governor in arguing for harsher penalties for violent and repeat offenders.

    "Every year since taking office, I've pushed lawmakers to get tough on crime because I've seen the consequences of not being tough on crime," Martinez said.

  • US senator proposes ending protections for Mexican gray wolf

    By SUSAN MONTOYA BRYAN, Associated Press

    A wolf that once roamed parts of the American Southwest and northern Mexico would be removed from the list of federally protected species under legislation proposed by U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake.

    The Arizona Republican introduced the measure last week. He's a critic of the Mexican gray wolf recovery plan that was adopted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in November, calling it a regulatory nightmare for ranchers and rural communities.

    "I plan to continue my efforts to push for real recovery that takes into account the needs of the local stakeholders most impacted by this policy," Flake said in a statement Monday.

    The legislation calls for the director of the Fish and Wildlife Service to determine if a population of fewer than 100 wolves has been established in the species' historical range along the Arizona-New Mexico border. If so, the predator would be considered recovered and removed from the endangered list.

    Management of the wolves would be turned over to state wildlife agencies in Arizona and New Mexico once the Fish and Wildlife Service makes a determination.

    An estimated 113 wolves roam parts of Arizona and New Mexico, according to the most recent data. Members of the wolf recovery team will be conducting a new survey in the coming weeks.

  • LAPS employee helps schools

    As 2017 came to a close, Chartwell’s Food Services, the organization that feeds the staff and students for Los Alamos Public Schools, had a visit from an “elf.” This elf came to Chartwells through the help of an employee with a goal of helping to feed children.
    Director of Dining Services and Chef Mia Holsapple was asked how people could help kids in need of some assistance with lunch. To the surprise of many, there is a lot of need in our community and the donation was able to provide assistance to all of our local schools.
    The donor saw the need of many, especially single parents trying to find their way. “Her words were that she has been in the place of many people who have needed a hand up in life not a hand out,” said Holsapple. “She was blessed to be able to do this for others this time of the year.”
    The donation was used to assist a variety of students and in a variety of ways. The donor helped students by paying down balances, paying off balances and in some cases adding funds to accounts. Now more meals would be at the ready when students return to school next week.

  • C’YA 2017 nominees are in

    The 2017 nominees are in for the Community Asset Awards, which will take place January 13.
    Thirty-eight nominees that live or work in our community have been nominated for accolades from 2017. One will win the biggest honor of the night, the prestigious Spirit of the West Award, named in honor of former County Councilor Jim West.
    “We’re excited once again to acknowledge the efforts of those that make our community better in many ways every day,” said Bernadette Lauritzen, executive director of Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA). The local non-profit welcomes nominations throughout the entire year with a special focus to get submissions between Thanksgiving and the winter holidays.
    The celebration has found a home in the Betty Ehart Senior Center for several years. That night nominees and a guest are invited for a variety of desserts to herald their accomplishments. A very limited number of tickets are sold to community members that would like to attend the occasion.
    Another annual celebration is that the nominees are unaware of who nominated them for the award and why until the actual celebration is held. Nominees are never made to speak to the large crowd gathered, but are made to stand with other nominees while their accolades are shared with the crowd.

  • Pet Talk: Pet eye removal can improve their lives

    The thought of removing a pet’s eye can be scary, but in some cases, eye removal is necessary to improve the pet’s quality of life. Dr. Lucien Vallone, a clinical assistant professor in the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how eye removal can be beneficial.
    “Veterinarians and veterinary ophthalmologists perform an eye removal when an eye has become both painful and blinded by a disease that is unresponsive to medical therapy,” Vallone said. “The most common cause of this in dogs and cats is from a disease called glaucoma, which creates high pressure in the eye. Eye removal is also performed when an aggressive or malignant tumor invades the eye or nearby structures.”
    Having just one or no eyes may seem unpleasant, but most pets that have had one or both eyes removed experience a dramatic increase in their quality of life.
    “Most animals are experiencing chronic pain prior to eye removal, so most will respond postoperatively by displaying more energy and playfulness,” Vallone said. “Every animal is different, but most dogs and cats who have had one eye removed are behaviorally indistinguishable from their two-eyed peers.”

  • Snatched by hungry eagle, little dog lives to bark the tale

    Felipe Rodriguez says he thought he was hallucinating when an eagle snatched his sister’s little white dog from her yard, flapped its massive wings and disappeared over the trees.

    Did he really just see that?

    He had. Zoey the 8-pound bichon frise was gone, taken by a hungry raptor Tuesday afternoon not 50 feet from his sister’s house on the banks of the Lehigh River in Pennsylvania, Rodriguez said.

    “It seemed like something from the ‘Wizard of Oz,’” he told The Associated Press on Wednesday. “I’m a city boy. This doesn’t happen in my world.”

    Even more astonishing: Zoey would live to bark the tale.

    More on that later. But first, let it be said that eagles are quite capable of taking a small dog or a cat.

    “It has been documented before, but not that often,” said Laurie Goodrich, a biologist at nearby Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, a ridgetop preserve that annually records tens of thousands of migrating hawks, eagles and falcons.

    With food scarce and waterways freezing up, raptors are “looking a little more widely and taking advantage of whatever might be out there,” she said.

  • Pet of the Week 1-7-18

    The Los Alamos County Animal Shelter employees just want to put this up front: Rando, an eight month old Manchester Terrier that’s up for adoption, loves to chew.

    Anything, including shoes and stuffed animals. Unfortunately, it was the reason he was given up.

    But, Rando is just a puppy, and according to employees at the animal shelter, he’s a fast learner. 

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter is hoping someone can train him out of his chewing habit with the right kind of attention.

    He just needs a forever home with some adults around to mind him.

    Rando loves children and other dogs. He has also been vaccinated and microchipped.

    Rando also walks well on a leash and is housetrained. Rando is all about playing, and is good at fetching – just make sure the toy isn’t a stuffed animal.

    For more information, call the shelter at 662-8179 or email at police-psa@lacnm.us.