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Today's News

  • Storm-y Friday

    Hilltopper tracksters Skyler McCall and Michaelle Sutton were among the Los Alamos contingent at Friday’s Cleveland Storm Relays.

  • NCRTD has extra routes

    The North Central Regional Transit District will be running an extra route Friday to accommodate walkers to Santuario de Chimayó.
    NCRTD’s “Blue Buses” will have additional buses going along its regular Española-Chimayó route, district officials announced.
    This coming Friday is Good Friday, a day commemorated by Christians as the traditional day Jesus Christ was put to death, just prior to Easter Sunday. Numerous Christians in New Mexico observe the day by trekking on foot to El Santuario on Good Friday and the days leading up to it.
    NCRTD said two ADA-accessible buses will run on a continuous loop throughout the day. The buses will run from 8 a.m.-5 p.m., with the first bus leaving at 8 a.m. and the second leaving at 8:30 a.m.
    The buses will depart from the Santa Claran Hotel in Española. The route will run from N.M. 76 with designated stops to and from Chimayó.
    The route concludes at the Benny Chavez Center at the County Road 98 turnoff.
    NCRTD said delays are likely on those routes to accommodate the pilgrims walking toward Chimayó, so normal bus riders should plan accordingly.
    NCRTD provides free service in several counties and pueblos around northern New Mexico, including Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Rio Arriba and Taos.

  • HAWC observatory to study the most energetic phenomena known

    Supernovae, neutron star collisions and active galactic nuclei are among the most energetic phenomena in the known universe.
    These violent explosions produce high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays, which can easily travel large distances, making it possible to see objects and events far outside our own galaxy.
    Construction is now complete on the newest tool available to study these explosive events and learn more about the nature of high-energy radiation. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory, located 13,500 feet above sea level on the slopes of Mexico’s Volcán Sierra Negra, will soon begin collecting data at full capacity. The milestone was marked with an inaugural event at the observatory last week.
    “The HAWC observatory will detect the highest energy photons ever observed,” said Brenda Dingus, the principal investigator of the U.S. Department of Energy funding for HAWC and a research fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory. “These photons point back to astrophysical sources that accelerate particles to energies millions of times higher than man-made particle accelerators. These photons could also be produced by dark matter, which would tell us about these as yet unknown type of fundamental particles that compose most of the mass of the universe.”

  • LANL drum was root of WIPP accident

    Drum 68660, shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad from Los Alamos National Laboratory was where all the trouble started.
    The Technical Assessment Team (TAT) 277-page report was released Thursday afternoon by the Department of Energy. The TAT’s mission was to find out the root cause of the problems that led to the breach of a waste drum at WIPP, which released radioactive fumes that sickened 21 workers in February 2014.
    The TAT’s overarching conclusion was that “chemically incompatible contents of Drum 68660 from Los Alamos National Laboratory in combination with physical conditions (e.g., the configuration of the materials in the drum) supported exothermic chemical reactions leading to a thermal runaway)….”
    Thermal and pressure effects resulted in the movement of material during the release event.
    Drum 68660, as far as TAT could determine, was the sole cause of the release. According to the report, the thermal runaway was internal in that drum and not cause by outside phenomena.
    According to the report’s fact sheet, Drum 68660 breached as a result of internal chemical reactions.

  • Today in history March 31
  • Today in history March 30
  • Recurring meetings

    The Atomic City Corvette Club meets at 6 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at Time Out Pizza in White Rock. For more information, contact Chris Ortega at 672-9789.

    The Los Alamos Table Tennis Club meets from 7:30-10 p.m. Tuesdays; and from 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays, at the Betty Ehart Senior Center, lower level. On Tuesday, there is a fee of $2 per player. There is no charge on Saturday. For more information, contact Avadh Saxena at AVADH—S@hotmail.com or Ed Stein at 662-7472.

    The Lions Club meets at 84 Barcelona in White Rock on the first and third Thursday. For more information, call 672-3300 or 672-9563.

    The Rotary Club of Los Alamos meets at 11:45 a.m. every Tuesday at the Manhattan Project Restaurant, formerly known as the Dixie Girl.

    Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos meets Tuesdays from Noon-1 p.m. at Trinity on the Hill Church in Kelly Hall.

    The Military Order of World Wars hosts a monthly dinner meeting on the third Tuesday of each month. For more information, call 662-9544.

    Los Alamos MS Self-Help Group meets at 6:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Mesa Public Library, Upper Level Meeting Room 1.

  • Be There calendar 3-31-15

    Today
    The Los Alamos Photographer’s Show. Through May 2 in the upstairs gallery of the Mesa Public Library.

    Canyons, Mesas, Mountains, Skies: Heather Ward. Through May 16 at the Portal Gallery.
    Wednesday
    Jemez House Thrift Store Bag Days. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. 13 Sherwood Blvd. in White Rock. 672-1620.

    The Los Alamos Arts Council’s Free Brown Bag performance presents pianist Peter Pesic. Noon at the Fuller Lodge in the Pajarito Room.

    Game Night: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the Mesa Public Library in the Upstairs Rotunda.
    Thursday
    The Los Alamos County and Los Alamos Public Schools will have a community meeting on resiliency. The event will be 6-7:30 p.m. at Aspen Elementary. An open house format style will allow a come and go presence to allow attendees to listen to presentations, as well as visit resource booths. For more information, call 663-3252.

    Free Film Series. “Laura.” 6:30 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library.  
    Friday
    Jemez House Thrift Store Bag Days. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 13 Sherwood Blvd. in White Rock. 672-1620.
    Saturday
    Jemez House Thrift Store Bag Days. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 13 Sherwood Blvd. in White Rock. 672-1620.
    Sunday

  • Assets in Action: Read a book that shows life isn’t awful

    As reading is an Asset and very soon we will be in the midst of some time when reading might be possible, I solicit your feedback on some titles.
    I am interested in the books youth or adults should read to see light at the end of the tunnel. Oh, I don’t mean that light, I mean the one like a ray of sun that parts through the storm clouds.
    I’ve heard the term resiliency reading and I wonder what titles one should read to realize that things often do get better. Life isn’t so bad after all, or anyone can overcome any odds, if they are willing to trudge through the battle.
    At the recommendation of Los Alamos Middle School Librarian Lisa Whitacre, I read a book that would be appropriate for fifth or sixth graders called, “Wonder.” It is also available with the Los Alamos County Library System.
    It is a great resource to teach young students what it is like not only to be new to a school but also to be very, very different. It may also give parents a glimpse into parenting styles, too.
    The next book is called, “Laughing at my Nightmare,” by Shane Burcaw, who has spinal muscular atrophy that has control over most of his life, but not his brain and not his mouth.

  • Pianist to perform at next Brown Bag

    The public is invited to an intimate brown bag performance featuring pianist Peter Pesic. Sponsored by the Los Alamos Arts Council, the show starts at noon April 1 at Fuller Lodge in the Pajarito Room.
    J.S. Bach’s “Goldberg Variations” are among his greatest and most familiar works, but in the 1970s, a previously unknown set of 14 canons on the Goldberg theme were discovered. The concert presents those canons to show how Bach developed the variations that follow.
    Pesic has been a tutor at St. John’s College in Santa Fe since 1980, where he has been musician-in-residence since 1984. Pesic himself has given 200 concerts, including first performances of works by Nicolas Roussakis, David Lang and Lawrence Cave.
    He has performed the complete cycle of piano sonatas of Schubert four times (once at Harvard University in 1987), the complete Beethoven sonatas also four times, as well as a Mozart cycle, the complete solo keyboard music of J.S. Bach, Joseph Haydn, and Johannes Brahms, and the complete piano music of Schoenberg, Berg and Webern.
    Pesic has played Bach’s “Goldberg Variations” in Los Angeles and at Dartmouth College; he was the piano soloist with the Santa Fe Symphony in Beethoven’s “Choral Fantasy.”