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Today's News

  • LAPS board picks recruiter

    It’s “all systems go” for the Los Alamos School Board, as it has found the engine behind its search for a new superintendent. The board recently met to discuss its top five picks for the group, which will help recruit the new superintendent.
    By the time the meeting was over, the board picked Ray and Associates, an executive recruiting firm based in Cedar Rapids Iowa.
    “With Ray, they look like they are going to leave it to what we want, and they will work with us,” said Judy Bjarke-McKenzie, the school board’s president to her fellow board members. “They don’t have a cookie cutter approach, they look like they’re pretty flexible.”
    Board secretary Matt Williams agreed with Bjarke-McKenzie’s choice, and like her, also picked HYA as a second.
    The board seemed to be looking for firms that were willing to go that extra mile, dig deep, and really listen to what the board and the community wanted in a candidate, as it outlined in the search plan. Firms that sent them standard paperwork and forms to fill out quickly fell by the wayside.

  • Today In History, Oct. 22
  • VIDEO: Wyoming Recognizes Same-Sex Marriage
  • VIDEO: Lightning Strikes Over NYC Skyline
  • Be There 10-22-14

    Today
    Brown Bag Lecture: Environmental Stewardship. Noon -1 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum. Sam Loftin and Lorrie Bonds Lopez will provide the results of site-wide surveillance and progress toward far reaching environmental challenges to which the laboratory is committed. Free and open to the public.

    Game Night: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the Mesa Public Library in the Upstairs Rotunda.

    The League of Women Voters’ will be having a meeting to discuss the Education Study Committee’s research and how it is progressing. The public is welcome, 7 p.m. at UNM-LA, building 2, room 230.

    Play reading for “Mr. Roberts.” 7-9 p.m. at the Los Alamos Little Theater. Auditions set for Nov. 2-4 with performances scheduled for March 2015.
    Thursday
    Los Alamos Farmers Market. 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library parking lot.

    Race for the Cure Makeover Marathon at The Beauty Villa, 146 Central Park Square. Join local Mary Kay independent beauty consultants to raise money funds for breast cancer research and get a free no obligation facial. Call to reserve a date and time, 660-7258.

  • Community Charity Pumpkin Patch

    The 4th Annual Community Charity Pumpkin Patch will be 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday at the Calvary Chapel on North Mesa next to the Posse Shack. Bring the kids to the event is free where everybody gets a pumpkin, as well as Frito pies, donuts, cookies, hot chocolate, hot cider and other treats. There will also be face painting, games, a hayride and a petting zoo.

  • Beer co-op looking 300 new members to open first cooperative craft brewery

    Los Alamos will soon be among only a handful of cities in the country to open the first cooperative craft brewery, and is brewing up several rich and tasty incentives to attract 300 new member/owners and investors to make that happen. Without more capital, the brewery will have to delay opening.
    The Los Alamos Beer Co-op (LABC) estimates that the future brewery will open its new location early in 2015. With 300 more memberships in the next few months, the Co-op hopes to hire a professional brewer and eventually produce four varieties of beer, along with root beer and cider.
    A co-op brewery is different from traditional breweries in that members own part of the business. Therefore, each member has the power to vote on how the business should be run, what types of beers should be offered, and other decisions which independently-owned craft breweries don’t allow anyone other than the owners to make. Unlike traditional breweries, any revenue has to be reinvested or returned to the members/owners.
    There are currently only three co-op breweries in the country and the idea is fast becoming the preferred business model for startup breweries who are tapping their communities for the funds and sweat equity it takes to get the brewery off the ground.

  • Nature on Tap tackles prescribed burning and wildfire training

    No one wants to see another mega fire like Las Conchas tear through New Mexico, and prescribed burning, when done safely and properly, can go a long way toward preventing such fires.
    But in order to be safer in fighting wildfires, firefighters need to receive certain qualifications, and there is a growing concern that there will not be enough qualified firefighters within 10 years.
    In response, organizations around the country are conducting Prescribed Fire Training Exchanges (TREX). Ecologist and PEEC board member Karla Sartor is fresh off the lines of a two-week, bilingual TREX in the Santa Fe National Forest and Valles Caldera National Monument. Sartor will introduce this topic at the next Nature on Tap, which will be 5:30 p.m. Thursday at the Manhattan Project Restaurant.
    Nature on Tap, hosted by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center, is part of an informal discussion series started by the Los Alamos Creative District.
    Each month a different topic about nature is introduced by a facilitator, and then the topic is opened up to the group for informal discussion.
    The fourth Spanish-language international prescribed training exchange wrapped up its work burning and learning on and around the Santa Fe National Forest and Valles Caldera National Monument last month.

  • Monsters are still in the closet for patients

    CHILE PAC’s half-hour infomercial titled “Breakdown” is an interesting entry into campaign debate.
    Its subject is the human impact of the state Human Services Department’s shutdown of 13 behavioral health providers and their replacement with five Arizona firms.
    Concerned Hispanics Involved in Legislative Empowerment used documentary techniques to take the audience inside the homes of people struggling to care for a mentally ill relative. It also gives a voice to providers who were disgraced and thrown out with no chance to defend themselves.
    Aired recently, “Breakdown” is obviously aimed at Gov. Susana Martinez. Her campaign filed an ethics complaint with the Secretary of State’s Office that CHILE PAC hadn’t registered with the state or filed finance reports. (Imagine an outfit sitting on millions in dark money complaining about a trifling $4,500 spent on the spot.) Still, I credit the organizers for reminding us that this is about sick, troubled people.
    We meet Gib Lovell, whose son Caleb is schizophrenic. After the state’s closure of Caleb’s accustomed provider, the new provider cut back on treatment and services. Lovell built a six-foot wall around his property. “If Caleb has a bad day,” he said, “I can keep my son out of harm’s way.”

  • Sports Briefs 10-22-14

    Yum Run returns for its 10th year

    The Yum Run will return this year Nov. 1.
    The Yum Run includes 10K, 5K and 1K races and proceeds from the event go to benefit LA Cares. It will start downtown near Ruby K’s Bagels. Runs begin at 9 a.m.
    Registration forms are available at Ruby K’s store or at the business’ website, rubykbagel.com. For further information, call 672-1639.

    Motorists warned about meet parking Friday

    Parking will be tight around Los Alamos Golf Course for Friday’s home cross country meet, Los Alamos High School’s athletic office warns.
    Parking won’t be allowed on Diamond Drive for Friday’s event, which will start at 3 p.m.
    LAHS’ athletic office said signs will be posted around LAGC for motorists looking for a place to park.